Mynomx Pioneers the Personalization Science of Food Nutrition to Prevent and Fight Onset of COVID-19

Mynomx Pioneers the Personalization Science of Food Nutrition to Prevent and Fight Onset of COVID-19

  • May 29, 2020

PALO ALTO, Calif.–()–Mynomx Inc. (formerly Precision Wellness, Inc.), a Silicon Valley-based company at the intersection of next-generation AI analytics and the latest medical and nutrition science, today announced their personalized nutrition approach to boosting cardio and metabolic health for disease prevention and immune system support.

The Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) has swept the world and struck those with underlying cardiometabolic syndrome: inflammation, hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disorders, the hardest. The incidence and prevalence of people with cardiometabolic syndromes are on the rise, with over 40% of the US population suffering from one form of cardiovascular disease, posing the greatest burden as the nation’s costliest chronic disease and number one killer.

It is clear a new approach to prevention is needed and one that involves proper nutritional interventions. Mynomx focuses on preventing the onset and progression of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, using food as medicine, through an AI-driven personalized nutrition approach designed to each person’s unique metabolism, biochemistry, health, and genetics.

“Expression of our genetic blueprint works hand-in-hand with our nutritional consumption to define our metabolism. The food that we eat directly affects the biochemical pathways that may result in a metabolic imbalance within every tissue and cell, including those of our immune system”, explains Dr. Mehrdad Rezaee, Interventional Cardiologist at Cardiac and Vascular Care, a clinical scientist and a Mynomx co-founder.

The Mynomx personalized nutrition approach is predicated on AI health predictive and food recommendation engines designed from the ground up to improve balance across those cardio and metabolic pillars of health that prevent the onset of inflammation, hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, and diabetes.

According to Dr. Rezaee, “Achieving metabolic balance leads to an efficient metabolism which is associated with increased energy levels, optimal weight, and a bolstered immune system that can remove toxins, fight bacteria and viruses, and help in preventing the onset and severity of disease, as well as the recovery from injuries.”

Unlike other food platforms that only score the quality of food without the knowledge of a person’s true state of health, Mynomx’s personalized nutrition platform connects food, nutrition, and health at the molecular level to provide precision nutrition food scoring and recommendations based on a person’s unique biology and health.

Each person’s unique health and biochemistry requires different nutrients, restrictions, and sensitivities that define their personalized dietary pattern. Mynomx combines this pattern with an individual’s preference, to produce a curated list of foods ranked based on this precision nutrition score.

“We believe we can profoundly improve the health of our communities through actionable health insights and recommendations that use food-as-medicine personalized to bolster each person’s metabolic response,” explains Mynomx CEO Nazhin Zarghamee.

Mynomx AI applies this food scoring to whole foods, meals, packaged foods, restaurants, and recipes, to allow for healthy choices at the point of food shopping, meal selection, and meal planning decision making. Food retailers can use the Mynomx platform to build deeper personalization and engagement applications.

Mynomx’s outcome-driven approach is predicated around nutritional guidelines and patterns designed to boost metabolic functioning and fight COVID-19. Government and self-insured organizations can use Mynomx predictive analytics to understand the at-risk population and deliver personalized nutrition programs to drive population health, ensuring the health of our communities.

Mynomx health predictions (previously Precision Wellness) have been validated with the highest levels of accuracy across 2.8M patient populations in conjunction with leading institutions such as Stanford Medicine [or University] & Broad Institute (a Harvard, MIT, Massachusetts General Hospital Collaborative). Reference Publication.

About Mynomx

Mynomx is a leading scientific food personalization company that offers organizations and individuals an advanced, integrative approach to managing their health through personalized health insights and nutritional intervention. The data-driven Mynomx analytic platform, powered by the latest in nutritional science at the molecular level, multi-omics, and next-generation AI, offers the means to manage health through “food as medicine,” preventing disease and supporting healthy aging. In addition to serving individuals, our platform is ideal for insurance and self-insured organization, corporate wellness, testing, and diagnostic companies as well as food retailers who are seeking deeper personalization and engagement. To learn more, visit www.mynomx.com.

Dr Michael Mosley (pictured), who has penned a book offering advice on how to minimise your risk of complications if you contract covid-19, has shared a selection of healthy recipes that boost your immune system

Eat to combat corona: Staying one step ahead of the virus starts with your diet

  • May 29, 2020

The diet that could save your life:  His 5:2 and Fast 800 diets have helped millions to lose weight. Now, in his new book, Dr Michael Mosley reveals how his revolutionary approach to eating can combat coronavirus

The worldwide Covid-19 pandemic means life is going to be very different for all of us, with the spectre of infection and illness impacting everything we do. But I believe the best way to go forward without fear is to respect this deadly virus, follow all the guidance about social distancing and good old-fashioned hand washing. 

We should take whatever steps we can to shore up our immune systems so we can be in the best possible position to resist its invasion and fight its effects.

Until there are effective vaccines or treatments widely available, anyone who does come into contact with the virus is going to be heavily reliant on their immune system to keep Covid-19’s destructive forces at bay. 

Dr Michael Mosley (pictured), who has penned a book offering advice on how to minimise your risk of complications if you contract covid-19, has shared a selection of healthy recipes that boost your immune system

Dr Michael Mosley (pictured), who has penned a book offering advice on how to minimise your risk of complications if you contract covid-19, has shared a selection of healthy recipes that boost your immune system 

But luckily, there’s plenty of good evidence to show that there are steps we can take to support our immune systems now and for the long term. 

It’s nothing complex, painful or expensive. We just need to take heed of sensible evidence-based advice to shift excess weight, support our gut bacteria, reduce stress, be active and sleep well.

All of these have been shown in numerous studies to support your immune system, and I’m convinced that moving in this direction is one of the best ways to protect yourself against the ravages of the disease.

Delay breakfast to bolster your immunity 

Although a healthy breakfast is a great opportunity to boost your fruit and vegetable intake, you could speed your weight-loss success and also enhance your immune system by getting into a habit of intermittent fasting.

Studies show that stretching out the periods of time when your body doesn’t have to be involved with processing food gives it a chance to rest and repair, which is very useful for bolstering immunity. 

This also gives the lining of your gut, which takes a bashing during the day, more time to repair itself. It’s a bit like trying to repair a motorway; you can’t do it while cars are driving up and down in the day, so you have to wait till night-time and close it down. 

This process helps to reduce inflammation throughout the body (which is a sign of a malfunctioning immune system). You can choose one or both of these methods, which work well together:

  • 5:2 – cut your calorie intake to 800 on two days a week, then eat healthily on the other five days.
  • TRE or ‘time restricted eating’ – extend your natural night-time fast to 10-12 hours by eating within a restricted time window. Many people find the easiest way for this is to delay or even skip breakfast.

Today and all next week the Daily Mail is serialising my new book which is about Covid-19, and I will be giving detailed, research-based advice about the most effective ways to avoid it and minimise your risk of complications if you do contract the virus. 

The key is to ensure you are as healthy as you can be. That means keeping fit and, crucially, losing excess weight, since obesity and high blood sugar put extra pressure on the heart and lungs, which need to be strong to help when our immune system battles with the virus.

A healthy and active immune system is critical to fighting off the virus. Which could explain why older people are so much more vulnerable than the young. 

People like me, who are over 60, tend to have less efficient immune systems and, initially, may be slower to mount an adequate response. Paradoxically, later in the illness an older immune system can be prone to overreact, creating a surge of aggressive immune cells that can damage the lungs and other organs.

So your immune system faces a tricky balancing act. It has to respond to threats, but not go too far. 

However, it’s good to know there are lifestyle changes that can not only keep your immune system in good shape, but even turn back the clock – whatever your age. And the ideal way to effect good health fast is to address the way you eat.

Start by emptying your fridge of tempting junk food and fill it with fresh fruit, vegetables, yoghurt and lean protein.

If you also stock up with pulses and wholegrains, you’ll soon be ready to pile your plate with a super-nourishing assortment of meals packed with natural disease-fighting nutrients. 

The delicious recipes on these pages have been chosen from books written by me and my wife Dr Clare Bailey to help keep your weight steady, feed the beneficial bacteria in your gut, encourage restful sleep and have maximum impact on your health.

What’s so good about the Mediterranean diet?

I am a huge fan of the Mediterranean Diet, which is rich in healthy natural fats, nuts and fish, as well as veggies and legumes, all packed with disease-fighting vitamins and minerals. It’s how my wife and I eat at home – and I love it! A Mediterranean-style diet doesn’t just taste great. 

Stay away from processed food 

As well as eating to boost your immune system, it is important to avoid – if possible – habits which could be undermining your body’s ability to protect you. 

Smoking is an obvious one, and insufficient sleep is another. 

But you might not realise that eating processed and junk food, and sticking to a narrow range of your favourite foods (the same sandwich for lunch every day, regular takeaways, and the same meals night after night) can undermine your immune system at a time when you most need it to be working on your behalf.

Our gut bacteria don’t respond well to the artificial sweeteners, emulsifiers and additives which are packed into highly processed food to make the cheap ingredients palatable. 

Eating lots of sugary or processed foods will just reinforce and feed the ‘bad’, pro-inflammatory microbes that live in the gut and a healthy microbiome is crying out for variety. 

Many families eat from a limited repertoire of set meals with a boringly small range of ingredients. The problem is, the more limited the range of foods you eat, the more limited your bacterial diversity is likely to be. 

There has never been a better time to experiment with new foods and recipes. It’s not just delicious – it’s the best way to bolster your immunity!

There is so much solid scientific evidence that shows adopting this lifestyle will cut your risk of heart disease, cancer, Type 2 diabetes, depression and dementia – and it is also a key first step to boosting your protection against Covid-19.

Thanks to recent studies, we know it will improve your sleep and enhance the workings of your immune system. 

One reason this diet is so beneficial is its ability to calm the potentially destructive inflammation process in the body. This is very good news because many experts now believe that chronic inflammation plays an important role in determining who is most badly affected by Covid-19 and who escapes relatively unscathed. 

The foods in this diet, such as olive oil, oily fish, legumes and vegetables, contain anti-inflammatory compounds, such as oleic acid, omega-3 fatty acids and polyphenols. 

Reducing chronic inflammation will not just reduce your risk of heart disease and cancer, but it also means you are less likely to suffer that dangerous overreaction by the immune system to Covid-19 that leads to serious damage to vital organs and sometimes to death.

My low-ish carb Mediterranean diet is also a great way to control your weight, which is particularly important right now. If you have a large waist then you are at much greater risk of becoming seriously ill.

Why? It is partly because the more overweight you are, the lower your lung capacity. So if Covid-19 attacks your lungs, you are more likely to end up in intensive care.

Excess fat, particularly around the tummy, also increases chronic inflammation in your body, which in turn makes your immune response less efficient. 

Dr Michael (pictured) claims a Mediterranean diet can still bolster your immune defences - even if you don't have excess weight to lose

Dr Michael (pictured) claims a Mediterranean diet can still bolster your immune defences – even if you don’t have excess weight to lose

A large waist often goes hand in hand with raised blood sugar levels, and people with Type 2 diabetes or prediabetes (where blood sugars are raised but not yet in the diabetic range) tend to be more prone to infections and complications.

Next week in the Daily Mail I’ll detail one of the best – and safest – ways to lose excess weight and reduce your diabetes risk fast, with my Fast 800 plan (see thefast800.com). But even if you don’t have excess weight to lose, switching to a Mediterranean diet can still bolster your immune defences. 

What’s the difference between prebiotic and probiotic?

You can give your ‘good’ gut bacteria an extra boost by ensuring you eat lots of prebiotic and probiotic foods. 

