“Unani System, one of the effective medications for Boosting overall Immunity during COVID-19” said by Prof. Dr. Asim Ali Khan, Director General – CCRUM, Ministry of AYUSH, Govt. of India | Odisha Breaking News | Odisha News | Latest Odisha News

“Unani System, one of the effective medications for Boosting overall Immunity during COVID-19” said by Prof. Dr. Asim Ali Khan, Director General – CCRUM, Ministry of AYUSH, Govt. of India | Odisha Breaking News | Odisha News | Latest Odisha News

  • January 22, 2021

New Delhi: AYUSH Committee, PHDCCI organized a Webinar on “Proven & Effective Unani System as Immunity Booster during COVID-19”. The webinar was graced with the presence of Padma Bhushan Vd. Devendera Triguna, President of AMAM, All India Ayurvedic Congress and Ayurveda Mahasammelan, Prof. Dr. Asim Ali Khan, Director General – CCRUM, Ministry of AYUSH, Govt. of India, Dr. M.A. Qasmi, Joint Advisor (Unani), Ministry of AYUSH, Govt. of India, Mr. Pradeep Multani, Sr. Vice President, PHDCCI, Mr. Arvind Varchaswi, Chair, AYUSH Committee, PHDCCI & Managing Director, Sri Sri Tattva, Mr. Jitender Sodhi, Co- Chair, AYUSH Committee, PHDCCI & Managing Director, AYUSH Herbs Pvt Ltd and today’s session moderator Mr. Vivek Seigell, Assistant Secretary General, PHDCCI.

The other eminent panellist present were Dr. Mohammad Akram, Associate Professor & Head, Deptt. Of Tahaffuziwa Samaji Tibb, Jamia Hamdard, Prof. Ashhar Qadeer, Dept. Of Kulliyat, Ajmal Khan Tibbia College, AMU Aligarh (U.P), Dr. Khursheed A. Ansari, Associate Professor, Dept. of Anatomy, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, Dr. Aleemuddin Qaumri, Reader & Head of Dept. of Moalijat, National Institute of Unani Medicine, Bangalore, Dr. Santosh Joshi, Sr. General Manager, R&D, Hamdard Laboratories India, Mr. Sameer Kant Ahuja, Chief Manager (Regulatory) Multani Pharmaceuticals Ltd.

While welcoming the Government dignitaries Mr. Pradeep Multani, Sr. Vice President, PHDCCI in his welcome remarks deliberated about Unani medicine and its increase in usage in India and abroad. The Unani System of Medicine offers treatment of diseases related to all the systems and organs of the human body. The Unani treatments for chronic ailments are highly effective and acceptable.

Mr. Multani emphasized that Immunity is a defense system within the body to protect the host from invading pathogens. The body can neutralize & eliminate the pathogenic micro-organism & their toxic products, thus protecting the individual. The most common problem of all sort of infections is tackled very successfully by the Unani system of medicine approach in strengthening the immune system which in turn eliminates infectious agents and exert least side effect.

Padma Bhushan Vd. Devendera Triguna, President of AMAM, All India Ayurvedic Congress and Ayurveda Mahasammelan thanked Ministry of AYUSH for their efforts for promoting all AYUSH system and said that Unani medicine has played a critical role in developing overall immunity and fighting against the pandemic.

Mr. Arvind Varchaswi, Chair, AYUSH Committee, PHDCCI & Managing Director, Sri Sri Tattva in his remarks gave an industry perspective and the importance of Unani System as Immunity Booster during COVID-19. He also highlighted that Unani System of Medicine offers treatment of diseases related to all the systems and organs of the human body. The treatments for chronic ailments and diseases of skin, liver, musculo-skeletal and reproductive systems, immunological and lifestyle disorders have been found to be highly effective and acceptable.

Prof. Dr. Asim Ali Khan, Director General – CCRUM, Ministry of AYUSH, Govt. of India talked about Unani system has a global presence in India and various other countries. He said that Unani immunomodulators has played a significant role in building overall immunity of an individual.

Prof. Dr. Khan thanked Ministry of AYUSH, Govt. of India for their continuous support in promoting Unani system of medicine. He said, Central Council for Research in Unani Medicine (CCRUM) has done several clinical trials & research studies during COVID-19. The system has established Unani centers with a specialist for treating patients.He has also mentioned about National Institute of Unani Medicine (NIUM) which has been developed as a model for post graduate, teaching, and research in Unani System of Medicine. He further mentioned that all system of AYUSH is working together for promoting AYUSH system in India.

Dr. M.A. Qasmi, Joint Advisor (Unani), Ministry of AYUSH, Govt. of India while lauding the constant efforts of PHD Chamber of Commerce and Industry and assured that we will be working together with the Industry to boost the Unani system.

Dr. Mohammad Akram, Associate Professor & Head, Deptt. Of Tahaffuziwa Samaji Tibb, Jamia Hamdard mentioned that prevention is the only cure in these current times. He further mentioned that COVID-19 will live longer than our expectations and there is no effective treatment in any system of medicines. He also mentioned that people need to focus on immunity-boosting and physical health well-being. Proper ventilation, healthy diet, constant exercise, proper sleep, retention, and elimination of body and less mental illness need to be focus areas for achieving good immunity.

Prof. Ashhar Qadeer, Dept. Of Kulliyat, Ajmal Khan Tibbia College, AMU Aligarh (U.P) talked about the concept of Tabiyat that systematically regulates the body. He mentioned that Covid-19 has its immunity and its power will change according to the immunity of the body. He emphasized that immunity-boosting is the only prevention of COVID-19.

