Latest news from around the world

Latest news from around the world

  • August 7, 2020

Pakistan’s government has announced plans to reopen tourist hot spots, restaurants, salons and movie theaters next week due to a continued drop in coronavirus infections in the country.

The country has identified 281,863 cases of Covid-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 6,035 patients have died. Authorities reported Friday that 727 cases and 21 fatalities had been identified in the previous 24 hours.

However, numbers are down overall. Data from the Ministry of Health shows that coronavirus cases and fatalities have both dropped 80% since their peaks in June.

Pakistan’s Planning Minister Asad Umar announced in a briefing that “the Covid-19 pandemic had greatly been controlled due to the effective strategy of government institutions.”

What’s opening when: Movie theaters, restaurants and businesses in the hospitality industry can open Monday. Tourism activities can restart tomorrow, Umar said.

All outdoor and indoor non-contact activities will also be allowed from Monday.

Umar said all the educational institutions in the country will be opened September 15 pending a final review by the Ministry of Education on September 7.

Marriage halls will be allowed to function from September 15, and train and airline restrictions will be lifted in October, Umar said.

Scammy PPE sellers exploit COVID-19 fears

Scammy PPE sellers exploit COVID-19 fears

  • August 6, 2020

Last month, the FTC filed its first case against an online seller that failed to ship next-day personal protective equipment (PPE) as promised. Today, we have an update: the FTC is filing three more cases as part of a continuing effort to address “online shopping” fraud that seeks to exploit high demand for PPE and other COVID-related products.

The FTC alleges that QYK Brands, LLC, Zaappaaz/wrist-band.com, and American Screening, LLC are taking advantage of consumers’ fear of COVID-19 by advertising the availability and quick delivery of hand sanitizer and PPE, while knowing they can’t meet those promises.

By law, sellers are supposed to ship your order within the time stated in their ads, or within 30 days if the ads don’t give a time. If a seller can’t ship within the promised time, it has to give you a revised shipping date, with the chance to either cancel your order for a full refund or accept the new shipping date.

According to the FTC’s complaints, the three companies fail to: deliver on time (if at all), notify customers of delayed shipments, offer order cancellations and refunds, and honor refund requests. In many cases, when the equipment finally arrives, it’s the wrong size or is defective. The companies also often substitute products without customers’ permission.

Dr. J’s Natural and its spokesperson Dr. J (a company related to QYK) also boldly promote a supplement, specifically targeting the Vietnamese speaking population in Southern California, claiming the product can prevent and treat COVID-19 by boosting the immune system. The company also claims the supplement is clinically tested and FDA-approved to treat COVID-19. In truth, says the FTC, the company has no proof to back up its claims.

Before you order from an unfamiliar online store, consider these tips to help avoid a scam:

  • Check out the company or product by typing its name in a search engine with terms like “review,” “complaint,” or “scam.” See what other people say about it.
  • Look at the terms of the sale. Calculate the total purchase price, including taxes, shipping, and handling. If you have to return the item, can you get a refund? Who pays for return shipping? Is there a restocking fee?
  • Pay by credit card. That gives you protections under federal law. If a business charged your account too soon, and didn’t deliver the merchandise on time, you can dispute the billing error and report it to your credit card company.

If you suspect a scam, let us know about it at ftc.gov/complaint. Your reports help the FTC and our law enforcement partners stop scammers.

To learn more about avoiding Coronavirus-related scams, visit ftc.gov/coronavirus, and sign up for our consumer alerts.

Vegan chef Elyce Jacobson shares her Top 5 Tips to boost the immune system - Honolulu, Hawaii news, sports & weather

Vegan chef Elyce Jacobson shares her Top 5 Tips to boost the immune system – Honolulu, Hawaii news, sports & weather

  • August 5, 2020

Island News: If It Matters To You, It Matters To Us 

Novavax Coronavirus Vaccine Candidate is Safe, Produces Immune Response | Health News

Novavax Coronavirus Vaccine Candidate is Safe, Produces Immune Response | Health News

  • August 5, 2020

A third U.S. company has released results from a study indicating that its potential coronavirus vaccine is safe and sparks an immune response.

Novavax Inc. released results from Phase 1 of its study showing that two doses of its COVID-19 vaccine candidate, NVX-CoV2373, elicited an immune response in 100% of the study’s participants. The volunteers developed neutralizing antibodies at levels four times higher on average than antibodies developed by people who had contracted the coronavirus and recovered, according to the results.