A prebiotic is a special type of plant fibre (found in onions and leeks, asparagus, oats and bananas, for example), which your body struggles to digest but which acts like a fertiliser for your microbiome, encouraging the growth of ‘good’ bacteria in your gut. 

Probiotics are the live bacteria or yeast that you can parachute into your intestines (via yoghurt, cheese, sauerkraut or supplements), in the hope that they will take root and do you some good.

These foods naturally boost levels of the ‘good’ bacteria in your gut. We know these microbes can produce powerful anti-inflammatory agents, as well as compounds which help reduce anxiety and which play an essential role in the body’s immune response. 

Studies have shown changing the mix of bacteria in your gut can reduce the number of coughs and colds you get, as well as the impact of allergenic and autoimmune diseases.

Eating a wide range of different foods, which you will find in our recipes, will lead to a more diverse and resilient microbial gut community. 

That is because you will be feeding them with the sorts of foods they love. By avoiding sugar and junk food you can starve out ‘bad’ bacteria, and by filling your plate with delicious vegetables, pulses and wholegrains you can create the best possible environment for ‘good’ bacteria to thrive. 

BREAKFAST 

BLUEBERRY PANCAKES

This delicious blueberry pancake recipe is a healthy weekend treat that can be garnished with the remaining berries

This delicious blueberry pancake recipe is a healthy weekend treat that can be garnished with the remaining berries 

A weekend treat, which can be multiplied to serve all the family. Use rolled porridge oats, instead of jumbo, for the best results.

Cook’s tip

If you’re making this for one, keep the other pancakes for the next day. Microwave on high, on a plate covered with cling film, for 30 seconds

Serves 2 l 284cals per serving

  • 75g (2¾oz) wholemeal self-raising flour
  • 15g (½oz) rolled porridge oats (not jumbo)
  • 1 large egg
  • 100ml (3½fl oz) full-fat milk
  • 125g (4½oz) blueberries
  • 2tsp rapeseed or coconut oil

Place the flour and rolled oats in a bowl, make a well in the centre and break the egg into it. Pour in half the milk and, using a whisk, beat it all together to form a thick batter.

Add the remaining milk and beat hard, until the batter is smooth. Tip the blueberries into a separate bowl, keeping some aside for garnishing, and then lightly crush with the back of a spoon. Add them to the batter and mix well. Brush a large non-stick frying pan with a little of the oil and place over a mediumhigh heat. 

Spoon a sixth of the batter in a loose heap on one side of the pan and allow to spread gently. Add two more spoonfuls in the same way. Cook for 2 minutes, or until small bubbles appear on the surface and the top is beginning to set. 

Carefully flip the pancakes over and cook on the other side for 1½-2 minutes. Transfer the pancakes to a warmed plate and cook the remaining three pancakes in the same way. Serve with the reserved blueberries on the top as a garnish.

ASPARAGUS & FETA MUFFINS

These glorious asparagus and feta muffins are ideal for a healthy brunch and can be enjoyed either warm or cold

These glorious asparagus and feta muffins are ideal for a healthy brunch and can be enjoyed either warm or cold 

A delicious, healthy brunch. Serve warm or cold.

Serves 6 l 154cals per serving

Cook’s tip 

Choose young asparagus that isn’t too thick – if you do end up with thicker stems, cut them in half lengthways before slicing

  • 2tsp olive or rapeseed oil
  • 150g (5½oz) slender asparagus, trimmed and each stem cut into 2-3cm pieces
  • 100g (3½oz) frozen peas
  • 4 spring onions, trimmed and thinly sliced
  • 3-4tbsp finely chopped fresh mint
  • 6 large eggs
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 65g (2¼oz) feta, broken into small chunks

Preheat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas 6 and generously oil a deep, 6-hole muffin tin. Cut 6 pieces of non-stick baking paper (roughly 10cm squared) and use to line the tins, leaving the excess sticking out over the sides.

Pour water into a large pan until it’s a third full, then bring to the boil. Add the asparagus and cook for 4 minutes. Add the peas and cook for 1 minute. Drain well and tip into a bowl with the spring onions and mint. 

Beat the eggs in a separate bowl with a good pinch of salt and lots of black pepper. Divide the vegetables between the 6 muffin cases and top with the chunks of feta. 

Pour the egg over the vegetables then bake in the preheated oven for about 20 minutes, or until puffed up and light golden brown.

SMOKED SALMON OMELETTE WITH CHIVES

This splendid smoked salmon omelette with chives can be paired with a mixed salad for a nutritious morning meal

This splendid smoked salmon omelette with chives can be paired with a mixed salad for a nutritious morning meal

The butter adds richness to the omelette, but you could just use the oil if you prefer. Serve with a mixed salad.

Serves 1 l 339cals per serving

  • 2 large eggs
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1tsp butter
  • 1tsp olive oil
  • 50g (1¾oz) smoked salmon slices, cut into thin strips
  • Fresh chives, snipped, to serve (optional)

Break the eggs into a bowl and whisk, then season with pepper. Melt the butter with the oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over a medium heat. Pour the eggs into the pan and cook for a few seconds. 

Using a wooden spoon, draw the egg in from the sides towards the centre and let the uncooked egg run to fill its place. Repeat several times. 

Sprinkle with the salmon and cook for 1-2 minutes, or until the omelette is lightly browned underneath and just set on top. Slide onto a plate, fold and sprinkle with chives, if using.

CHOCOLATE GRANOLA

This delicious chocolate granola recipe is the perfect alternative to sugary cereals and is full of fibre

This delicious chocolate granola recipe is the perfect alternative to sugary cereals and is full of fibre 

This easy breakfast is filling and full of fibre – a wonderful alternative to sugary cereals.

Serves 8 l 274cals per serving

  • 4tbsp coconut oil
  • 1tbsp cocoa powder
  • 1tbsp maple syrup
  • 200g (7oz) jumbo porridge oats
  • 100g (3½oz) mixed nuts, roughly chopped
  • 75ml (2½fl oz) full-fat milk (per serving)

Preheat the oven to 170°C/fan 150°C/gas 3. Melt the coconut oil with the cocoa powder and maple syrup in a large non-stick saucepan over a gentle heat, making sure you stir regularly. 

Remove from the heat and stir the oats in until coated. Scatter over a baking tray and bake for 15 minutes. Remove the tray from the oven and stir the nuts in. Return to the oven for a further 10 minutes. 

Remove from the oven and leave to cool and crisp up on the tray. Serve 40g granola with 75ml full-fat milk per person. Store any leftover granola in an airtight jar for up to 2 weeks.

STRAWBERRY AND VANILLA YOGHURT

This scrumptious strawberry and vanilla yoghurt recipe is ideal for a healthy breakfast or dessert

This scrumptious strawberry and vanilla yoghurt recipe is ideal for a healthy breakfast or dessert 

A super-easy yoghurt for a great breakfast or dessert. Strawberries have a natural sweetness but are low in sugar.

Cook’s tip 

Use frozen strawberries or mixed berries instead, just make sure they are well thawed and drained before you mash them

Serves 4 l 123cals per serving

  • 250g (9oz) fresh strawberries, hulled and halved
  • 300g (10½oz) full-fat live Greek yoghurt
  • ½tsp vanilla extract

Place the fresh strawberries in a mixing bowl and mash them to crush the berries and release their juices. Mix the Greek yoghurt and vanilla extract in a separate bowl, then gently fold the mashed strawberries and their juices into it. Divide between 4 small dishes or glasses, and keep chilled until ready to serve.

POACHED EGGS WITH MUSHROOMS & SPINACH

This glorious low-calorie poached eggs with mushroom and spinach is a hearty dish for a filling breakfast

This glorious low-calorie poached eggs with mushroom and spinach is a hearty dish for a filling breakfast

A quick, low-calorie but filling breakfast for one.

Serves 1 l 241cals per serving

  • 2 medium eggs, fridge-cold
  • 1tsp butter or olive oil
  • 75g (2¾oz) small chestnut mushrooms, sliced
  • A large handful of young spinach leaves
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Pour water into a saucepan until it’s a third full, then bring to a gentle simmer. Break each egg into a cup, then carefully tip one at a time into the pan. 

Cook the eggs over a very low heat, with the water hardly bubbling, for about 3 minutes, or until the whites are set but the yolks remain runny.

While the eggs are poaching, melt the butter or oil in a non-stick frying pan over a medium heat and stir-fry the mushrooms for 2-3 minutes, or until lightly browned. Add the spinach leaves and toss until just wilted. 

Don’t over-cook them or lots of liquid will be released. Season with a pinch of salt and a good grinding of black pepper. Spoon the mushrooms and spinach on to a warmed plate. 

Drain the eggs using a slotted spoon and place on top of the vegetables. Season with a little more ground black pepper to serve.

LUNCH

SALMON SALAD BOWL

This delicious salmon salad bowl is filled with nutritious ingredients for a healthy lunch or supper

This delicious salmon salad bowl is filled with nutritious ingredients for a healthy lunch or supper

Serve this salad warm as a nutritious and filling lunch or supper.

Cook’s tip

Make the full amount of this recipe, even if you only need one serving, as the rest will keep well in the fridge to have the next day

Serves 2 l 542cals per serving

  • 25g (1oz) wholegrain brown rice, or brown and wild rice mix
  • 75g (2¾oz) frozen edamame beans or frozen peas
  • 2 x 120g (4½oz) salmon fillets
  • 1tsp sesame seeds
  • A pinch of crushed dried chilli flakes (optional)
  • 2 large handfuls of young spinach leaves or mixed baby salad leaves
  • ½ a medium avocado, stoned, peeled and chopped
  • 1 medium carrot, trimmed and coarsely grated
  • 2 spring onions, trimmed and finely sliced
  • 4 radishes, trimmed and sliced
  • Lime wedges, to serve

For the soy and lime dressing

  • 2tbsp dark soy sauce
  • 1tbsp sesame oil
  • 1tsp fresh lime juice
  • 1tsp runny honey

Preheat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas 6. Line a small baking tray with foil. Half-fill a small saucepan with water and bring to the boil. Add the rice and cook for about 20 minutes, or until tender. 

Add the edamame beans or peas and return the pan to the boil, stirring. Drain immediately. To make the dressing, combine the soy sauce, sesame oil, lime juice and runny honey together in a small bowl and whisk well.

Place the salmon skin-side down on the tray and drizzle with 2tsp of the dressing. Sprinkle with the sesame seeds and chilli flakes, if using. 

Bake for 10-12 minutes, or until just cooked. It is ready when the salmon easily flakes into large pieces when prodded with a fork.

Divide the leaves, cooked rice and beans or peas between 2 bowls. Arrange the avocado, carrot, spring onions and radishes alongside. Flake the salmon into the bowl as well (leaving behind the skin). 

Drizzle with the rest of the soy and lime dressing and serve with some lime wedges on the side, for squeezing over.

MINUTE STEAK AND CRUNCHY COLESLAW

This steak and crunchy coleslaw dish is a healthy and nutritious meal that can be served with nuts or feta

This steak and crunchy coleslaw dish is a healthy and nutritious meal that can be served with nuts or feta

You could convert this light lunch into a more substantial meal by adding a handful of nuts or feta.

Serves 2 l 430cals per serving

  • 2 small steaks, such as skirt or sirloin, beaten thinner
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper, or steak seasoning
  • ½ a small red cabbage, outer leaves removed
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 red apple
  • 4 spring onions, finely sliced
  • 1tbsp cider vinegar 
  • 2tbsp mayonnaise
  • 1tbsp olive oil

Season the steaks with salt and black pepper or a sprinkle of steak seasoning. For the slaw, finely shred the cabbage and place in a bowl. Grate the carrot and apple in and add the spring onions. 