Dr. Khursheed A. Ansari, Associate Professor, Deptt. of Anatomy, JamiaHamdard, New Delhi in his presentation on proven and effective Unani system as immunity booster during covid-19, highlighted that prevention is better than cure. He discussed the self-protection and prevention needed for the spread of the disease like wearing the mask, social distancing, sanitization, and many more. He talked about the general Unani Prophylaxis which included restriction of diet; have nonveg diet; eating citrus foods; have warm sips of water; have afternoon nap; don’t do heavy exercises; no alcohol consumption; steam inhalation; fumigation with sandal, camphor, and pomegranate rind and many more.

Dr. Aleemuddin Qaumri, Reader & Head of Deptt. of Moalijat, National Institute of Unani Medicine, Bangalore in his presentation deliberated about the immune system, types, and process. He further deliberated about the COVID-19 pandemic, its pathogenesis, and factor. He mentioned that immune response determines the host severity of symptoms like severe/moderate/mild. Talking about Unani medicines and immunity he discussed its principles and practices. He mentioned that the regimen has to be taking micro and macronutrients like vitamin C, D and minerals like Cu, Se, Zn, Fe, etc. he also mentioned that vitamin D3 is essential for boosting the immune system.

Dr. Aleemuddin Qaumri emphasized that a novel pandemic condition has no certain treatment. Vaccinations under trial phase and prevention are needed to be prioritized. The role of alternate systems of medicine emerged as an ‘immune booster’ rather than immunomodulators.

Dr. Santosh Joshi, Sr. General Manager, R&D, Hamdard Laboratories India mentioned that people have faith in Unani and, it has grown in a multi-fold manner. He discussed the concept and types of immunity. He also mentioned the programs and products of Hamdard which has helped in boosting immunity in the COVID-19 times.

Mr. Sameer Kant Ahuja, Chief Manager (Regulatory), Multani Pharmaceuticals Ltd while giving a background about Unani medicines, their importance, history, and government regulations towards it discussed the common compound Unani formulations and common immunostimulant single drugs of Unani medicines for boosting immunity. He highlighted that the Unani system is one of the oldest forms of medication. He also urged the Industry to come forward and work together on R&D, so that it reaches more heights of success and meets the global demand.

Mr. Jitender Sodhi, Co-Chair, AYUSH Committee, PHDCCI gave a formal vote of thanked all the eminent dignitaries for joining today’s webinar. Mr. Sodhi also talked about the significance of Unani medicine in boosting overall immunity and use of herbal remedies, dietary practices, and alternative therapies which could help in combating the ongoing pandemic.

The webinar was sponsored by AYUSH Herbs Private Limited and Association of Manufacturers of Ayurvedic Medicine (AMAM) and attended by over 150 participants.

 

W420 Radio

W420 Announces Special Report Episode: Saving Lives by Boosting Immunity

  • January 15, 2021

W420 Radio

W420 Radio Network, the first virtual radio station dedicated to America’s cannabis industry conversation, is announcing a special report on “America’s Cannabis Conversation.” This important episode will be airing this Saturday January 16th @ 4:20pm in your time zone. It will be available on W420radionetwork.com immediately following the show.

There is no debate that boosting immunity is one of the best ways to promote good health. W420 Radio Network will be offering a special report highlighting: The role of supplements – as a key tool to empower you – to build the strongest immune system to fight illness and how important this relationship is.

Joseph Dowling, CEO of CV Sciences, explains: “We decided to give our employees immunity-boosting supplements for free. It is so important to take care of employees, firstly, for their health and indirectly to help companies survive. We hope all companies will take care of their employees every way possible.” CV Sciences has initiated research, published studies, and is the first company to achieve GRAS safety status for hemp derived CBD. Their mission – improving the quality of life through nature and science.

The world has witnessed how the vaccine rollout is going, haphazard at best, it is imperative right now for everyone to take health matters into one’s own hands, as there is no guarantee when you will receive it, and time is of the essence. Proactively boosting immunity to stay healthy – just makes sense.

“This episode is so important as the insights discussed can save lives. I am so glad we can offer this to our listeners,” expresses Dan Perkins, co-founder of W420 Radio Network and host of “America’s Cannabis Conversation.” To learn more about these supplements and how you can empower yourself go to http://empoweryourself.info./

This week’s guest lineup also includes the following esteemed doctors to offer their expertise:

– Dr. Joe Maroon, Neurosurgeon, https://www.josephmaroon.com/

– Dr. Michael Lewis, Physician, http://drmichaellewismd.com/

– Dr. Steven Schmitz, Physician and Board of Directors CV Sciences https://www.cvsciences.com/

– Joseph Dowling, CEO of CV Sciences, https://www.cvsciences.com/

– Stuart Tomc, VP of Human Nutrition CV Sciences, https://www.cvsciences.com/

W420 Radio Network is the brainchild of powerhouse entrepreneurs – Marc Corsi and Dan Perkins. W420 recognizes and brings to air: interesting, timely and important content with the benefit of high-profile experts to address every facet of the cannabis industry. Informing businesses and consumers alike with the most up-to-date cannabis news. We are here to educate, bring awareness on issues and create community.