Cartoons on the Coronavirus

Neutralizing antibodies are antibodies that fight off the virus that causes COVID-19. The vaccine was given to participants with and without an adjuvant, a component to boost the immune system. The doses with the adjuvant induced a response from T-cells, a type of immune cell.

Three U.S. companies now have promising vaccine results: Moderna, Pfizer and Novavax. Novavax announced in July that it had been awarded $1.6 billion from the federal government program Operation Warp Speed to develop a coronavirus vaccine.

The potential vaccine was well tolerated in the study’s participants, which included 131 healthy adults aged 18 to 59. Reported side effects included tenderness and pain near the injection site. Headache, fatigue and muscle aches were also reported less-frequent side effects, the company said.

No Grade 3, severe or significant, adverse side effects were reported.

Data from Phase 1 has been submitted for peer review to a scientific journal but hasn’t been reviewed by independent experts or published yet.

Post-menopausal women may be at a higher risk of getting coronavirus, according to a recent study (stock)

Coronavirus: Post-menopausal women may be at higher risk

  • August 4, 2020

Post-menopausal women may be more likely to get severely ill with coronavirus, according to research. 

Researchers from King’s College London say their findings suggest high levels of oestrogen protect against Covid-19. 

They analysed data from almost 600,000 women in the UK who use the COVID Symptom Study app.

People who have the app report how they feel every day, including if they develop symptoms of the coronavirus or get a test result.

Results showed post-menopausal women were 22 per cent more likely to report symptoms of Covid-19 than women who still had periods.

They were also more likely to be hospitalised and need respiratory support — an indication of severe Covid-19.   

The findings suggest HRT — drugs which contain artificial oestrogen to help relieve symptoms of the menopause, such as hot flushes — may boost the immune system.

Data showed HRT appeared to lessen the severity of Covid-19 in post-menopausal women because they were less likely to need hospital care.

Younger women on the combined contraceptive pill, which contains oestrogen, also had lower rates of Covid-19 symptoms than women who did not. 

Post-menopausal women may be at a higher risk of getting coronavirus, according to a recent study (stock)

Post-menopausal women may be at a higher risk of getting coronavirus, according to a recent study (stock)

Oestrogen is a sex hormone that’s responsible for the development and regulation of the female reproductive system. 

Levels of oestrogen plummet in post-menopausal women and can influence how the body functions — including the immune system.

The researchers, led by Dr Ricardo Costeira, suggested oestrogen could protect against Covid-19.

This could explain why the disease and MERS — another related type of coronavirus — pose more of a threat to men more than women. 

The experts wrote: ‘It has been well-illustrated that females generally mount greater inflammatory, antiviral, and humoral immune responses than males.’

They added that this contributes to better clearance of viruses, including SARS-CoV-2 — which causes Covid-19.

The study looked at 44,000 post-menopausal women who stopped having periods within the last five years. They were 53.8 years old, on average. 

WHAT IS THE MENOPAUSE? 

Menopause is defined as the changes a woman goes through as she stops getting her periods and is no longer able to get pregnant naturally. Around 60 per cent experience symptoms resulting in behavioral changes and one in four will suffer severely. 

Common symptoms include hot flushes, night sweats, vaginal dryness leading to discomfort during sex, disrupted sleep, decreased sex drive, problems with memory and concentration and mood swings.

Menopause happens when your ovaries stop producing as much of the hormone oestrogen and no longer release an egg each month.

In the UK, the average age for a woman to reach the menopause is 51, according to the NHS.

The average age for a woman to reach menopause – when regular periods stop – is 51.

The data of the first group was compared against 108,000 pre-menopausal women who still regularly menstruated.

Results showed that post-menopausal women were 22 per cent more likely to report Covid-19 symptoms. 

They reported typical tell-tale signs of a persistent cough and loss of taste and/or smell (anosmia).

But they reported a fever, hoarse voice, loss of appetite and muscle pains at far higher levels. 

Often in studies that rely on self-reporting Covid-19 symptoms say the higher the number of symptoms, the more severe the disease.

This study measured severe Covid-19 based on if the patients were hospitalised or needed respiratory support.

Post menopausal women were four per cent more likely to be hospitalised and 60 per cent more likely to need respiratory support than those still menstruating.

But the experts admitted it was not a significant difference. The findings were not published in a medical journal. 