Whisk together the vinegar, mayonnaise and oil, then stir this through the cabbage mixture. Heat a griddle pan and cook the steaks to your liking. Slice diagonally and serve with the coleslaw on the side.

PRAWNS & RED CABBAGE ON SOURDOUGH

This delicious prawns and red cabbage on sourdough meal is a tasty dish that is best served with black pepper

This delicious prawns and red cabbage on sourdough meal is a tasty dish that is best served with black pepper

Prawns and slaw on sourdough is a gut-friendly winner – easy to make and tasty, too. Sourdough is one of the healthiest breads, made using slow fermentation, so it’s easier to digest and less likely to cause a spike in blood sugar.

Serves 2 l 270cals per serving

  • 100g (3½oz) red cabbage, trimmed and very finely sliced
  • 1 small carrot, scrubbed well and coarsely grated
  • 1tbsp mixed seeds
  • 2 slices of sourdough bread (around 40g/1½oz each slice)
  • A small handful of fresh watercress or mixed baby salad leaves (around 20g/¾oz)
  • 75g (2¾oz) cooked and peeled prawns, thawed and drained if frozen
  • Freshly ground black pepper

For the dressing

  • 2tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1tsp fresh lemon juice, plus extra
  • ½tsp Dijon mustard
  • ½tsp runny honey (optional)

To make the dressing, whisk together the olive oil, lemon juice, Dijon mustard and honey, if using, in a large bowl. Add the red cabbage, carrot and mixed seeds and toss together to make a slaw.

Put each slice of sourdough bread on a plate and top with the watercress or salad leaves. 

Spoon some red cabbage slaw on top, then scatter with the prawns. Squeeze over a little extra lemon juice and season with freshly ground black pepper to serve.

SATAY CHICKEN KEBABS 

This tasty satay chicken kebabs recipe is a healthy lunchtime meal that can be enjoyed with fresh rocket and satay sauce

This tasty satay chicken kebabs recipe is a healthy lunchtime meal that can be enjoyed with fresh rocket and satay sauce

This is an irresistible, exotic south-east Asian mix.

Serves 2 l 460cals per serving

  • 2 skinless chicken breasts
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • ½ a red chilli, deseeded and chopped
  • 2tbsp soy sauce
  • 1tbsp coconut oil
  • 6 wooden skewers, soaked in water
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Rocket leaves

For the satay sauce

  • 2tbsp coconut oil
  • 2 spring onions, diced
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • ½ a red chilli, deseeded and chopped
  • 3tbsp peanut butter
  • ½tbsp fish sauce
  • 100ml (3½fl oz) coconut milk

Slice each chicken breast into 3 long strips and then dice each strip, aiming to get 12-15 cubes from each breast. Make a marinade by mixing together the garlic and chilli, soy sauce and coconut oil in a bowl.

Toss the chicken in the marinade until well coated. Cover with cling film and refrigerate overnight. 

When you are ready, thread 4 or 5 cubes onto each wooden skewer, season with salt and black pepper and place under a hot grill for 12-15 minutes, turning every 3-4 minutes.

Meanwhile, make the satay sauce. Put a pan on a medium heat, add the coconut oil and fry the spring onions, garlic and chilli for 3-4 minutes, until soft. Add the peanut butter and fish sauce and keep stirring for 2 minutes.

Transfer to a food processor, add the coconut milk and blend to a smooth paste. Taste and add a splash of soy sauce if you wish. Serve the kebabs with rocket and the satay sauce on the side.

ROASTED VEGETABLE PASTA

This delicious roasted vegetable pasta is a satisfying lunchtime meal that can be garnished with spinach

This delicious roasted vegetable pasta is a satisfying lunchtime meal that can be garnished with spinach

A comforting dish that’s a doddle to prepare. It is best cooked with bean, pea or lentil pasta, which is higher in protein and fibre and is found in most supermarkets – or use wholewheat penne.

Serves 2 l 460cals per serving

  • 2 peppers (any colour), deseeded and cut into roughly 2cm chunks
  • 1 medium courgette, trimmed, quartered lengthways and cut into roughly 2cm chunks
  • 1 large red onion, peeled and cut into 12 wedges
  • 2tbsp olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 12 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • ½tsp crushed dried chilli flakes (to taste)
  • 50g (1¾oz) dried bean, pea, lentil or wholewheat penne pasta
  • 50g (1¾oz) young spinach leaves
  • 125g (4½oz) mozzarella pearls (mini balls), drained and halved

Preheat the oven to 200°C/ fan 180°C/gas 6. Place the peppers, courgette and onion in a large baking tray. Drizzle with the oil, season with salt and lots of ground black pepper and toss. Roast for 20 minutes. 

Remove from the oven and turn all the vegetables. Add the tomatoes and sprinkle with chilli flakes. Cook for 10 minutes, or until lightly browned. 

Meanwhile, half-fill a medium saucepan with water and bring to the boil. Add the pasta and stir. Return to the boil and cook for 10-12 minutes, or until tender, stirring occasionally. Drain the pasta and return it to the pan. 

Add the spinach leaves, roasted vegetables and mozzarella pearls to the pan. Toss everything together and season with more black pepper. 

Cook the pasta for about 1 minute, stirring until the mozzarella pearls begin to melt and the spinach leaves wilt. Serve.

DINNER

LAMB SAAG & CAULIFLOWER RICE

This delicious lamb saag and cauliflower rice dish is the perfect alternative to a takeaway curry

This delicious lamb saag and cauliflower rice dish is the perfect alternative to a takeaway curry

A handy throw-it-alltogether curry that you can bung in the oven and forget about. Use a good-quality curry paste for the best results. Serve with cauliflower rice and a cucumber and red onion salad.

Serves 4 l 361cals per serving

HOW TO MAKE CAULIFLOWER RICE 

Makes 200g l 34cals per serving

Hold a small cauliflower by the stalk and coarsely grate to resemble grains of rice. You can also do this in a food processor but don’t let the pieces get too small or they will turn to a paste.

Either add the raw cauliflower rice to a stir-fry, or steam or sauté for 3-4 minutes. You can do this in the microwave – place in a microwaveproof bowl and cook on high for 2-3 minutes. 

The rice should retain a bit of bite, like al-dente pasta. Add chopped parsley or coriander, or fresh lemon juice for extra flavour

  • 1tbsp coconut or rapeseed oil
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and finely sliced
  • 500g (1lb 2oz) lamb neck fillets, trimmed and cut into roughly 3-4cm chunks
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 60g (around 4tbsp) medium Indian curry paste, such as rogan josh or tikka masala
  • 50g (1¾oz) dried red split lentils
  • 200g (7oz) frozen spinach

Preheat the oven to 180°C/fan 160°C/gas 4. Heat the oil in a flame-proof casserole dish and gently fry the onion for 5 minutes, or until softened and lightly browned.

Add the lamb pieces, season, and cook for 3 minutes, or until coloured on all sides, turning regularly. Stir in the curry paste and cook with the lamb and onion for 1 minute.

Add the lentils and spinach and stir in 500ml water. Bring to the boil, cover and cook in the oven for 1-1¼ hours, or until the lamb is tender and the sauce is thick.

JUICY BURGER WITH CELERIAC CHIPS

This juicy burger with celeriac chips is best served with a large mixed salad for a scrumptious dinner

This juicy burger with celeriac chips is best served with a large mixed salad for a scrumptious dinner 

Adding grated carrot to burgers makes them extra juicy and boosts the fibre. And with this low-carb recipe you still get to munch your chips. Serve the burgers with a large mixed salad.

Serves 4 l 259cals per serving

  • ½ a medium onion, peeled and coarsely grated or very finely chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and finely grated
  • 100g (3½oz) carrot (around 1 medium), trimmed and finely grated
  • 400g (14oz) lean minced beef (around 10% fat)
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • ½tsp dried mixed herbs

For the celeriac chips

  • 750g (1lb 10oz) celeriac, peeled (around 600g/1lb 5oz peeled weight)
  • 1tbsp olive or rapeseed oil

Preheat the oven to 220°C/fan 200°C/gas 7. To make the celeriac chips, carefully cut the celeriac into roughly 1.5cm slices and then into chips. Place in a bowl with the oil, a couple of pinches of sea salt and lots of ground black pepper. 

Toss well together. Scatter over a baking tray and bake for 20 minutes. Turn the chips and return to the oven for a further 5-10 minutes, or until tender and lightly browned.

Meanwhile, make the burgers. Put the onion, garlic, carrot, mince, ½tsp salt and dried mixed herbs in a bowl, season with lots of ground black pepper and combine thoroughly with your hands. Divide the mixture into 4 balls and flatten into burger shapes.

Make them a little flatter than you think they should be, as they will shrink as they cook.

Place a large non-stick frying pan over a medium heat and cook the burgers without extra fat for 10 minutes, or until lightly browned and cooked through, turning occasionally. Press every now and then with a spatula so they cook evenly.

Divide the chips between 4 warmed plates and serve a burger alongside, with some salad.

CHINESE-STYLE-GUT-SOOTHING CHICKEN BROTH   

This delicious Chinese-style-gut-soothing chicken broth is a heartwarming and nutritious dinner dish

This delicious Chinese-style-gut-soothing chicken broth is a heartwarming and nutritious dinner dish 

This anti-inflammatory broth is packed with vital nutrients.

Serves 4 (makes 1.5ltr) l 170cals per serving

  • 500g (1lb 2oz) organic chicken wings and/or leftover roasted chicken
  • 1 onion, peeled and quartered
  • 1 medium carrot, well scrubbed, trimmed, sliced
  • 2 sticks of celery, trimmed and cut into 2cm lengths
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled and halved
  • 50g (1¾oz) piece of root ginger, peeled and thinly sliced
  • ½tsp Chinese five-spice powder
  • Parsley, chopped (optional)

Place the chicken wings in a pan with the onion, carrot, celery, garlic, ginger and five- spice powder. (If using leftover roast chicken, discard any skin, take any meat off the bones and chill. 

Place the remaining carcass in the saucepan.) Pour in 2ltr cold water to cover the ingredients and cover with a lid. Place over a low heat, bring to a gentle simmer and cook for at least 4 hours (up to 6 hours). 

Skim off any foam that rises and top up the water, if needed. Ladle the stock through a fine sieve into a pan. 

Sprinkle with parsley, if using, and serve on its own or with the reserved meat. Cool completely before covering and placing in the fridge.

CHEAT’S CASSOULET

This splendid cheat's cassoulet is the ideal comfort food and can be served with green leafy vegetables

This splendid cheat’s cassoulet is the ideal comfort food and can be served with green leafy vegetables 

This is comfort food from France. Beans, like lentils, are a great source of fibre and have even been found to improve quality of sleep. Serve steaming hot with lots of green leafy veg.

Serves 4 l 445cals per serving

Cook’s tip 

Sprinkle each portion of your Bolognese with 10g freshly grated Parmesan cheese for an extra 41cals per serving

  • 1tbsp olive oil
  • 6 spicy sausages (around 400g/14oz), such as Toulouse or spicy pork
  • 1 large onion, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 100g (3½oz) cubed smoked lardons, pancetta or bacon
  • 1 x 400g tin haricot or cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 x 400g tin chopped tomatoes
  • 1tsp dried mixed herbs
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • A handful of spinach

Heat the oil in a wide-based, nonstick saucepan or flame-proof casserole, add the sausages and cook over a medium heat for about 5 minutes, or until browned on all sides, turning regularly. 

Remove from the pan and rest on a board.

Add the onion and lardons, pancetta or bacon to the pan and cook for 3-5 minutes, stirring, until golden. Cut the sausages in half if large and return them to the pan, and add the beans, tomatoes and herbs. 