To listen an episode go here CRN: https://crntalk.com/

For more about W420 Radio Network go here: https://w420radionetwork.com/

Immunity boosting foods to consume during winter explains nutrition expert Rohit Shelatkar

Immunity boosting foods to consume during winter explains nutrition expert Rohit Shelatkar

  • January 14, 2021

Rohit Shelatkar, VP at Vitabiotics, Fitness & Nutrition Expert is here to tell you all about immunity-boosting foods. Check it out

People are always more likely to get sick during the winter months, whether it is the threat of the common cold or the flu season, and now the novel coronavirus, sickness looms during the colder months. This is why it is extremely important for people to strengthen their immune defences during the winter. Thankfully, there is an array of winter foods that can help our bodies fight off infections and illness.

Sweet Potatoes:

Sweet potatoes are rich in beta-carotene and Vitamin A. They can keep the body stay warm while the high concentration of antioxidants, vitamin A and C, and minerals like iron and potassium can help fight off chronic diseases, reverse signs of ageing and even detoxify the body. One should consume sweet potatoes in salads, soups and cooked or stir-fried vegetables as part of a regular winter diet.

Jaggery:

Jaggery is a super food that stimulates digestive enzymes and improves digestion because it helps to reduce acidity, bloating and gas. Jaggery also has a mild laxative effect which helps tackle constipation. Eating jaggery also helps to fight cough, cold, flu and other ailments that commonly occur in winter.

Berries:

Berries are a great source of Vitamin C, an essential vitamin to support a healthy immune system. They contain antioxidants that can help to keep the immune system strong and can help to fight off respiratory infections that are common during the winter cold. Research has found that berries have antibacterial properties as well as anti-inflammatory and antiviral effects, which is why they should be a staple part of one’s diet during the winter months.

Green Vegetables:

Dark greens like spinach, kale, and broccoli are wonderful additions to a diet. Leafy greens are high in Vitamins A, C and several antioxidants and this helps to naturally reduce inflammation that stems from running and heavy workouts.

Amla/Indian Gooseberry:

Amla or Indian Gooseberry is another seasonal yet super nutritious food available during the winters. Amla contains about five times the vitamin C present in oranges. Hence, it is a great immunity booster and detoxing food.

Fish:

Fish like salmon, tuna, mackerel and herring are excellent sources of the omega-3 fatty acids, DHA and EPA, which can help to reduce inflammation and activate certain immune cells. Fatty fish are also natural sources of zinc, selenium, and one of the few natural food sources of Vitamin D.

Eating a well-balanced diet is not the cure to ailments and disease, but it certainly helps to support the body’s immune system and boost overall energy levels. Nutrients such as Vitamins A, C, D and E, zinc and omega 3 fatty acids are known for their powerful impact on the immune system.

Also Read: Winter Special Gajar ka Halwa: Quick and Fuss free recipe

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The Truth About Boosting Your Immune System: what we learned

  • January 13, 2021

Apparently so! A&E doctor Ronx Ikharia leads 6 volunteers on an immune-supporting journey to improve their immune system in 6 short weeks. Here are our 14 takeaways from the documentary The Truth About Boosting Your Immune System

The job of our immune system is to stop viruses and bacteria from infiltrating our bodies and making us ill and Covid-19 has pushed our immune system to the forefront of our minds because it’s vital in helping us fight diseases. In the hour-long BBC show, The Truth About Boosting Your Immune System, A&E doctor Ronx Ikharia dives into the latest science to find out what we can do to make our immune system as healthy as possible.

Dr Ronx teams up with Professor Sheena Cruickshank, immunologist at the University of Manchester, to run a unique experiment. They recruited a group of six volunteers and gave them an ‘immune makeover’, changing their diet to fibre and veg packed meals, encouraging moderate exercise and suggesting eight hours of sleep a night for six weeks to test the impact on their immune health. And the results give us much hope!

Here are our 14 key takeaways from the show.

1. We have two main types of immune cells with different jobs

There are front-line defenders called neutrophils. They don’t care what the invader is, they just quickly and aggressively attack. When an infection enters via our airways, digestive tract or cuts to our skin, these front line defenders go into battle within minutes. Some swallow the invader whole, others release chemicals to kill them and some throw out nets to ensnare and eliminate the infection. But frontline defenders can’t always stop the spread of the infection. Then our specialist immune cells come in.

Specialist immune cells (lymphocytes) aren’t as fast but can be more effective, identifying the specific infection and releasing a custom made attack to kill the invader. These are what help us build long-term immunity because they remember invaders they’ve met before and fight them off a second time.

2. An overactive immune system is a bad thing

Having too many neutrophils (the fast-acting attacking cells) can suggest our immune system is too active and aggressive. They can start to damage not just infections but healthy cells, resulting in us feeling fatigued, making us more vulnerable to infection and six times more likely to have severe Covid illness.

A healthy immune system needs a good balance of neutrophils and lymphocytes, with no more than three neutrophils to every one lymphocyte. The imbalance, normally a result of modern lifestyle factors such as poor diet and lack of sleep, can be readjusted.

3. Alcohol seriously depletes our immune systems – and fast!

In the programme, Dr Ronx takes one for the team and gets drunk (all in the name of science) on half a bottle of Prosecco.Dr Ronx has blood samples are taken beforehand and again the morning after to measure how many of each type of immune cells are present. The results show that drinking substantially decreased Dr Ronx’s immune cells that fight and identify the infections; in just 12 hours some of their immune cells had dropped by up to half. So we’re more susceptible to catching an infection a night after drinking.