Academics did not look at whether certain groups of women were likely to catch the virus in the first place. 

Older people are more vulnerable to the coronavirus because their immune systems are weaker and they cannot clear the virus as quickly. 

But the researchers adjusted the results for age, as well as body mass index (BMI) and smoking which are both suspected as risk factors for Covid-19.

The link was still apparent after accounting for these risk factors.   

Upon closer inspection, post-menopausal women were found to be most at risk of Covid-19 if they were aged between 45 and 50 years old.   

Dr Costeira told MailOnline: ‘Based on the data we have we were unable to tease why women 45-50 were the ones driving our results.’

WHY MIGHT OESTROGEN BE PROTECTIVE AGAINST COVID-19? 

It is already known that the response to viral infections differ between females and males, but untangling why is difficult and is based on chromosomes, reproductive organs, and sex hormone levels.

Females generally mount greater antiviral immune responses than males during viral infections, which contributes to better clearance of viruses, including SARS-CoV-2. 

Levels of oestrogen can influence how the body functions – including the immune system and how many immune cells are produced. 

And they are variable during the menstrual cycle, high during pregnancy and low after menopause in females.  

Loss of sex hormones due to ageing results in a reduction of immune function in women, scientists say. 

On the other hand, the main male sex hormone testosterone generally has an immunosuppressive effect on the immune system.

The three main symptoms of Covid-19 – loss of taste and/or smell, a fever and persistent cough – were all reported in higher numbers.

And the need for hospitalisation and oxygen treatment were also significantly higher. 

The researchers also looked at whether infected women on hormone replacement therapy were less likely to be hospitalised. 

Academics analysed a separate group of almost 151,200 women who used the Covid symptom app aged between 50 and 65.

Almost 17,800 of them used HRT, which come in the form of pills, patches and skin gels, while the others did not use any form of HRT. 

Women who used HRT were 32 per cent more likely to report Covid-19 symptoms.

This may indicate they are more likely to catch the coronavirus then their HRT-free counterparts.

Or it could be an indicator of disease severity, considering young and healthy people appear to have a milder form of Covid-19 with barely any symptoms. 

However, HRT-users were less likely to hospitalised or need respiratory support than those who did not take HRT.  

This suggests that HRT – which contains artificial oestrogen that helps to relieve menopause symptoms – may help to boost the immune response. 

However, the researchers said that the HRT results should be taken with a pinch of salt because of a lack of data.

They cautioned they didn’t know the type of HRT each women took, the way it was administered or how long they’d received it for. 

Researchers also wanted to know if the contraceptive combined pill offered and form of protection against Covid-19.

The pill contains synthetic forms of the hormones oestrogen and progesterone, unlike to mini pill which only contain progesterone.

The combined pill prevents ovulation by maintaining more consistent hormone levels. It stops oestrogen levels from surging and then falling again. 

Dr Costeira and colleagues looked at just over 64,200 women who used the combined pill and compared them with just over 231,400 women of the same age who did not use the pill. 

Women taking the pill were 13 per cent less likely to report Covid-19 and were 21 per cent less likely to be hospitalised. 

Joint lead author Dr Ricardo Costeira, from King’s College London, said: ‘Thanks to women of the COVID Symptom Study app we were able to show, with relatively large numbers, the significance of studying the sex hormone oestrogen in relation to COVID-19. 

‘We hope that results from our study can help inform ongoing biomedical research and clinical trials in the field.’ 

The study was published on medRxiv and has not yet been peer-reviewed by other experts who may dispute the findings or the way the study was carried out. 

Commenting today, independent experts said the findings were not conclusive.

Dr Edward Morris, president of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, said: ‘This epidemiological study alone does not provide enough information about the impact of hormones on Covid-19 severity.’

Mr Haitham Hamoda, consultant gynaecologist and chair of the British Menopause Society, said: ‘This pre-print does not provide conclusive evidence that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and the combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP) impact Covid-19 severity. 

‘As research is limited in this area we feel that for those women currently using these preparations the benefits of HRT and COCP outweigh any possible impact that they may have on Covid-19. Overall, this is an interesting concept which requires further research.’

Good sleep health more important than ever, UB sleep researcher says - UB Now: News and views for UB faculty and staff

Good sleep health more important than ever, UB sleep researcher says – UB Now: News and views for UB faculty and staff

  • August 4, 2020

Some tips for good sleep.