Stir in 150ml water and bring to a gentle simmer. Cover loosely and cook for 18-20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add more water if the sauce thickens too much. Season to taste and stir in the spinach to wilt, then serve.

VEGGIE BOLOGNESE

This delicious veggie bolognese is a low calorie meal that will impress dinner guests when served with cooked courgetti

This delicious veggie bolognese is a low calorie meal that will impress dinner guests when served with cooked courgetti 

This Bolognese tastes really rich but is surprisingly low in calories. It was cooked for us by our son Dan and has become a favourite.

By baking the vegetables first, their flavour and texture is deliciously enhanced. Serve with freshly cooked courgetti.

Serves 4 l 207cals per serving

  • 1 red pepper, deseeded and cut into roughly 2cm chunks
  • 1 medium carrot, trimmed and cut into roughly 1.5cm chunks
  • 3tbsp olive oil
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 medium onions, peeled and finely chopped
  • 2 sticks of celery, trimmed and thinly sliced
  • 150g (5½oz) small chestnut mushrooms, sliced
  • 300g (10½oz) frozen Quorn mince
  • 75g (2¾oz) dried red split lentils
  • 1 large garlic clove, peeled and crushed 
  • 2 x 400g tins of chopped tomatoes
  • 1tsp dried oregano
  • 1 vegetable stock cube

To serve

  • 1 large courgette, trimmed and spiralised (or use a potato peeler) or 250g (9oz) readyprepared courgetti. Steam, boil or microwave the courgetti for about 1 minute, or until al dente

Preheat the oven to 220°C/fan 200°C/gas 7. Place the pepper and carrot on a baking tray and drizzle with 1tbsp of the olive oil. Season and toss. Bake for 15-20 minutes, or until softened and lightly browned. 

Meanwhile, heat the remaining oil in a deep frying pan or shallow flame-proof casserole and gently fry the onions, celery and mushrooms for 10 minutes, stirring regularly. Add the Quorn mince, lentils and garlic, and cook for 2 minutes more, stirring. 

Tip the tomatoes into the pan, sprinkle with the oregano and crumble the stock cube over. Add 300ml water, bring to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. 

Remove the tray from the oven and transfer the roasted veg to the pan. Return to a gentle simmer and cook for 15 minutes, or until the sauce is thick, stirring regularly. Adjust the seasoning to taste.

CREAMY CASHEW & TOFU CURRY

This delicious Thai-style creamy cashew and tofu curry is filled with aromatic flavours and can be served with cauliflower rice

This delicious Thai-style creamy cashew and tofu curry is filled with aromatic flavours and can be served with cauliflower rice

Thai-style curries always seem to go down well and this one is low on carbs and high in flavour. If you don’t like tofu, try Quorn pieces instead.

Serves 4 l 598cals per serving

  • 2tbsp coconut or rapeseed oil
  • 1 medium aubergine (around 225g/8oz), cut into roughly 2cm chunks
  • 1 medium red onion, peeled and cut into 12 wedges
  • 350g (12oz) butternut squash, peeled, deseeded and cut into roughly 2cm chunks
  • 4tbsp Thai red or green curry paste
  • 1 x 400ml tin full-fat coconut milk
  • 100g (3½oz) cashew nuts, roughly chopped
  • 1 large pepper (any colour), deseeded and cut into roughly 2cm chunks
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 20g (¾oz) fresh coriander, leaves roughly chopped
  • 280g (10oz) firm or extra-firm tofu, drained, cut into roughly 2cm cubes
  • 300g (10½oz) cauliflower rice 

Heat 1tbsp of the oil in a large pan or shallow casserole over a high heat. Add the aubergine and stir-fry for 4-5 minutes, until golden brown. Transfer to a bowl.

Reduce the heat, add the remaining oil, onion and squash to the pan and fry gently for 5 minutes, stirring regularly. Add the curry paste and cook for 1 minute, stirring constantly. 

Stir in the coconut milk, half the nuts, the pepper and 100ml water. Season with sea salt and ground black pepper. Cover the pan loosely with a lid, bring to a gentle simmer and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Stir the aubergine and half the coriander into the pan and return to a simmer. Add the tofu, cover and cook for a further 5-6 minutes, until the aubergine is softened and the tofu hot. 

Add a splash more water if the curry reduces too much. Sprinkle with the reserved coriander and cashew nuts, and serve with cauliflower rice, if using.

SESAME SALMON WITH BROCCOLI & TOMATOES

This delicious sesame salmon with broccoli and tomatoes is ideal for a speedy dinner dish

This delicious sesame salmon with broccoli and tomatoes is ideal for a speedy dinner dish  

If you don’t like salmon, any other chunky fish fillet will work here too.

Serves 2 l 403cals per serving

  • 2tsp olive or rapeseed oil
  • 2 x 125g (4½oz) salmon fillets
  • 6 spring onions, trimmed and each cut into 3
  • 12 cherry tomatoes
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 200g (7oz) long-stemmed broccoli, trimmed
  • 1tbsp dark soy sauce
  • 1tsp sesame oil
  • ½tsp crushed dried chilli flakes
  • 1tsp sesame seeds

Preheat the oven to 200°C/fan 180°C/gas 6. Drizzle a tray with the oil. Place the salmon fillets in the tray, skin-side down, add the spring onions and tomatoes and season with pepper.

Bake for 8 minutes.Meanwhile, bring a saucepan of water to the boil. Add the broccoli and return to the boil. Cook for 4 minutes then drain. Add the broccoli to the tray in the oven and drizzle the soy sauce and sesame oil over the fish.

Sprinkle everything with the chilli and sesame seeds and bake for 3-4 minutes, or until the salmon is just cooked through, then serve.

DESSERT

ORANGE & ALMOND LOAF

This superb orange and almond loaf is ideal for impressing dinner guests and is best served warm

This superb orange and almond loaf is ideal for impressing dinner guests and is best served warm

An irresistible, tangy cake. Amazingly, it’s cooked using whole oranges with no need to peel them. Serve warm in thin slices.

Serves 10 l 326cals per serving

Cook’s tip

You could also simmer the oranges in a pan of water, without pricking, for 50- 60 minutes. Top up with more water when needed

  • 2 medium oranges (each around 150g/5½oz), well washed
  • 8 soft pitted dates
  • 4tbsp olive oil
  • 4 medium eggs
  • 300g (10½oz) ground almonds
  • 1½tsp baking powder
  • 15g (½oz) flaked almonds

Prick both of the oranges 20 times with the tip of a knife and place in a microwave-proof bowl. Cover with a plate and microwave on high for 10 minutes, or until very soft. Preheat the oven to 190°C/fan 170°C/ gas 5. 

Line the base and sides of a 900g loaf tin with non-stick baking paper. Leave the oranges until cool enough to handle, then cut in half and remove any seeds. 

Place the oranges and dates in a food processor, add the olive oil and eggs and blitz until thoroughly blended. Add the ground almonds, baking powder and 4tbsp water and blend again to a thick batter. 

Pour into the prepared tin, spreading to the sides. Sprinkle with the flaked almonds and bake for 40-45 minutes, or until risen, golden brown and firm to the touch. Cool in the tin for 30 minutes, then turn out and cut into thin slices to serve.

SEARED PEACHES WITH YOGHURT & PISTACHIOS

This indulgent seared peaches with yoghurt and pistachios dessert is best served with nuts

This indulgent seared peaches with yoghurt and pistachios dessert is best served with nuts

Cook’s tip 

If you don’t have a griddle pan, you can grill the halved peaches instead, or cook them in a lightly oiled frying pan

A simple dessert that also works beautifully as a summer breakfast.

Serves 4 l 130cals per serving

  • 1tsp olive or rapeseed oil
  • 4 firm but ripe peaches or nectarines, halved and stoned
  • 150g (5½oz) full-fat live Greek yoghurt
  • 25g (1oz) unsalted pistachio nuts, roughly chopped

Place a griddle pan over a mediumhigh heat and brush with the oil. Place the peaches on the griddle, cut-side down, and cook, without moving, for about 3 minutes, or until hot and marked with griddle lines. Serve with the yoghurt and nuts.

CHOCOLATE KIDNEY BEAN CAKE 

This impressive chocolate kidney bean cake is filled with ingredients that are brilliant for gut bacteria

This impressive chocolate kidney bean cake is filled with ingredients that are brilliant for gut bacteria 

You’d never guess that the main ingredient for this is kidney beans! Cocoa is also a good source of flavonoids and polyphenols, which are brilliant for your gut bacteria.

Serves 12 l 250cals per serving

Cook’s tip 

You can use this mixture to make cupcakes. Use a 12-hole tray, lined with paper cases. They need 15-20 minutes of cooking time

  • 400g tin red kidney beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1tbsp vanilla extract
  • 5 eggs
  • 150g (5½oz) coconut oil, plus extra for greasing
  • 15 soft pitted dates, diced
  • 60g (2¼oz) cocoa powder
  • ½tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1tsp baking powder
  • ½tsp ground cinnamon
  • A pinch of salt
  • 150g (5½oz) fresh raspberries or cherries, stones removed

Preheat the oven to 170°C/fan 150°C/gas 3. Grease a 20cm round cake tin and line the base with lightly greased greaseproof paper. 

In a medium bowl blend the beans, vanilla, 2 of the eggs, 1tbsp water and the coconut oil until smooth (about 4-5 minutes). 

Add the rest of the ingredients except the raspberries or cherries and mix well. Pour into the tin, gently press the fruit into the surface and bake for about 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and leave to cool for 10 minutes before turning it out on a rack.

DORSET APPLE CAKE

This glorious Dorset apple cake can be topped with fruits and flaked almonds for a decorative appearance

This glorious Dorset apple cake can be topped with fruits and flaked almonds for a decorative appearance 

A delicious, tangy cake, adapted from the classic Dorset apple cake recipe to give it a gut-friendly twist.

Serves 12 l 265cals per serving

Covid-19: What You Need To Know About The Coronavirus And The Race For The Vaccine by Dr Michael Mosley is published by Short Books, £6.99 (ebook, £4.99). Recipes extracted from The Fast 800 Recipe Book, The Clever Guts Recipe Book and The 8-Week Blood Sugar Diet Recipe Book by Dr Clare Bailey and Fast Asleep by Dr Michael Mosley, published by Short Books. Visit amazon.co.uk, waterstones.com and hive.co.uk.

Covid-19: What You Need To Know About The Coronavirus And The Race For The Vaccine by Dr Michael Mosley is published by Short Books, £6.99 (ebook, £4.99). Recipes extracted from The Fast 800 Recipe Book, The Clever Guts Recipe Book and The 8-Week Blood Sugar Diet Recipe Book by Dr Clare Bailey and Fast Asleep by Dr Michael Mosley, published by Short Books. Visit amazon.co.uk, waterstones.com and hive.co.uk.

  • 2 small-medium eating apples
  • 1tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1tsp ground cinnamon
  • 3 large eggs
  • 150g (5½oz) butter, softened, plus extra for greasing
  • 200g (7oz) ground almonds
  • 50g (1¾oz) self-raising brown flour
  • 100g (3½oz) large, soft, pitted dates, chopped
  • 1tsp vanilla extract
  • 1tsp baking powder
  • 20g (¾oz) flaked almonds

Preheat the oven to 190°C/fan 170°C/gas 5. Grease and line a 23cm round loose-based cake tin with baking parchment. Core the apples and cut each one into about 12 wedges (keeping the skin on). 

Place in a medium bowl and toss with the lemon juice and cinnamon. Place the eggs, butter, ground almonds, flour, half the dates and all the vanilla extract and baking powder in a food processor and blitz until smooth. 