MORE GLOSS: How to stop alcohol wrecking your skin

4. Common herbal remedies aren’t always reliable

Many supplements claim to have immune-supporting powers and in the UK alone it’s estimated we spend more than £1billion per year on vitamins and supplements. At UCL’s School of Pharmacy, Dr Ronx looks at three popular herbal immune supplements – echinacea, garlic and elderberry. They dismissed the garlic and elderberry supplements right away as there was no concrete evidence these helped the immune system.

Only echinacea was reliable for immune-strengthening, with ‘reasonable’ evidence to support its effectiveness in treating symptoms of cold and flu, shortening the length of sickness by up to a day and a half. However, choose your echinacea carefully. Dr Ronx tests how much echinacea is actually in the products (they don’t say which brands they tested). Some had almost none of the herb in them. They advise looking for the THR mark (Traditional Herbal Registration) for a reliable product that will make a difference.

One supplement Dr Ronx does recommend for everyone in vitamin D, as studies show vitamin D makes our immune system better at killing viruses. White people need ten minutes of sun per day for their vitamin D dose, while a black person may need 30 to 40 minutes for their daily exposure, depending on their level of melanin.

MORE GLOSS: The best immunity supporting supplements to buy now

5. Red pepper is better for immunity that oranges

Vitamin C is well-known to help immune cells function, but don’t reach for the orange juice. Red peppers are almost twice as rich in vitamin C. Half a sweet pepper a day gives us what we need.

MORE GLOSS: The best vitamin C serums for your skin

6. Fibre gives our immune system a killer instinct

Not only does fibre promote gut bacteria growth (which is essential for maintaining our immune system) but it also provides ammunition to our immune cells, allowing them to fight off infection. The chemical produced when we eat fibre helps the immune cells which engulf infection. Adding more fibre to our diets helps to decrease bacteria survival rate, thus making us less susceptible to infection.

7. Stress can actually improve your immune system

But only short-term stress, that is. This type benefits the immune system as Dr Ronx discovers when they come face to face with their greatest fear, spiders. After the encounter, their neutrophil cells have increased by 20 per cent in 20 minutes. The fight-or-flight response increases immune strength, so if you are exposed to a bug that might infect the body the immune system is primed to tackle it. The immune system is then better of identifying threats and fighting them off. Long term stress however actively depletes the immune response by causing inflammation.

8. Regular cold showers can reduce your chance of illness

The shock from a cold shower elicits the same immune response as the fight or flight response. A study required one group of people to have a 20-second cold shower each day while another group was spared this trauma. The cold shower group reported 30 per cent less sickness than the other group.

MORE GLOSS: The health benefits of cold water shock

9. Exercise supports our immune system – but it has to be the right intensity.

As we work out, our immune cells do too. As our blood flow increases immune cells move more rapidly into our veins, helping them to do their jobs, looking out for germs and killing them. Exercise can increase lymphocytes up to six-fold, helping to balance our immune system and make it more effective at fighting infection.

It has to be moderate exercise, however, enough to that set your heart rate going and for you to work up a sweat. It’s not necessarily the more exercise the better…

10. Intense exercise can make you more susceptible to coughs and cold

Extreme exercise can make you up to six times more likely to suffer from upper respiratory illnesses such as coughs and colds. Aim for exercise where you can still talk, but not sing.

11. Massage can help with immunity

Possible the best news in the show; nerves in the skin are connected to where the immunity cells are stored and by stimulating these through massage, more are produced, boosting the immunity. Dr Ronx tried a massage (again, in the name of science!) and saw a 20 per cent increase in the immune-boosting cells post-massage.

12. Sleep helps our immune system

People who get less than seven hours of sleep are three times more likely to develop a cold than those who get more than eight hours. It’s thought that during sleep our immune cells are better at latching onto infection, making them quicker to fight infections.

MORE GLOSS: 15 ways to get a better night’s sleep

13. You can get a better immune system in six weeks

At the end of the trial, when their levels of neutrophils and lymphocytes were measured again four out of the six participants reported more balanced levels and thus a more stable immune system which resulted in them being better equipped to deal with infection. One participant fell ill with Covid so couldn’t complete the experiment, but one caught a cold during the makeover and said he recovered much quicker than usual.

“This goes to show that with modest lifestyle changes we can better protect ourselves, bringing our immune systems back into balance,” says Dr Ronx. “If we eat a diet full of fibre, supplemented with vitamin D, follow a moderate exercise regime, and regularly get a good nights sleep we can keep our immune cells fighting fit. The immune system is incredibly complex and we still have a lot to learn. We can’t make ourselves invincible but when we do get ill, having a healthy immune system makes us more able to fight it off.”

The Truth About Boosting Your Immune System is on BBC iPlayer

MORE GLOSS: How to eat for immunity in a pandemic

Children's immune response more effective against COVID-19 -- ScienceDaily

Boosting a natural cellular process could reduce damage, study suggests — ScienceDaily

  • January 12, 2021

An unfortunate truth about the use of mechanical ventilation to save the lives of patients in respiratory distress is that the pressure used to inflate the lungs is likely to cause further lung damage.

In a new study, scientists identified a molecule that is produced by immune cells during mechanical ventilation to try to decrease inflammation, but isn’t able to completely prevent ventilator-induced injury to the lungs.

The team is working on exploiting that natural process in pursuit of a therapy that could lower the chances for lung damage in patients on ventilators. Delivering high levels of the helpful molecule with a nanoparticle was effective at fending off ventilator-related lung damage in mice on mechanical ventilation.