The unprecedented changes of routine and behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic have led to disruption of good sleep health, another factor in the decline of quality life and adverse health, according to a UB School of Nursing PhD candidate and behavioral sleep researcher.

“Healthy sleep is important to physical, cognitive and psychological well-being. However, people facing the stress of the pandemic are increasingly experiencing poor sleep health, which includes irregular and ill-placement of sleep and wake-up times, difficulty falling or maintaining sleep, and feelings of non-restorative sleep,” says Misol Kwon, who is a student member of several national sleep research associations.

“Advantages of good sleep include optimal brain functioning — which affect mood and memory — and physical health, such as keeping a strong immune system and regulation of hormones,” says Kwon, who teaches an undergraduate course on sleep research under the guidance of Grace Dean, associate professor in the School of Nursing.

“Good sleep also leads to the ability to perform at our best while awake, which includes being vigilant and attentive, and that keeps us safe,” Kwon says.

These health benefits are especially important during the current pandemic, she says.

“I have had one of my dear patients tell me, ‘Sleep is not part of my priority right now. I have far more important things to worry about, like rescheduling my elective surgeries and taking care of my teen kids,’ ” Kwon says.

“I cannot imagine how disruptive this pandemic has been for many. But I want to note that healthy sleep is not only necessary to cope adaptively with the stress of the current crisis, but also is highly beneficial for our physical and mental health,” she says.

“Good sleep health helps us cognitively function better and make better decisions, enhances our mood and energy level, and improves our psychological well-being, especially in times where isolation and home confinement can make us more vulnerable to adverse mental health conditions.”

To help those with a good night’s rest, Kwon compiled a list of sleep tips to restore what she calls healthy sleep. And by healthy sleep, she means having quality sleep, as well as the sufficient seven or eight hours a day for adults recommended by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  • First, set a schedule and routine for wake-up time and bed time, even if it requires using that alarm again. Having a structured day routine like changing out of your pajamas, going for a walk, showering, having a meal — all done at similar times — can be beneficial.
  • Have your mind associate your bed only with sleep and sex. Avoid studying or working, and watching movies and news channels from your bed. This includes — “and I am slightly guilty of this,” she says — avoiding checking emails or social media in bed upon waking. This only prolongs time in bed you are not sleeping.
  • Our internal body clock — also known as the circadian rhythm — drives our sleep-wake cycles by working in sync with light and darkness. So embracing that natural, bright, morning light by drawing the curtains or going for a morning walk can really cue your body to get going, and feeling charged and alert.
  • Similarly, the presence of artificial light like electronic devices at night can disrupt the circadian rhythm. So keep lights dim around the house and avoid using electronic devices one to two hours before bedtime. This helps the body naturally produce melatonin and prepare for sleep.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Avoid or minimize taking naps during the day.
  • Choose familiar and relaxing activities around bedtime. Read a book. Write in a journal or do a puzzle. Pray. Practice mindfulness activities. Listen to something calming. Avoid strenuous exercises right before bedtime.
  • Make sure to keep your sleep environment comfortable, clean, quiet, dark and with a cool temperature. You can use white noise like a fan to block out environmental noise.
  • Last but not least, substances like caffeine, alcohol and nicotine should be used with caution. Avoid caffeine, including caffeinated tea and soda pop, at least six hours before bedtime. Alcohol may initially help you fall asleep faster. However, during sleep, a stimulating effect occurs causing sleep disruption. Nicotine has a direct stimulant effect, and is associated with insomnia and sleep disruption as well.

“Just as practicing hand hygiene is a vital part of the response to this pandemic,” Kwon says, “good sleep hygiene behaviors and habits are much needed now more than ever to fight off anxiety and depression, and boost our immune system during this time of uncertainty.”

Corrections Department Reports 3 COVID Cases at Torrington Prison

Corrections Department Reports 3 COVID Cases at Torrington Prison

  • August 3, 2020

Two staff members and one contract health care worker were reported lab-confirmed positive for COVID-19 at the Wyoming Department of Correction’s prison in Torrington.

The department conducted 935 tests for all inmates, staff and contract staff at the Wyoming Medium Correctional Institution as part of its testing program for all its facilities, according to a news release.

No positive cases were reported for inmates.

So far, the Wyoming Department of Corrections has conducted 2,122 tests at its facilities.