Stir in the rest of the dates. Spoon the batter into the tin and spread to the sides. Top with the apples, tucking the wedges close to each other in concentric circles, and bake for 25 minutes. 

Remove from the oven, sprinkle with the flaked almonds and cook for 12-15 minutes more, or until the cake is cooked through, the apples are tender and the nuts are golden. 

Cool in the tin for 30 minutes before removing. Cut into 12 slices and serve.

Dr Shiva Explains How Indian Medicine Uses Food to Boost Immune Health

Dr Shiva Explains How Indian Medicine Uses Food to Boost Immune Health

  • May 28, 2020

In ancient traditions of medicine, food played a major role in strengthening the immune system and preventing illness from occurring in the first place before invasive surgeries or drugs were even required.

Today, as people across the globe grapple with the fear of a pandemic, curious minds seek to sift out fact from fiction and determine the truth about how to arm their bodies and immune systems to fight the disease.

Dr Shiva Ayyadurai from MIT is a pioneer in the field of systems biology; he’s also spent two years in India studying traditional medicine from a systems engineering standpoint, gaining fresh insight into a system of medicine that is thousands of years old.

Epoch Times Photo
Illustration depicting Indian herbs and spices (Nila Newsom/Shutterstock)

What Dr Shiva realized was groundbreaking: that the ancient Indian healers were actually looking at the body as a systems engineer would. Rather than focusing primarily on invasive surgeries and treatments at a late stage of an illness, traditional Indian medicine emphasizes prevention: maintaining a healthy body constitution. One of the main ways of doing that was through nutrition.

Vitamins from Food

Most medical doctors are not educated on how the body’s immune system works, Dr Shiva says, or how to strengthen it. Vitamins are one way. What occurs during a viral infection is that viruses penetrate the outer surface of a cell in the body, hijack that cell, and then use the machinery of that cell to produce more viruses. Vitamins, however, can prevent this.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A helps put a “jacket” of protective cytokeratin around the cells in the body so that viruses cannot penetrate, Dr Shiva explains. While you can get vitamin A from supplements, he suggests to get it from food whenever possible.

Epoch Times Photo
Kale (Imsosomg/Shutterstock)

He suggests dark leafy green vegetables, such as kale, spinach, or amaranth, or dark purple fruits and vegetables as excellent sources of vitamin A. Other vitamin A foods include carrots, squashes, mangoes, and papayas, according to Community Eye Health Journal.

Vitamin C

To this day, modern medical establishment is studying the disease known as scurvy, which once plagued sailors, causing their teeth to fall out. Scurvy, it turns out, came from a lack of vitamin C, according to Dr Shiva. “Some of the ships’ captains realized this, and they gave people lime. That’s why sailors were called limeys,” he told The Epoch Times in an interview.

Epoch Times Photo
Hot chili peppers (AllaBond/Shutterstock)

Vitamin C stops viral replication and inflammatory response. It is also a powerful anti-oxidant and helps modulate the immune system.

Among the foods richest in vitamin C are guavas, kiwifruit, bell peppers, strawberries, and oranges, My Food Data reports. Other vitamin C foods include chili peppers, thyme, kale, lemon, and broccoli, according to Healtline.

Vitamin D

Although not a food, vitamin D, that is, being out in the sun, is one of the main supporters of immune health and long life, Dr Shiva says, adding that it is also an anti-microbial and a hormone and is also “phenomenal for your body.”

Gut Bacteria and the Microbiome

Not all bacteria are bad. In fact, the microbiome in the gut is an important part of the body’s immune system health, as it is part of what extracts the nutrients from the food we eat.

Epoch Times Photo
Sauerkraut (Ildi Papp/Shutterstock)

Another major supporter of long life in many traditional cultures was that they all drank some type of local fermented drink, such as wine or rice wine. “In Indian culture, we used to let old rice water [ferment]; we drank it the next day. It supports the gut bacteria, the microbiome,” Dr Shiva shared.

Eating fermented food such as yogurt, sauerkraut, and kimchi is also beneficial for digestion health, according to Science Focus, as are high-fiber foods such as onions, garlic, and beans.

Herbs and Spice

In traditional culture, for thousands of years, medicinal herbs were fully integrated into the diets in India and in other cultures. Mothers would pass down a set of spices to their daughters when they got married and went to live with their husbands, Dr Shiva explains.

Epoch Times Photo
Cloves (Bashutskyy/Shutterstock)

Those spices included cloves, cardamom, turmeric, anis, and asafetida. Turmeric, it turns out, helped prevent liver cancer. “Indians got one third liver cancer than Chinese,” Dr Shiva said. “And the epidemiological results showed it was because of the high consumption of turmeric … and there’s about 6,000 papers written on it.” Additionally, cloves are an “amazing antimicrobial,” he added.

Chai tea is also a delicious way of consuming many of these herbs, as well as cinnamon and ginger.

Eliminate Sugar and Toxic Residues

It is just as important to cut out unhealthy foods as it is to consume those that are beneficial.

Reducing sugar is something we can all do to promote immune health, as there is a sugar overabundance in places like the United States, which harms the immune system. “We give people loads of sugar, and that sugar creates candida,” Dr Shiva explains, “and that fungus essentially creates gliotoxins, which shut down one of your cylinders of the immune system, your macrophages and your T-cells.”

Epoch Times Photo
Wheat-based cereal (ArtBitz/Shutterstock)

Additionally, non-organic foods such as wheat, beans, honey, tea, and other produce are often sprayed with glyphosate (a chemical found in Roundup) as a drying agent, which does not wash off. This can lead to bad gut bacteria and fungal infection, which in turn can cause inflammation in the brain, behavioral problems, and severe symptoms of autism, according to Zen Honeycutt from Moms Across America Publishing.

Deep Social Connections

Although not food related, friendship and social connections are the number one reason why people lived long lives in many traditional cultures. Having deep social connections, deep fellowship, and deep community were essential to immune health. Conversely, social isolation, Dr Shiva says, “results in detriment that’s worse than high blood pressure, worse than smoking worse than obesity.”

“Those social connections boost antiviral activity; when you have friendship, when you feel safe, you lower inflammatory response. And this has been shown over and over again and multiple Western science landmark studies,” he adds.

Epoch Times Photo
Portrait depicting Indian villagers in Salunkwadi, India (Tukaram.Karve/Shutterstock)

Pandemic prods Vietnamese consumers toward healthy food and drinks

Pandemic prods Vietnamese consumers toward healthy food and drinks

  • May 28, 2020

The consumers are also more aware of specific health benefits of particular products, according to a new report by market research firm Nielsen Vietnam.

Shopping at a supermarket on May 1, Hong Hoa, a resident of HCMC’s District 5, put four packs of herbal tea into her shopping cart before looking for the usual essential items of milk, fruits and vegetables.

This has become a new habit for the mother of two for several months now. Worried about boosting immune system amid the coronavirus pandemic, Hoa has begun to give priority to healthy foods and drinks.

“I used to drink herbal teas, but not often, just for refreshment. I believe in traditional medicine and also find this tea good for health, eating and sleeping”, she said.

A

A customer shops at a supermarket in Ho Chi Minh City.

The consumption of healthy food has been a rising trend for several years now, as seen in the “clean-eating” drive in western European countries and America; as also macrobiotic diets in Asian countries. But the Covid-19 pandemic has provided added impetus. For many, it has been a wake-up call to adopt a healthy lifestyle and consume healthy products.

“People often wish for many things in life, like jobs, money and love, but when they fall ill, they only look for health. I want to equip myself and my family with strong resistance to avoid risks”, Hong Hoa said.

Researching post Covid-19 consumer behavior, a survey conducted by Nielsen Vietnam shows a sharp increase in demand for products that boost health and immune system. Even after society returned to a more or less normal life, people still have shown increased attention to health issues, thereby generating a major change in the consumption of food, beverage and fast moving consumer goods.

Among items that have seen robust consumption recently, consumers are prioritizing health food along with essential items. There is stronger focus on measures to boost immune system and maintain health, including fresh foods, healthy foods and drinks with immune boosting ingredients.

Respondents in the Nielsen Vietnam survey also listed the top five benefits of food and drinks that they considered the most important. This included products containing auxiliary nutrients like vitamin C, D, Omega 3 or probiotics, keeping the immune system healthy. They focus on products made with natural and quality ingredients, not to mention safe production.

For essential commodities such as milk, Vietnamese consumers have switched from pasteurized or sterilized milk to plant-based milk such as dark sesame milk, beans, walnuts and rice milk. Top dairy enterprises report increased import of raw materials to meet this new market demand.

From the perspective of beverage manufacturers, Tran Uyen Phuong, Deputy General Director of Tan Hiep Phat Group – a market leader in bottled tea in Vietnam, confirmed this trend. She said that despite the general decline in sales due to measures taken to contain the epidemic, the two good-for-health products of Tan Hiep Phat, Zero Degree Green Tea and Dr. Thanh Tea, continued to do well.

Tran

Tran Uyen Phuong, Deputy General Director and board member of Tan Hiep Phat Group.

Phuong explained that the increase in purchasing bottled tea may come from customers’ attention to traditional herbal medicine that boost the immune system and help prevent diseases. For instance, Dr. Thanh tea, a herbal drink that contains extracts of chrysanthemum, arhat fruit, rhinacanthus communis nees, licorice, bombax ceiba, lamiaceae, red frangipani flower, microcos panicutula L, honeysuckle and other herbs, has garnered greater attention from customers, she said. Dr Thanh herbal tea is also widely known in Vietnam for its ability to relieve inner heat, a concept linked to traditional medicine used to describe the body’s state in which too much “heat” and “dampness” accumulate internally due to a number of factors like hot, humid environment, consuming too much spicy and oily food, or staying up late.

In addition, EGCG in the composition of Zero Degree Green Tea also gained popularity as it contributes to reducing stress, soothing the nerves and slowing the aging process, Phuong added.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that global consumers need to maintain their consumption of low-fat, low-sugar and low-salt foods and beverages, while increasing high-vitamin and food groups, minerals, compounds that help increase resistance to diseases.

Aresearch team to study food and communication at Belgium’s Antwerp University has also released results of a survey of 11,000 consumers in 11 countries including Australia, Belgium, Chile, the Netherlands, France, Austria, Greece and Canada. This shows that during social distancing periods, consumers form healthier eating habits, cooking by themselves and eating more fruits and vegetables. Healthy foods were being preferred to junk food, a change from the normal situation, the survey found.

The research team also predicts that even after the Covid-19 crisis is over, consumers will maintain the habit of consuming healthy food, along with a more eco-friendly lifestyle, increasing consumption of natural products.

Is NJ Really Searching for Salmon Recipes this Quarantine?

Is NJ Really Searching for Salmon Recipes this Quarantine?

  • May 26, 2020

Lots of people, myself included, have done more cooking, and tried new recipes while staying at home. 

Earlier in quarantine, the Chicago Tribune posted the most Google-searched recipes by state, and I am somewhat surprised that New Jersey had been searching for salmon dishes to cook. The state as a whole is definitely being healthier than I am. The recipes in my Google search history include nachos, penne vodka, pasta al Limone, cheese enchiladas. Check out their article to find out what other states are cooking as well.

Have you tried any salmon recipes while staying at home? Or are you cooking guilty pleasures like I am?

15 Indigenous Crops to Boost Your Immune System and Celebrate Biodiversity

15 Indigenous Crops to Boost Your Immune System and Celebrate Biodiversity

  • May 21, 2020

By Jared Kaufman

This Friday, May 22, marks the International Day for Biological Diversity. Every year, the United Nations uses this day as an opportunity both to celebrate the Earth’s stunning biodiversity and to recognize our task to protect it.