“Our data suggest that the lungs know they’re not supposed to be overinflated in this way, and the immune system does its best to try to fix it, but unfortunately it’s not enough,” said Dr. Joshua A. Englert, assistant professor of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and co-lead author of the study. “How can we exploit this response and take what nature has done and augment that? That led to the therapeutic aims in this study.”

The work builds upon findings from the lab of co-lead author Samir Ghadiali, professor and chair of biomedical engineering at Ohio State, who for years has studied how the physical force generated during mechanical ventilation activates inflammatory signaling and causes lung injury.

Efforts in other labs to engineer ventilation systems that could reduce harm to the lungs haven’t panned out, Ghadiali said.

“We haven’t found ways to ventilate patients in a clinical setting that completely eliminates the injurious mechanical forces,” he said. “The alternative is to use a drug that reduces the injury and inflammation caused by mechanical stresses.”

The research is published today (Jan. 12, 2021) in Nature Communications.

Though a therapy for humans is years away, the progress comes at a time when more patients than ever before are requiring mechanical ventilation: Cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have skyrocketed because of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. ARDS is one of the most frequent causes of respiratory failure that leads to putting patients on a ventilator.

“Before COVID, there were several hundred thousand cases of ARDS in the United States each year, most of which required mechanical ventilation. But in the past year there have been 21 million COVID-19 patients at risk,” said Englert, a physician who treats ICU patients.

The immune response to ventilation and the inflammation that comes with it can add to fluid build-up and low oxygen levels in the lungs of patients already so sick that they require life support.

The molecule that lessens inflammation in response to mechanical ventilation is called microRNA-146a (miR-146a). MicroRNAs are small segments of RNA that inhibit genes’ protein-building functions — in this case, turning off the production of proteins that promote inflammation.

The researchers found that immune cells in the lungs called alveolar macrophages — whose job is to protect the lungs from infection — activate miR-146a when they’re exposed to pressure that mimics mechanical ventilation. This action makes miR-146a part of the innate, or immediate, immune response launched by the body to begin its fight against what it is perceiving as an infection — the mechanical ventilation.

“This means an innate regulator of the immune system is activated by mechanical stress. That makes me think it’s there for a reason,” Ghadiali said. That reason, he said, is to help calm the inflammatory nature of the very immune response that is producing the microRNA.

The research team confirmed the moderate increase of miR-146a levels in alveolar macrophages in a series of tests on cells from donor lungs that were exposed to mechanical pressure and in mice on miniature ventilators. The lungs of genetically modified mice that lacked the microRNA were more heavily damaged by ventilation than lungs in normal mice — pointing to miR-146a’s protective role in lungs during mechanical breathing assistance. Finally, the researchers examined cells from lung fluid of ICU patients on ventilators and found miR-146a levels in their immune cells were increased as well.

The problem: The expression of miR-146a under normal circumstances isn’t high enough to stop lung damage from prolonged ventilation.

The intended therapy would be introducing much higher levels of miR-146a directly to the lungs to ward off inflammation that can lead to injury. When overexpression of miR-146a was prompted in cells that were then exposed to mechanical stress, inflammation was reduced.

To test the treatment in mice on ventilators, the team delivered nanoparticles containing miR-146a directly to mouse lungs — which resulted in a 10,000-fold increase in the molecule that reduced inflammation and kept oxygen levels normal. In the lungs of ventilated mice that received “placebo” nanoparticles, the increase in miR-146a was modest and offered little protection.

From here, the team is testing the effects of manipulating miR-146a levels in other cell types — these functions can differ dramatically, depending on each cell type’s job.

“In my mind, the next step is demonstrating how to use this technology as a precision tool to target the cells that need it the most,” Ghadiali said.

The collaborative work by researchers in engineering, pulmonary medicine and drug delivery was conducted at Ohio State’s Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute (DHLRI), where Englert and Ghadiali have labs and teamed with Ohio State graduate students and co-first authors Christopher Bobba from the MD/PhD training program and Qinqin Fei from the College of Pharmacy to lead the studies.

Additional Ohio State co-authors include DHLRI investigators Vasudha Shukla, Hyunwook Lee, Pragi Patel, Mark Wewers, John Christman and Megan Ballinger; Carleen Spitzer and MuChun Tsai of the College of Medicine; and Robert Lee of the College of Pharmacy. Rachel Putman of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston also worked on the study.

The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense, and an Ohio State Presidential Fellowship.

Boosting a natural cellular process could lower ventilator-related lung damage

Boosting a natural cellular process could lower ventilator-related lung damage

  • January 12, 2021

An unfortunate truth about the use of mechanical ventilation to save the lives of patients in respiratory distress is that the pressure used to inflate the lungs is likely to cause further lung damage.

In a new study, scientists identified a molecule that is produced by immune cells during mechanical ventilation to try to decrease inflammation, but isn’t able to completely prevent ventilator-induced injury to the lungs.

The team is working on exploiting that natural process in pursuit of a therapy that could lower the chances for lung damage in patients on ventilators. Delivering high levels of the helpful molecule with a nanoparticle was effective at fending off ventilator-related lung damage in mice on mechanical ventilation.

Our data suggest that the lungs know they’re not supposed to be overinflated in this way, and the immune system does its best to try to fix it, but unfortunately it’s not enough. How can we exploit this response and take what nature has done and augment that? That led to the therapeutic aims in this study.”