The department previously reported 24 positive test results — 15 inmates, two staff, seven contract staff — at the Wyoming State Penitentiary in Rawlins. Those individuals are currently in recovery.

No positive results were reported at the Wyoming Honor Farm in Riverton.

The department began testing for COVID-19 on Monday at the Wyoming Honor Conservation Camp and Boot Camp in Newcastle.

Those numbers will be reported when all test results are back.

See 25 natural ways to boost your immune system:

US coronavirus cases 'extraordinarily widespread': Live updates | News

US coronavirus cases ‘extraordinarily widespread’: Live updates | News

  • August 3, 2020

  • The United States is in a new phase of the novel coronavirus outbreak with infections “extraordinarily widespread” in rural areas as well as cities, a White House coronavirus experts said, as cases hit 4.6 million with more than 154,000 deaths reported.

  • Millions of COVID-19 tests able to detect the virus within 90 minutes will be rolled out in the UK to boost capacity in the coming months, the country’s health minister has announced, while cases nationwide surpassed 306,000, with more than 46,000 deaths.

  • Brazil has recorded 25,800 additional confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus and 541 deaths, bringing the total to more than 2.73 million and more than 94,000 deaths as of the end of Sunday, according to the country’s health ministry.

  • More than 17.96 million people around the world have been diagnosed with the new coronavirus. Almost 10.62 million patients have recovered and more than 687,000 have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Here are the latest updates:

Monday, August 3

01:15 GMT – Pope appeals to political leaders create jobs

Pope Francis has called on politicians to create jobs so that economies can relaunch from the lockdowns imposed to combat the coronavirus pandemic, according to the Associated Press news agency.

The pope, speaking after the traditional Sunday blessing, said that ’”without work, families and society cannot go forward. Let us pray for this, because this will be a problem in the post-pandemic period, the poverty and the lack of jobs. It requires lots of solidarity and lots of creativity to resolve this problem.”

The pontiff also wished the faithful “some days of rest, and contact with nature, to recharge also in the spiritual dimension.”

The pope’s remarks follow a week in which officials released statistics showing a record plunge in both the US and eurozone economies.

00:55 GMT – Italy’s tally of new virus cases down to 239

The number of new confirmed cases of the coronavirus in Italy nudged lower to 239 in the last 24 hours, while all eight deaths were recorded in Lombardy, the epicentre of the country’s epidemic.

That brings the total number of cases in Italy to 248,070 and deaths to 35,154, AP news agency reported early on Monday quoting the country’s health ministry.

The number of daily cases in Italy has hovered between 200-300 for weeks, mostly related to people arriving from outside of Italy, either foreign workers or migrants.

00:25 GMT – Britain to roll out millions of 90-minute coronavirus tests

UK - coronavirus

Britain’s healthcare system has come under severe strain during peaks in the country’s COVID-19 outbreak, which has killed more than 46,000 people, the fourth highest toll in the world [Andy Rain/EPA]

Millions of COVID-19 tests able to detect the virus within 90 minutes will be rolled out to British hospitals, care homes and laboratories to boost capacity in the coming months, Reuters news agency reported on Monday quoting the country’s health minister.

The tests will comprise 5.8 million tests using DNA and 450,000 swab tests. Neither will need to be administered by a health professional, said Matt Hancock.

Separately, the publicly-funded National Health Service said it would be offering “COVID-friendly” treatments to cancer patients, including drugs that do not have a big impact on the immune system.

Britain’s healthcare system has come under severe strain during peaks in the country’s COVID-19 outbreak, which has killed more than 46,000 people, the fourth highest toll in the world, according to a Reuters tally collated on Sunday.

00:15 GMT – Mexico reports 4,853 new coronavirus cases, 274 more deaths

Mexico’s health ministry has reported 4,853 new confirmed coronavirus cases and 274 additional fatalities, bringing the total in the country to 439,046 cases and 47,746 deaths, according to Reuters news agency.

The government has said the real number of infected people is likely significantly higher than the confirmed cases.

Mexico

Crematory workers are pictured next to a body bag containing the body of victim of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at a crematory in Mexico City on Sunday [Edgard Garrido/Reuters]

00:01 GMT – Brazil registers 25,800 new coronavirus cases, death toll tops 94,000

Brazil has recorded 25,800 additional confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus and 541 deaths from the disease caused by the virus in the past 24 hours, according to Reuters news agency quoting the country’s health ministry.