Unfortunately, due to biodiversity loss from industrialization and unsustainable land use, the planet’s health is threatened. Nearly a quarter of wild food species—plant and animal—are decreasing in abundance, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. Biodiversity is not only important for the planet—but it’s important for human health, too. Eating a range of fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole grains can help immune systems by providing the full range of nutrients, from vitamins C and D to zinc and iron. And COVID-19 is revealing the urgency of improving immunity—and the power of food to protect us.

“There’s a range of vitamins, of flavanols, of minerals that have been looked at, that we know improve the immune system function. … Several specific nutrients seem to have activity against COVID-19-specific proteins,” Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, a cardiologist and the dean of the Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, told me on Food Talk Live this week. “What’s really interesting, beyond the general immune-boosting effects and the COVID-specific protein effects, many of these same nutrients or other nutrients blunt or soften this excessive inflammatory response that’s really what’s causing deaths in COVID.”

These 15 indigenous crops, among countless others, are prized in traditional agriculture systems for their resiliency, diversity, versatility, and most of all, nutritious value.

1. Amaranth (Amaranthus)

The more than 75 species of amaranth grow across nearly every continent, from the humid lowlands of Africa to mountainous countries in South America. Amaranth, which grows quickly in hot weather, is cultivated both as a leafy green and a cereal-like grain. It’s an excellent source of protein, vitamins, and essential minerals, including calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc.

2. Arracacha (Arracacia xanthorrhiza)

An important South American root crop, Arracacha is best described as somewhere between a carrot and celery root. It was originally cultivated in the Andes, but because of its versatility and low-input costs, is now an important crop in many lower regions of Brazil, Colombia, and Venezuela. Arracacha is typically prepared similarly to potatoes, but contains four times the calcium as potatoes and significant carotenoid pigments, the precursor to vitamin A.

3. Bay of Fundy Dulse (Palmaria palmata)

Dulse is a red seaweed that’s been used for culinary and medicinal purposes across Ireland, Iceland, and Canada’s Atlantic coast. Dulse that grows in the Bay of Fundy, between the provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, was once a popular snack food and an important ingredient in traditional chowders and stews for many First Nations communities. Dulse has a high protein content, and contains iodine, iron, and many other trace vitamins and minerals.

4. Chaya (Cnidoscolus aconitifolius)

Chaya, an evergreen plant native to the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico, has been a staple of indigenous diets for centuries in Mexico and Central America. Chaya grows very easily and is resistant to insects, heavy rains, and droughts. The leaves must be cooked to be safe to eat, but chaya is rich in protein, vitamins A and C, calcium, iron, phosphorus, and many minerals and enzymes.

5. Chayote (Sechium edule)

The chayote, a green, pear-shaped member of the squash family, has been an important part of diets across mesoamerica since pre-Columbian times. The plant is extremely versatile and can be grown in warm climates from sea level to more than 2000 meters above sea level. Most parts of the plant may be eaten, including the fruit, stems, and leaves, and it’s a good source of vitamin C and folate.

6. Desert Lime (Citrus glauca)

Desert lime grows naturally in the semi-arid regions in eastern Australia in a range of soil types. It is tolerant of heat, frost, drought, and salinity, and it can withstand extreme temperature conditions from -12 degrees C to 45 degrees C (10.4 degrees F to 113 degrees F). Desert lime has high levels of vitamin C, folate, calcium, and antioxidants.

7. Fonio (Digitaria)

The two species of fonio — white and black — grown across West Africa are versatile and gluten-free varieties of millet. Fonio is fast-growing and suitable for dry conditions, although very labor-intensive to harvest. The grain has been cited as a path toward greater food security in Africa and is high in iron, calcium, and several essential amino acids.

8. Kakadu Plum (Terminalia ferdinandiana)

The Kakadu Plum—also called the Gubinge, Billygoat Plum, or Murunga—grows across northern Australia and has the highest recorded natural vitamin C content of any plant in the world. Suited to its natural hot and coastal environment, the kakadu plum can grow in a variety of dry and saline habitats, from dry creek beds to cliff tops and ridges.

9. Kumara/Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas)

Sweet potatoes, also known as kumara in many Polynesian languages and in New Zealand’s indigenous Māori language, are a staple crop across Africa, Asia, and many cultures within and surrounding the Pacific Ocean. The starchy vegetable is a great source of protein, vitamins A and C, iron, calcium, and dietary fiber.

10. Målselvnepe Turnip (Brassica rapa subsp. rapa)

This old Norwegian landrace of turnip has been improved over the years through selective cultivation. It has an excellent, yet strong and distinct, taste compared to other turnip varieties. It can be eaten raw, roasted, baked, and boiled, and is frequently used to enhance the flavor of soups, salads, stir-fries, and side dishes. The Målselvnepe turnip is an excellent source of vitamin C and potassium.

11. Mung Bean (Vigna radiata)

The mung bean is important in Asian diets and valuable for its easily digestible protein. High levels of iron in the vegetable help improve the diets of the most vulnerable women and children, and mung bean production offers an opportunity for increased income for small-scale farmers. The vegetable can also fix nitrogen in the soil, making it valuable for crop rotations.

12. Northern Wild Rice (Zizania palustris)

Northern wild rice (manoomin in Anishinaabe languages), one of four global wild rice species, grows across the Great Lakes region in the U.S. and in aquatic areas of Canada’s Boreal Forest. Wild rice has been central to Indigenous foodways in the region, particularly in Minnesota, for millennia. Although it is now domesticated and cultivated largely for commercial sale, much of it is still harvested using traditional methods. Wild rice is rich in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and fiber, and contains more protein than most other whole grains.

13. Pawpaw (Asimina triloba)

The pawpaw fruit is the largest edible fruit indigenous to North America, and has a tropical flavor reminiscent of a mix between mangoes and bananas. It was grown and eaten by Native Americans and early European settlers, although it has proven difficult to commercialize due to its very short shelf life after harvesting. However, the fruit is high in vitamin C, magnesium, and iron, and also contains some vitamin A.

14. Purslane (Portulaca oleracea)

Since prehistoric times, purslane has been grown by humans around the world, from Australia to the Middle East to Asia. It’s still common in Mediterranean countries and in aboriginal Australian foodways. Purslane is capable of CAM photosynthesis in extreme conditions, which allows the plant to grow while saving water, making it a very successful plant across many climates. Purslane also contains more essential omega-3 fatty acids than any other leafy green, and the plant is also extraordinarily high in vitamin E.

15. Tepary Beans (Phaseolus acutifolius)

Tepary beans have been a staple crop for thousands of years and remain important for Indigenous farmers across North America, including in Tohono O’odham communities in the American southwest. They grow quickly in arid desert conditions and are resistant to alkaline soils, making them one of the most drought- and heat-tolerant crops in the world. Although related to standard beans, tepary beans actually contain more protein, calcium, fiber, iron, and zinc, and have a low glycemic index.

Reposted with permission from Food Tank.

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15 Indigenous Crops to Boost Your Immune System and Celebrate Biodiversity – Food Tank

15 Indigenous Crops to Boost Your Immune System and Celebrate Biodiversity – Food Tank

  • May 21, 2020

Contributing Author: Jared Kaufman

This Friday, May 22, marks the International Day for Biological Diversity. Every year, the United Nations uses this day as an opportunity both to celebrate the Earth’s stunning biodiversity and to recognize our task to protect it. 

Unfortunately, due to biodiversity loss from industrialization and unsustainable land use, the planet’s health is threatened. Nearly a quarter of wild food species—plant and animal—are decreasing in abundance, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. Biodiversity is not only important for the planet—but it’s important for human health, too. Eating a range of fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole grains can help immune systems by providing the full range of nutrients, from vitamins C and D to zinc and iron. And COVID-19 is revealing the urgency of improving immunity—and the power of food to protect us. 

“There’s a range of vitamins, of flavanols, of minerals that have been looked at, that we know improve the immune system function. … Several specific nutrients seem to have activity against COVID-19-specific proteins,” Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, a cardiologist and the dean of the Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, told me on Food Talk Live this week. “What’s really interesting, beyond the general immune-boosting effects and the COVID-specific protein effects, many of these same nutrients or other nutrients blunt or soften this excessive inflammatory response that’s really what’s causing deaths in COVID.”

These 15 indigenous crops, among countless others, are prized in traditional agriculture systems for their resiliency, diversity, versatility, and most of all, nutritious value.

1. Amaranth (Amaranthus)

The more than 75 species of amaranth grow across nearly every continent, from the humid lowlands of Africa to mountainous countries in South America. Amaranth, which grows quickly in hot weather, is cultivated both as a leafy green and a cereal-like grain. It’s an excellent source of protein, vitamins, and essential minerals, including calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc.

2. Arracacha (Arracacia xanthorrhiza)

An important South American root crop, Arracacha is best described as somewhere between a carrot and celery root. It was originally cultivated in the Andes, but because of its versatility and low-input costs, is now an important crop in many lower regions of Brazil, Colombia, and Venezuela. Arracacha is typically prepared similarly to potatoes, but contains four times the calcium as potatoes and significant carotenoid pigments, the precursor to vitamin A.

3. Bay of Fundy Dulse (Palmaria palmata)

Dulse is a red seaweed that’s been used for culinary and medicinal purposes across Ireland, Iceland, and Canada’s Atlantic coast. Dulse that grows in the Bay of Fundy, between the provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, was once a popular snack food and an important ingredient in traditional chowders and stews for many First Nations communities. Dulse has a high protein content, and contains iodine, iron, and many other trace vitamins and minerals.

4. Chaya (Cnidoscolus aconitifolius)

Chaya, an evergreen plant native to the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico, has been a staple of indigenous diets for centuries in Mexico and Central America. Chaya grows very easily and is resistant to insects, heavy rains, and droughts. The leaves must be cooked to be safe to eat, but chaya is rich in protein, vitamins A and C, calcium, iron, phosphorus, and many minerals and enzymes.

5. Chayote (Sechium edule)

The chayote, a green, pear-shaped member of the squash family, has been an important part of diets across mesoamerica since pre-Columbian times. The plant is extremely versatile and can be grown in warm climates from sea level to more than 2000 meters above sea level. Most parts of the plant may be eaten, including the fruit, stems, and leaves, and it’s a good source of vitamin C and folate.

6. Desert Lime (Citrus glauca) 

Desert lime grows naturally in the semi-arid regions in eastern Australia in a range of soil types. It is tolerant of heat, frost, drought, and salinity, and it can withstand extreme temperature conditions from -12 degrees C to 45 degrees C (10.4 degrees F to 113 degrees F). Desert lime has high levels of vitamin C, folate, calcium, and antioxidants.

7. Fonio (Digitaria)

The two species of fonio — white and black — grown across West Africa are versatile and gluten-free varieties of millet. Fonio is fast-growing and suitable for dry conditions, although very labor-intensive to harvest. The grain has been cited as a path toward greater food security in Africa and is high in iron, calcium, and several essential amino acids.

8. Kakadu Plum (Terminalia ferdinandiana)

The Kakadu Plum—also called the Gubinge, Billygoat Plum, or Murunga—grows across northern Australia and has the highest recorded natural vitamin C content of any plant in the world. Suited to its natural hot and coastal environment, the kakadu plum can grow in a variety of dry and saline habitats, from dry creek beds to cliff tops and ridges.

9. Kumara/Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas)

Sweet potatoes, also known as kumara in many Polynesian languages and in New Zealand’s indigenous Māori language, are a staple crop across Africa, Asia, and many cultures within and surrounding the Pacific Ocean. The starchy vegetable is a great source of protein, vitamins A and C, iron, calcium, and dietary fiber.