Dr. Joshua A. Englert, Study Co-lead Author, Assistant Professor, Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, The Ohio State University, Wexner Medical Center

The work builds upon findings from the lab of co-lead author Samir Ghadiali, professor and chair of biomedical engineering at Ohio State, who for years has studied how the physical force generated during mechanical ventilation activates inflammatory signaling and causes lung injury.

Efforts in other labs to engineer ventilation systems that could reduce harm to the lungs haven’t panned out, Ghadiali said.

“We haven’t found ways to ventilate patients in a clinical setting that completely eliminates the injurious mechanical forces,” he said. “The alternative is to use a drug that reduces the injury and inflammation caused by mechanical stresses.”

The research is published today (Jan. 12, 2021) in Nature Communications.

Though a therapy for humans is years away, the progress comes at a time when more patients than ever before are requiring mechanical ventilation: Cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have skyrocketed because of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. ARDS is one of the most frequent causes of respiratory failure that leads to putting patients on a ventilator.

“Before COVID, there were several hundred thousand cases of ARDS in the United States each year, most of which required mechanical ventilation. But in the past year there have been 21 million COVID-19 patients at risk,” said Englert, a physician who treats ICU patients.

The immune response to ventilation and the inflammation that comes with it can add to fluid build-up and low oxygen levels in the lungs of patients already so sick that they require life support.

The molecule that lessens inflammation in response to mechanical ventilation is called microRNA-146a (miR-146a). MicroRNAs are small segments of RNA that inhibit genes’ protein-building functions – in this case, turning off the production of proteins that promote inflammation.

The researchers found that immune cells in the lungs called alveolar macrophages – whose job is to protect the lungs from infection – activate miR-146a when they’re exposed to pressure that mimics mechanical ventilation. This action makes miR-146a part of the innate, or immediate, immune response launched by the body to begin its fight against what it is perceiving as an infection – the mechanical ventilation.

“This means an innate regulator of the immune system is activated by mechanical stress. That makes me think it’s there for a reason,” Ghadiali said. That reason, he said, is to help calm the inflammatory nature of the very immune response that is producing the microRNA.

The research team confirmed the moderate increase of miR-146a levels in alveolar macrophages in a series of tests on cells from donor lungs that were exposed to mechanical pressure and in mice on miniature ventilators. The lungs of genetically modified mice that lacked the microRNA were more heavily damaged by ventilation than lungs in normal mice – pointing to miR-146a’s protective role in lungs during mechanical breathing assistance. Finally, the researchers examined cells from lung fluid of ICU patients on ventilators and found miR-146a levels in their immune cells were increased as well.

The problem: The expression of miR-146a under normal circumstances isn’t high enough to stop lung damage from prolonged ventilation.

The intended therapy would be introducing much higher levels of miR-146a directly to the lungs to ward off inflammation that can lead to injury. When overexpression of miR-146a was prompted in cells that were then exposed to mechanical stress, inflammation was reduced.

To test the treatment in mice on ventilators, the team delivered nanoparticles containing miR-146a directly to mouse lungs – which resulted in a 10,000-fold increase in the molecule that reduced inflammation and kept oxygen levels normal. In the lungs of ventilated mice that received “placebo” nanoparticles, the increase in miR-146a was modest and offered little protection.

From here, the team is testing the effects of manipulating miR-146a levels in other cell types – these functions can differ dramatically, depending on each cell type’s job.

“In my mind, the next step is demonstrating how to use this technology as a precision tool to target the cells that need it the most,” Ghadiali said.

Source:

Journal reference:

Bobba, C.M., et al. (2021) Nanoparticle delivery of microRNA-146a regulates mechanotransduction in lung macrophages and mitigates injury during mechanical ventilation. Nature Communications. doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-20449-w.

Hospital Ventilator

Boosting a Natural Cellular Process to Protect Lungs From Ventilator-Induced Injury

  • January 12, 2021

Hospital Ventilator

Research Suggests Boosting a Natural Cellular Process Could Reduce Damage

An unfortunate truth about the use of mechanical ventilation to save the lives of patients in respiratory distress is that the pressure used to inflate the lungs is likely to cause further lung damage.

In a new study, scientists identified a molecule that is produced by immune cells during mechanical ventilation to try to decrease inflammation, but isn’t able to completely prevent ventilator-induced injury to the lungs.

The team is working on exploiting that natural process in pursuit of a therapy that could lower the chances for lung damage in patients on ventilators. Delivering high levels of the helpful molecule with a nanoparticle was effective at fending off ventilator-related lung damage in mice on mechanical ventilation.

“Our data suggest that the lungs know they’re not supposed to be overinflated in this way, and the immune system does its best to try to fix it, but unfortunately it’s not enough,” said Dr. Joshua A. Englert, assistant professor of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and co-lead author of the study. “How can we exploit this response and take what nature has done and augment that? That led to the therapeutic aims in this study.”

The work builds upon findings from the lab of co-lead author Samir Ghadiali, professor and chair of biomedical engineering at Ohio State, who for years has studied how the physical force generated during mechanical ventilation activates inflammatory signaling and causes lung injury.

Efforts in other labs to engineer ventilation systems that could reduce harm to the lungs haven’t panned out, Ghadiali said.

“We haven’t found ways to ventilate patients in a clinical setting that completely eliminates the injurious mechanical forces,” he said. “The alternative is to use a drug that reduces the injury and inflammation caused by mechanical stresses.”

The research is published today (January 12, 2021) in Nature Communications.