Brazil has registered more than 2.73 million cases of the virus since the pandemic began, while the official death toll has risen to 94,104 as of the end of Sunday, according to the ministry data.

_______________________________________________________________

Hello and welcome to Al Jazeera’s continuing coverage of the coronavirus pandemic. I’m Ted Regencia in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 

For all the key coronavirus-related developments from yesterday, August 2, click here.


SOURCE:
Al Jazeera and news agencies

Britain to roll out millions of 90-minute coronavirus tests | News

Britain to roll out millions of 90-minute coronavirus tests | News

  • August 2, 2020

by

LONDON (Reuters) – Millions of COVID-19 tests able to detect the virus within 90 minutes will be rolled out to British hospitals, care homes and laboratories to boost capacity in the coming months, the country’s health minister said on Monday.

They will comprise 5.8 million tests using DNA and 450,000 swab tests. Neither will need to be administered by a health professional, said Matt Hancock.

“The fact these tests can detect flu as well as COVID-19 will be hugely beneficial as we head into winter, so patients can follow the right advice to protect themselves and others,” he said.

Separately, the publicly-funded National Health Service said it would be offering “COVID-friendly” treatments to cancer patients, including drugs that do not have a big impact on the immune system.

Britain’s healthcare system has come under severe strain during peaks in the country’s COVID-19 outbreak, which has killed more than 46,000 people, the fourth highest toll in the world, according to a Reuters tally collated on Sunday.

(Reporting by Costas Pitas; editing by John Stonestreet)

British company launches multi-layer immune support formula |

Jack Estes Debrabander Discusses How Vitamin C Injection Could Help Boost Immunity Against Coronavirus |

  • August 1, 2020

Jack Estes Debrabander discusses how vitamin C injection could be used to help boost immunity against the coronavirus pandemic.

ANN ARBOR, MI / ACCESSWIRE / JULY 31, 2020 / IV bars are a growing trend in cities across America. The “bars” are actually centers administering researched and tested vitamin IVs and vitamin injections to patients. The injections or IVs are tailored to suit patient goals, whether those goals are superior hydration, increased vitamin C intake, or others. Jack Estes Debrabander plans on opening in IV bar in the city of Ann Arbor, Mich. He recently discussed how Vitamin C injection could help boost immunity against the coronavirus pandemic.

“Vitamin C is something many people take to boost the immune system, treat a vitamin C deficiency, or improve overall health,” Jack Estes Debrabander said. “Vitamin C injection is a convenient and efficient way to boost the immune system and provide your body the vitamins it needs fight off viruses.”

Jack Estes Debrabander explained that many times, the reason we get sick is because we’ve completely exhausted our bodies. This can be due to nutritional deficits, an abundance of stress, lack of sleep, or a variety of other issues. Jack Estes Debrabander stated that vitamin injections can be a way to immediately boost the immune system and decrease the chances of a cold or virus, like the recent coronavirus, taking hold. An article in Medical News Today stated that while vitamin C injections have not been proven to cure or treat COVID-19, it is though to aid in the reversal of some damage that can be caused by the virus.

“The goal is to enhance the natural immune system of the body,” Jack Estes Debrabander said. “It’s a preventative measure that could help your body fend off viruses and some other illnesses. It could also help reverse some of the damage caused.”

Jack Estes Debrabander added that vitamin C deficiency can also result in joint pain, discoloring of the skin, fatigue, wounds that won’t heal, and swollen or bleeding gums. He described that all of these painful side effects of this deficiency can be prevented by maintaining proper amounts of vitamin C in the body through vitamin C injections.

Jack Estes Debrabander explained that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved vitamin C injections as a means of treating vitamin C deficiency. He stated these injections are an ideal way to boost vitamin C levels when they need to be increased immediately. Injections are also an ideal alternative for anyone who has an aversion to oral supplements. Jack Estes Debrabander added that vitamin C injections can be used to heal wounds more quickly as well as a variety of off-label uses.

“IV bars are safe, convenient, and affordable places to receive vitamin C and other vitamin injections,” Jack Estes Debrabander said. “This is what we want to bring to Ann Arbor — a safe, comfortable place for people to seek superior health and an overall better quality of life. This service could be especially helpful now, during the heart of the coronavirus pandemic.”

CONTACT:

Caroline Hunter
Web Presence, LLC
+1 7865519491

SOURCE: Web Presence, LLC

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