10. Målselvnepe Turnip (Brassica rapa subsp. rapa)

This old Norwegian landrace of turnip has been improved over the years through selective cultivation. It has an excellent, yet strong and distinct, taste compared to other turnip varieties. It can be eaten raw, roasted, baked, and boiled, and is frequently used to enhance the flavor of soups, salads, stir-fries, and side dishes. The Målselvnepe turnip is an excellent source of vitamin C and potassium.

11. Mung Bean (Vigna radiata)

The mung bean is important in Asian diets and valuable for its easily digestible protein. High levels of iron in the vegetable help improve the diets of the most vulnerable women and children, and mung bean production offers an opportunity for increased income for small-scale farmers. The vegetable can also fix nitrogen in the soil, making it valuable for crop rotations.

12. Northern Wild Rice (Zizania palustris)

Northern wild rice (manoomin in Anishinaabe languages), one of four global wild rice species, grows across the Great Lakes region in the U.S. and in aquatic areas of Canada’s Boreal Forest. Wild rice has been central to Indigenous foodways in the region, particularly in Minnesota, for millennia. Although it is now domesticated and cultivated largely for commercial sale, much of it is still harvested using traditional methods. Wild rice is rich in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and fiber, and contains more protein than most other whole grains.

13. Pawpaw (Asimina triloba)

The pawpaw fruit is the largest edible fruit indigenous to North America, and has a tropical flavor reminiscent of a mix between mangoes and bananas. It was grown and eaten by Native Americans and early European settlers, although it has proven difficult to commercialize due to its very short shelf life after harvesting. However, the fruit is high in vitamin C, magnesium, and iron, and also contains some vitamin A.

14. Purslane (Portulaca oleracea)

Since prehistoric times, purslane has been grown by humans around the world, from Australia to the Middle East to Asia. It’s still common in Mediterranean countries and in aboriginal Australian foodways. Purslane is capable of CAM photosynthesis in extreme conditions, which allows the plant to grow while saving water, making it a very successful plant across many climates. Purslane also contains more essential omega-3 fatty acids than any other leafy green, and the plant is also extraordinarily high in vitamin E.

15. Tepary Beans (Phaseolus acutifolius)

Tepary beans have been a staple crop for thousands of years and remain important for Indigenous farmers across North America, including in Tohono O’odham communities in the American southwest. They grow quickly in arid desert conditions and are resistant to alkaline soils, making them one of the most drought- and heat-tolerant crops in the world. Although related to standard beans, tepary beans actually contain more protein, calcium, fiber, iron, and zinc, and have a low glycemic index.

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This immunity boosting soup recipe can help your body fight off illnesses, thrive amid coronavirus pandemic

This immunity boosting soup recipe can help your body fight off illnesses, thrive amid coronavirus pandemic

  • May 18, 2020
MALIBU, Calif. (KABC) — To date there is no known food that can cure a cold, flu or COVID-19, but there is ample research on nutrients that support the body!

Vitamins C and A top the list, and if you check the nutrient value in most fruits and vegetables, you’ll find most produce is packed with them.

Feel free to add veggies to this soup that you think are headed past their prime. Most will work well.

Along with getting enough sunshine, vitamin D is found in certain mushrooms, which is another component to keeping the immune system strong.

Then there are allium compounds found in the onion and garlic family which are well known antioxidants that fight off illness.

Known for her restaurant Akasha and ARCucina, Akasha Richmond created her “healing greens puree” well over 15 years ago as a way to get her teenage daughter to get her greens.

See the story above and check out the recipe below. It has adaptations for one more vital immunity booster: zinc. You’ll find chick peas, legumes, eggs, meat, lamb and whole grains are all good sources.

Akasha Richmond’s ‘Healing Greens Puree’ adaptation:

Serving size: 6

INGREDIENTS:
1 medium leek (white part only) sliced
2 cups sliced zucchini
2 cups broccoli florets
2 cloves garlic minced
1 tsp fresh or dried thyme leaves
1 bay leaf
1 tsp Kosher salt
1 quart veggie or chicken stock
1 1/2 cups organic unsweetened soy or other thick creamy alternative milk
freshly ground pepper

Saute sliced veggies in olive oil in a stock pot. Combine first 9 ingredients in a stock pot and bring to boil over medium high heat.

Reduce to a simmer, cover and cook until veggies are soft, about 30 minutes.

Add milk of choice to vegetables and broth of choice, then remove the bay leaf.

In three separate batches puree the soup in blender or food processor. (Remember: heated liquids in a blender need a lid that is slightly ajar for steam to escape or wait until soup is cooled.)

Season to taste with pepper.

*Blended chick peas can be a a nice addition or top with sliced hard boiled egg. You can also serve with whole grain toast.

Copyright © 2020 KABC-TV. All Rights Reserved.

Food for thought: Go back to basics, cut addictions

Food for thought: Go back to basics, cut addictions : The Tribune India

  • May 18, 2020

Open House What steps can be taken to boost immunity in the wake of Covid-19 pandemic?

The number of Covid-19 cases is rising sharply. In order to ensure the virus doesn’t infect us, we have to eat healthy food and avoid junk food. We must include salad, fruits such as papaya in our diet and also drink milk. We should also make sure the vegetables are fresh. Nowadays people prefer eating junk food at home and do not perform any exercise to digest them. We have to give some time on our fitness to boost our immunity.

Sanjna

Switch to low-carb diet, avoid excess sugar

The food you eat plays a key aspect in determining your overall health and immunity. Eat low-carb diets, as this will help control high blood sugar and pressure. To stay hydrated we should drink up to 8-10 glasses of water daily. It will help us to flush out the toxins from the body and lower the chances of getting flu. We must exercise regularly. It will improve our metabolism and immune system. To keep stress away, we need to do meditation as it will have a calming effect on us and decrease anxiety.

Lavisha

Follow govt advisories, safety guidelines

We should take care of our health to boost our immunity. Balanced diet, proper sleep and exercise can increase your ability to fight the pandemic. Various governmental apps, advisories, programmes suggest different ways to help maintain good health. We must maintain hygiene, stay at home and follow proper safety guidelines to keep the

virus at bay.

Paneet Kaur

Take good sleep,

eat enough fruits

To boost our immunity to fight the deadly virus, it’s necessary to have a balanced diet. There are many natural ingredients as well as exercises which make human body physically and mentally strong. Our body needs adequate amount of nutrients that helps to perform our daily function which also ensures that our immune system is working properly. Another way that has been linked to more effective immune system is aerobic exercise. The survey also shows that the immune system goes hand in hand with being fit. For that we should start doing moderate exercise. We should include fruits and vegetables in our diet, get enough sleep, reduce stress to build up a good immune system.

Mehak Bajaj

Do pranayam, drink herbal tea to boost immunity

While being confined in your homes, you can increase your immunity by following the guidelines issued by the Ministry of AYUSH. Drink warm water in the morning. Prepare medicated ‘kadha’ by adding lemon, ginger, black pepper, cinnamon powder in boiling water and drink it after it cools down. These herbal spices are known for their ability to boost immunity. Daily practise Yogasana, Pranayama and meditation. Make it a habit for your whole doing yogic asans such as sukhasana, ardha matsyendrasana, matsyasana variation, uttanasana and viparita karani for strong immunity. Include more fruits and vegetables in your diet and reduce the craze for junk food. You can also take giloy, which is an ayurvedic herb. Wake up early in the morning and sleep early at night. One more important step is to stop panicking, because anxiety also reduces immunity. Learn to stay happy in every situation of life. You can also go for acupuncture as it helps boost immunity system.

Manmohan Kaur

Quit smoking, alcohol

To boost our immunity we should consume a balanced diet. We must eat home-cooked food and drink lots of water to keep ourselves hydrated. Quit smoking, alcohol and addictive substances as they harm our immunity. The minute we will stop taking these our body kick-starts its natural defense system. Another important thing is to have a sound sleep of 7-8 hours. Compromising with sleep can create hormonal imbalance which can hurt our immune system and mental health. One of the main things which have a negative effect on our immunity is stress. Stress decreases our efficiency and makes us vulnerable to diseases. To cut stress we can practise meditation. Don’t skip exercise

as it helps in getting rid of toxins and improves metabolism. We can limit our exposure to the virus by staying indoors, eating

healthy, and following basic hygiene protocol.

Ridhi Garg

Eat papaya, drink milk; avoid junk food

Following lockdown norms and government advisories is the need of the hour. Avoid eating junk food. Don’t venture out of your homes unnecessarily. Follow a healthy routine to strengthen your immune system. We must accept the new lifestyle. After taking fruits, vegetables etc wash them thoroughly and use them at home. We must include milk, papaya, amla, bitter gourd, orange in our diets.

Srishty

Avoid sugar, consume healthy fats

Apart from staying at home and following social distancing, maintaining immunity is also important to keep Covid-19 at bay. If our immunity system is strong then one can easily fight with the virus. Getting at least 7-8 hours of sleep can improve the immunity. We must avoid sugar from our diet and eat healthy fats. We must exercise daily and stay hydrated. To cut stress, we can watch positive videos online or play indoor games. Homeopathic medicines can boost our immunity. Eat always healthy food and eat vegetables and fruits to boost immunity so one may be able to keep away coronavirus.

Dr Mohd Saleem Farooqui

Increase intake of fruits, vegetables, nuts

To bolster our immunity we must take roughly 8-10 hours of sleep in a day and increase the intake of fruits, vegetables, nuts etc. in our diet. Obesity is the main cause of all diseases. We must exercise regularly to keep ourselves fit and cut the intake of sugar. One should not take stress also. In summers, staying hydrated is also necessary for our overall health. Some ayurvedic tips such as drinking warm water, gargling twice or thrice a day with hot saline water, increased use of garlic and ginger in our diet can also be followed to boost our immunity.

Bir Devinder Singh Bedi

Stay hygienic, choose unprocessed foods

Keeping oneself in a positive state of mind plays a vital role in the overall well-being of a person. Positive thoughts reduce stress and inflammation, and increase resilience to infection. Choosing whole, unprocessed foods does wonders for overall health of a person. Allicin, a compound found in garlic, is well-known for its ability to boost the immune system. In addition, robust gut bacteria also protect us from infection. One should keep these bacteria healthy with prebiotics that contain fiber, specifically insulin fiber. And, excellent sources of prebiotics are Jerusalem artichokes, green bananas or plantains, Jicama root and asparagus. Vitamin C is also well known to boost the immunity and it’s better to get vitamin C from oranges, broccoli, kiwi or cantaloupe. Experts say that older adults who ate kiwi every day for a month had a significant decrease in the severity and duration of upper respiratory infection symptoms. Colorful fruits and vegetables including berries, carrots and spinach have antioxidants that protect us against oxidative stress, which translates to a stronger immune system. Don’t smoke and take 7-8 hours of sleep, do meditation for at least five minutes a day and try to be physically active. If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation. Take steps to avoid infection, such as washing your hands frequently.

Ravi Chander Garg

Eat right, be active

Try to consume vegetables and fruits rich in beta-carotene, ascorbic acid and other essential vitamins. Certain foods such as mushrooms, tomato, bell pepper and green vegetables such as broccoli, spinach are also good options to build resilience in the body against infections. Take minimum 7-8 hours of sleep to help your body build immunity, lesser sleep will leave you tired and impair your brain activity. Drink up to 8-10 glasses of water every day, to stay hydrated. A good diet should be followed by an exercise routine. It is recommended to exercise for 30 to 45 minutes, depending on your stamina. Meditation is best way to relieve stress. Here are a few common supplements and superfoods that can help vitamin C, vitamin D, zinc, elderberry, turmeric and garlic.