Though a therapy for humans is years away, the progress comes at a time when more patients than ever before are requiring mechanical ventilation: Cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have skyrocketed because of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. ARDS is one of the most frequent causes of respiratory failure that leads to putting patients on a ventilator.

“Before COVID, there were several hundred thousand cases of ARDS in the United States each year, most of which required mechanical ventilation. But in the past year there have been 21 million COVID-19 patients at risk,” said Englert, a physician who treats ICU patients.

The immune response to ventilation and the inflammation that comes with it can add to fluid build-up and low oxygen levels in the lungs of patients already so sick that they require life support.

The molecule that lessens inflammation in response to mechanical ventilation is called microRNA-146a (miR-146a). MicroRNAs are small segments of RNA that inhibit genes’ protein-building functions — in this case, turning off the production of proteins that promote inflammation.

The researchers found that immune cells in the lungs called alveolar macrophages — whose job is to protect the lungs from infection — activate miR-146a when they’re exposed to pressure that mimics mechanical ventilation. This action makes miR-146a part of the innate, or immediate, immune response launched by the body to begin its fight against what it is perceiving as an infection — the mechanical ventilation.

“This means an innate regulator of the immune system is activated by mechanical stress. That makes me think it’s there for a reason,” Ghadiali said. That reason, he said, is to help calm the inflammatory nature of the very immune response that is producing the microRNA.

The research team confirmed the moderate increase of miR-146a levels in alveolar macrophages in a series of tests on cells from donor lungs that were exposed to mechanical pressure and in mice on miniature ventilators. The lungs of genetically modified mice that lacked the microRNA were more heavily damaged by ventilation than lungs in normal mice — pointing to miR-146a’s protective role in lungs during mechanical breathing assistance. Finally, the researchers examined cells from lung fluid of ICU patients on ventilators and found miR-146a levels in their immune cells were increased as well.

The problem: The expression of miR-146a under normal circumstances isn’t high enough to stop lung damage from prolonged ventilation.

The intended therapy would be introducing much higher levels of miR-146a directly to the lungs to ward off inflammation that can lead to injury. When overexpression of miR-146a was prompted in cells that were then exposed to mechanical stress, inflammation was reduced.

To test the treatment in mice on ventilators, the team delivered nanoparticles containing miR-146a directly to mouse lungs — which resulted in a 10,000-fold increase in the molecule that reduced inflammation and kept oxygen levels normal. In the lungs of ventilated mice that received “placebo” nanoparticles, the increase in miR-146a was modest and offered little protection.

From here, the team is testing the effects of manipulating miR-146a levels in other cell types — these functions can differ dramatically, depending on each cell type’s job.

“In my mind, the next step is demonstrating how to use this technology as a precision tool to target the cells that need it the most,” Ghadiali said.

Reference: 12 January 2021, Nature Communications.
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-020-20449-w

The collaborative work by researchers in engineering, pulmonary medicine and drug delivery was conducted at Ohio State’s Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute (DHLRI), where Englert and Ghadiali have labs and teamed with Ohio State graduate students and co-first authors Christopher Bobba from the MD/PhD training program and Qinqin Fei from the College of Pharmacy to lead the studies.

Additional Ohio State co-authors include DHLRI investigators Vasudha Shukla, Hyunwook Lee, Pragi Patel, Mark Wewers, John Christman and Megan Ballinger; Carleen Spitzer and MuChun Tsai of the College of Medicine; and Robert Lee of the College of Pharmacy. Rachel Putman of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston also worked on the study.

The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense, and an Ohio State Presidential Fellowship.

Boosting the Immune System During COVID-19 and Beyond

Boosting the Immune System During COVID-19 and Beyond

  • January 11, 2021

The coronavirus has spread throughout the United States, and health professionals are providing numerous recommendations related to social distancing, hand hygiene, and wearing masks. There are currently no medications or treatments for COVID-19, but a couple of vaccines are becoming available.

Despite the coronavirus raging across the globe, one missing element from the mainstream media is how to boost the immune system, whose job is to protect us against harmful substances and germs. The better it can do its job, the healthier we will be. Let’s explore how to keep our immune systems healthy during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

Adequate Vitamin D

This fat-soluble vitamin is a hormone our bodies produce in response to the sun. Vitamin D is critical for a healthy immune system and bone health. Unfortunately, studies show that 42% of the population is deficient. This is especially common in colder or cloudy climates and in individuals with darker skin. For example, studies show that Blacks — and to a lesser extent, Latinos — have higher instances of Vitamin D deficiency than their white counterparts.

Some foods contain Vitamin D, and our bodies can produce it when in the presence of sunlight. Typically, diet alone is not sufficient, and supplementing is recommended. The National Institutes of Health recommends supplementing with 600 IUs for youth and adults and 800 IUs for seniors over 70 years of age. However, recommendations vary for optimum health, with some considerably higher. Also, exposure to sunlight helps boost Vitamin D levels. Unfortunately, this can be difficult in cold climates when the skin is covered and the sun is relatively weak.

Balanced & Healthy Diet

As we all know, a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables promotes health. Specifically, there is also evidence that zinc, selenium, iron, copper, folic acid, and vitamins A, B6, C, and E impact our immune systems. Avoid fried and processed foods and eat a variety of nutrient-dense foods.

healthy young woman cutting up fresh pear

A healthy diet and regular exercise help keep your immune system healthy. Photo courtesy of Nathan Cowley, Pexels

Restful Sleep

In 1910, most people slept nine hours per night. Now, 40% of adults in the U.S. report getting less than six hours each night. About 30% to 40% of people in the U.S. report experiencing insomnia each year. The trend of inadequate sleep seems to be increasing over time. Although many of us are aware of the importance of sleep, we just don’t get enough of it.

There are many things we can do to embrace sound sleep. One of the most crucial steps is to acknowledge its importance and make restful sleep a priority.

Create a sleep routine and try to go to bed and wake up at roughly the same time each day. Ensure the bedroom is dark while you sleep and avoid electronic screens before bed. Don’t eat large meals or drink alcohol late at night. Relax before going to bed, allowing yourself to unwind. Make sure that your pillows and mattress are comfortable for your body type and sleep position.

Proper Hydration

Because every cell, tissue, and organ in our bodies relies on proper hydration, it is essential to immune health. How much water we need depends on our level of activity, body size, climate, diet, and other factors. Although there is no agreed-upon recommendation for water intake, some sources recommend eight glasses a day. One way to ensure you are adequately hydrated is to drink enough water that your urine is clear and you don’t feel thirsty.

Reduce Stress

Because of the strong mind-body connection, stress has a significant impact on our overall health. Although some stress is unavoidable, establish healthy habits to help combat it. Regular exercise, yoga, meditation, vibrant friendships, laughter, and creative outlets are all helpful. Likewise, it’s crucial to avoid factors that increase stress, such as toxic relationships and overspending.

Gut Health

There is an increasing body of evidence that our gut health shapes our physical health. Our microbiome can impact mental health, body weight, immune health, and the prevalence of disease. Some of the factors that impact gut health are listed above, such as reducing stress, adequate hydration, regular exercise, and eating a balanced diet. Also, eating a prebiotic and probiotic-rich diet can help.

Probiotics are microorganisms that can improve gut flora while inhibiting unhealthy bacteria. Prebiotics help increase the growth and activity of probiotics. Thus, it’s helpful to have the two combined for a balanced gut.

Prebiotic-rich foods include onions, garlic, asparagus, oats, apples, flaxseeds, seaweed, and dandelion greens. Probiotic-rich foods include raw kimchi, sauerkraut, kombucha, yogurt (with active or live cultures), kefir, pickles (not containing vinegar), and miso. Also, taking a probiotic supplement can be helpful.

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Amazing Benefits of Chyavanaprasam for Boosting Immunity and Vitality

Amazing Benefits of Chyavanaprasam for Boosting Immunity and Vitality

  • January 10, 2021






Kundan Ayurveda
Ayurveda






Chyavanaprasam is the medicine used by Chyavana Maharshi to maintain youth.  It is a collection of 49 Ayurvedic medicines.  The advantage of this is that it can maintain the youth of the body if eaten properly.













It is a drug that contains a lot of antioxidants.  The main ingredient is gooseberry.  This is why it tastes a little bitter.  Chyvanaprasam should be taken with milk 20 minutes before breakfast and after dinner.  To get the full benefits of the medicine, it should be taken with milk. This combination is very good for health as milk and gooseberry are rich in Vitamin-C.

This Ayurvedic medicine is good for asthma, allergies and bone strength. Vitamin C in gooseberry and milk, which are important ingredients in it, helps to strengthen bones.  This is also a remedy for premature graying.  The presence of gooseberry is the reason for this quality.













Chyavanaprasam can help rejuvenate the body by preventing wrinkles and sagging skin caused by aging.  It also plays an important role in boosting the body’s immune system.  This Siddha medicine has been used by the Indians since ancient times.

Giving children Chyavanaprasam will help them to improve their learning.  This is because of the fact that the medicine contains multiple drugs that can enhance memory.

Gooseberry is rich in fiber and stimulates the digestive system.  In addition, it is a remedy for acidity, constipation and flatulence.













Chewing gum has the ability to provide more iron to the body.  Therefore, it is recommended to prevent anemia and increase blood flow.  Chewing gum also has the ability to remove toxins from the body.  This medicine can be used to maintain a healthy body weight.  The fear of gaining weight by consuming this is unnecessary.







Fewer Americans are resolving to diet in 2021, opting instead for simpler fare & immunity boosting products

Fewer Americans are resolving to diet in 2021, opting instead for simpler fare & immunity boosting products

  • January 6, 2021

This shift could dampen the typical short-term sales lifts typical of Q1 for brands making specific diet-related claims, or offering “restrictive” alternatives to conventional foods – such as low-carb bread replacements or keto desserts that skip the sugar in favor of permitted alternative sweeteners.

On the flip side, Americans’ decision to skip diet-related New Year’s resolutions could be related to the longer-term trend to eat healthier and seek products with immunity boosting claims inspired by the ongoing pandemic.

According to IFIC, only about 15% of Americans plan to make food or beverage resolutions in 2021 – that’s nearly three times less than what was reported in early 2020, Megan Meyer, director of science communications at IFIC, told FoodNavigator-USA.

“Given this statistic as well as data from previous surveys​, this seems to suggest that Americans aren’t as interested in fad diets or being as restrictive with food as they may have been in pas years,”​ she explained.

“Instead,”​ she added, “we anticipate that Americans will be focusing more on their general health, with more simple and sustainable approaches.”

This could be because many Americans have either already adopted healthier eating patterns as a way to protect themselves against the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, or because they are exhausted from cooking and baking more during the past 10 months of the pandemic – whether for entertainment or out of necessity with restaurants shuttered or severely restricted and offices and schools closed.

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