Vishali kalra

Boost immunity

for healthy life

Strengthening immune system can help you lead a healthy life. Drink warm water throughout the day. Take steam in case of cold or sore throat. Vitamin C intake should be increased. Use turmeric, cumin and garlic regularly in cooking. Golden milk, herbal tea with Tulsi, cinnamon and lemonade are natural immunity boosters. Regular exercise keeps the body fit and help counter diseases. Follow a balanced diet. Avoid junk food. Eat fruits and vegetables to stay healthy but make sure to wash them properly before consuming. Get sunlight for about 15 minutes early in the morning. Don’t take stress and spend quality time with your family.

Rashim Malhotra

Follow diet low in carbs

The food we eat plays a key role in determining our overall health and immunity. Eat low carb diet, as this will help control high blood sugar and pressure. Regularly consume vegetables and fruits rich in Beta carotene, Ascorbic acid and other essential vitamins. Certain foods like mushrooms, tomato, bell pepper and green vegetables such as broccoli and spinach are also good options to build resilience in the body against infections.

Jasmine Kaur

Follow government guidelines seriously

The Covid-19 has caught all nations off guard and become a grave danger to everyone. All researchers and doctors are trying their best to find a vaccine to cure it. Thus, in this time of crisis, it is our responsibility too to follow the guidelines issued by the government as well as the local authorities regularly. All necessary information regarding the pandemic is regularly updated on the official website of the government. We must follow social distancing, avoid unnecessary outing, sanitising or washing our hands properly if we go outside. Now, the government has given some relaxation so that our work is not affected, but guidelines must be followed strictly. Though officials are working day and night to contain the spread of Covid, some irresponsible people are not taking the government guidelines seriously. The situation is grim. If one person gets infected, his whole family and people residing nearby his residence may also face consequences. So we have to be extra careful and try to fight this battle against Covid together.

Rajni

Practise mindful eating

The Covid-19 threat has forced us to stay at home, so our social activities and social interactions have been reduced. To boost up our immunity, we must eat healthy and take out some time for exercise. Also, our screen time must be reduced and spend more time with our loved ones.

Harshpreet Kaur

Don’t ignore your

mental health

We all know that physical exercise is important to lead a healthy life. But don’t ignore your mental health. Not only physical exercise, but brain exercise must be done to keep ourselves busy and to stay away from negative thoughts. Read good books, cook food, pour your thoughts on a paper. Don’t stress yourself in this period. Relax because a long-term break like this is not in everybody’s fate. To boost your immune system, follow a balanced diet that is rich in antioxidants, vitamins and essential fats. Sleep on time. Do not just train your body, train your mind too.

Smriti Chaudhary

Strong immune system can fight disease

There are many ways that can help you boost your immune system. Eat garlic, drink warm water and include more green vegetables in your diet. Do some exercise daily. Reduce sugar intake. Drink lots of water and do meditation or yoga. Sleep at least eight hours a day for a healthy life and strong immune system.

Khushleen Arneja

Stay hydrated to flush

out toxins from body

The food you eat plays a key role in determining your overall health and immunity. Eat low-carb diet as this will help control high blood sugar and pressure, and also slow down diabetes. Foods such as mushrooms, tomato, bell pepper and green vegetables are also good options to build resilience in the body against infections. You can have supplements rich in omega 3 and 6 fatty acids for daily. Some neutral immunity supplements include ginger, gooseberries (Amla) and turmeric and there are several herbs such as garlic and black cumin that boosts immunity. Drink at least 8 glasses of water everyday. Staying hydrated helps you flush out toxins from your body and lower the chances of flu. A good diet should be followed by an exercise routine. Regular exercise of 30 to 45 minutes improves metabolism which has a direct correlation with body immunity.

Neha Chaurasia

Drink warm water, add spices to your food

Drink warm water throughout the day. Squeeze a lemon in your water to get your vitamin C. Practise Yoga aasanas, Pranayam or meditation for at least 30 minutes as advised by the Ministry of Ayush. Spices such as turmeric, cardamom, coriander and garlic are recommended in cooking. Use garam masala. Take a spoon of chavanprash in the morning. Drink turmeric milk. Add jaggery and fresh lemon juice in your food. Have honey for cough and use cloves and lemon in tea.

Jazi Arora

Eat home-made food, minimise stress

A strong immune system can help fight Covid-19. Everybody should eat homemade food. Vitamin C is one of the biggest immunity boosters. Consume foods rich in vitamin C such as oranges, strawberries, broccoli etc. Exercise or meditate regularly also boost your immune system. Get enough sleep and minimise stress.

Shivani Kumari

Prevention is better

than cure

Since there is no vaccine as yet to treat Covid-19, its fear of taking much higher death toll looms large. So only way to cure this disease is prevention and boosting your immunity. There are many ways to boost your immune system. Physical activity can give your immune system a great boost in a myriad of ways. Even sweating is good for immune health. One of the keys to a healthy immune system is eating right. When things are right in the gut, all is well with the immune system. Sleep reboots your mind and your body, so it’s no surprise that it also reboots your immune system. So these are some ways that can help you boost your immunity and stay safe from Covid-19.

Deepantika Jain

Practise meditation, yoga & get adequate sleep

Boost your immune system to fight against this virus. Practise meditation, yoga and get adequate sleep. Drink enough water to stay hydrated. Moderate exercise can reduce inflammation and promote healthy turnover of immune cells. Jogging, walking and swimming are great options to boost your immunity. Several whole plant foods contain antioxidants, fiber, vitamin C, all of which may lower your susceptibility to illness.

Nidhi Kumari

Stay away from alcohol

As Covid-19 does not have any vaccine yet, it is vital that our immune system must be strong to fight the same. Intake of balanced diet is pivotal. Also as per medical experts, fruits rich in vitamin C are necessary. Stay away or reduce the intake of alcohol.

Maan Kaur Saini

Avoid travelling,

take proper rest

Excess of anything is harmful and so is staying indoors during the lockdown. It has resulted in depression and anxiety among people. But it is important to stay safe and accept what we have. Boosting your immunity is also crucial to fight this disease. Eating healthy food and stay hydrated. Take probiotics and practise meditation. Avoid travelling and take proper rest to keep your immunity strong.

Ishita Katyal

Stress, insomnia bad

for immune system

Every responsible individual must contribute his/her bit towards a healthier and Covid-free nation. While we are facing drastic changes all around, some little positive changes in our everyday routine can help us boost our immunity to fight the Covid-19. For a healthier immune system, one must adopt healthy eating. Include citrus fruits and green vegetables in your diet. However, supplementing with various vitamins and minerals, especially Zinc, can help in countless ways. Covid is known to affect lungs and TB majorly, so quit smoking. Drink 8-10 glasses of water to stay hydrated. Moreover, as we know stress and insomnia are two major factors for a bad immune system, so during the lockdown, we must make focus on these key components by adopting a proper 8-hour sleep schedule, meditation and yoga as a part of our everyday life.

Rhea Abrol

Use spices in cooking

Drink warm water throughout the day. Practise Yoga aasanas, Pranayama and meditation for at least 30 minutes daily. Use spices such as turmeric, cumin, coriander and garlic in cooking. Drink herbal tea. Apply sesame oil/coconut oil or ghee in both nostrils in morning and evening. Harnoor Bagga

Yoga for better immunity

Prevention is better than cure, and in case of Covid-19, this needs to be practised religiously. Take steps to boost your immunity. Drinking warm water throughout the day, practising yoga asanas and include spices in your diet. Blessnoor Kaur

Don’t miss citrus fruits

Strong immune system is necessary for fighting against coronavirus. Yoga is the best way of doing this. There are various TV channels which telecast yoga practises every day. Other way is to meditate regularly to keep the mind calm and strong. Consumption of vitamin C is necessary for fighting against coronavirus. ritu priya

Reduce alcohol intake, exercise regularly

Enhancing immunity can be done by paying attention to nutrition absorption. To strengthen our immune system, we should drink a glass of milk with turmeric. Include broccoli, sweet potatoes, spinach and ginger in our diet. Have blueberries as these have antioxidant properties. Include lots of fruits and vegetables in your diet. Doing physical activities such as sports is also essential to maintaining immunity. Exercise should be done for 30 minutes at least three times a week with moderate intensity. Exercising will help improve body protection and maintain physicality. Do not smoke. Drink in moderation, if you are fond of it. Excessive drinking is harmful for immunity. Sound sleep of at least eight hours in a day is a must for good health. Eat foods rich in vitamin C such as oranges, gooseberries and lemons.

Farzana Khan

Drink medicated kadha to beat Covid

A healthy lifestyle as a whole is your best option to boost immunity. We can augment our immunity by eating nutritious food, especially fresh fruits, foods containing high amount of vitamin C and D and homeopathic booster such as Arsenicum album 30. Amid lockdown, low-priced fruits such as banana, guava and watermelon are a healthy option. Drink herbal tea (kadha) made from tulsi (basil), cinnamon, black pepper, sonth (dry ginger) — once or twice a day. Add jaggery to your taste, if needed. It is claimed that this drink increases immunity. As soon as you get up in the morning, drink warm water with aloe vera pulp in it. Practise yoga every day and drink turmeric milk to keep Covid at bay.

Gautam Dev


OPEN HOUSE COMMENT

A fearful mind affects your body , weakens immunity

Minna Zutshi

Even as countries and communities across the world continue their fight against the Covid-19 pandemic, no definitive treatment has emerged yet. However, there is one step, finding consensus among experts from various systems of medicine, and that is the preventive measure of boosting the immunity.

Experts emphasise on the importance of building immunity by focusing on diet and immunity boosters. The AYUSH Ministry has prepared a kit for distribution among the police personnel. Adequate sleep, rest and relaxation are equally important for building immunity, if we go by what the experts say. Interestingly, for all the fear psychosis that the pandemic has spurred, the experts are unanimous in suggesting that fear weakens the immunity. It diminishes the body’s disease-fighting capacity and makes one more prone to infection. In sum, immunity is not just related to body, it is also related to mind – a fearful and apprehensive mind affects the body negatively, and that in turn weakens the immunity.

OPEN HOUSE QUESTION
What steps need to be taken to remain safe and healthy during lockdown 4.0?

ludhiana.feedback@gmail.com

Immune-boosting foods that fight the flu | Features

Immune-boosting foods that fight the flu | Features

  • May 14, 2020

We are all interested in keeping our immune systems healthy right now. Certainly getting enough sleep and some exercise will help, but health experts say what you eat has lot to do with it too.

The experts say you want to concentrate on foods that are high in vitamins, minerals and nutrients to keep your immune system strong. Look for foods with vitamin B6 like bananas and foods with probiotics like yogurt.

Oranges and grapefruits get all the Vitamin C glory when it comes to boosting your immune system. But did you know one cup of strawberries or raw broccoli gives you nearly 100 percent of your daily Vitamin C? And, a medium size red bell pepper contains nearly double the daily value.

Gena Lewis is a doctor at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in Oakland.

“I’m a medical doctor, and I prescribe medicine,” Lewis said. “But I always like to take the natural approach whenever possible, and food is medicine.”

Garlic and olive oil have anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties which help fight off infection.

“There’s so much evidence that the more we eat that’s plant-based, that’s not processed, so fresh from garden to kitchen is the direction to lean in,” said Richard Seidman, chief medical officer at L.A. Care Health Plan.

You can also drink bone broth which contains a more concentrated dose of vitamins, minerals and amino acids. To give it some flavor, simmer it with ingredients like ginger or cayenne for an extra immune boost.

With ways to keep your immune system healthy and kick sickness to the curb, knowing foods to stay clear of is just as important. Avoid alcohol, caffeinated beverages, crunchy crackers and chips, which aggravate a sore throat, and processed foods which all weaken the immune system.

capsimmunesystem.org