Emmi expands Onken range with ‘immune boosting’ Super Kefir | News

Emmi expands Onken range with ‘immune boosting’ Super Kefir | News

  • June 16, 2021

Onken super kefir

Emmi has expanded its Onken big pot lineup with the launch of a new range of Super Kefir yoghurt pots.

Launching into Tesco and Co-op stores nationally on 5 July, the kefir pots will be available in Strawberry & Pomegranate and Lemon & Ginger flavoured variants which contained 14 “unique” live culture varieties, the supplier said.

The NPD (rsp: £1.50/350g pot) “boosted the immune system”, Emmi claimed, thanks to its use of vitamins B6 and B12. It will later be rolled out in Asda and Ocado in August, with the launch supported by a through the line marketing campaign across summer and autumn, featuring a new TV and editorial advert.

Onken would further promote the launch online through a host of influencer and brand partnerships, Emmi said.

“We know there’s been a huge shift in health trends over the past year, with more and more people taking a greater interest in improving their immunity as a result of the pandemic,” said Emmi UK head of marketing Laura Graham.

“We wanted to champion centuries-old super fruits in our bold new flavour pairings, and show that functional yoghurts are not just terrific for your body – they’re tasty too. These new 350g pots are perfect for those looking to show their immune system some TLC.”

Third Dose of COVID Vaccine Boosts Protection in Transplant Recipients - Consumer Health News

Third Dose of COVID Vaccine Boosts Protection in Transplant Recipients – Consumer Health News

  • June 16, 2021

TUESDAY, June 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) — Researchers say an extra dose of two-dose COVID-19 vaccines may improve immune system protection for organ transplant patients, a group that’s so far responded poorly to two-dose vaccines.

“Our findings suggest clinical trials are warranted to determine if transplant recipients should receive COVID-19 vaccine booster doses as standard clinical practice, similar to what is currently done with hepatitis B and influenza vaccinations for this population,” said study lead author Dr. William Werbel. He is an infectious diseases research fellow at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore.

People who receive a heart, lung, kidney or other solid organ transplant often take drugs to suppress their immune system and prevent rejection, but those drugs can interfere with the body’s ability to make antibodies in response to vaccines.

In two previous studies, only 17% of transplant recipients produced sufficient antibodies after one shot of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine, and only 54% produced sufficient antibodies after the second dose, researchers reported.

Even transplant recipients who produced antibodies had levels well below those typically seen in people with healthy immune systems, the findings showed.

In the new study, the researchers evaluated 30 transplant recipients who previously received two doses of either the Moderna or Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine. None had reported an illness or a positive test for SARS-CoV-2 prior to vaccination. All were taking multiple immunosuppressive medications to prevent organ rejection.

Between March 20 and May 10, all participants got a third dose of either one of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccines, or they got the Johnson & Johnson shot.

“A third of the participants who had negative antibody levels and all who had low positive [antibody] levels before the booster increased their immune response after a third vaccine dose,” said study senior author Dr. Dorry Segev. He directs the Epidemiology Research Group in Organ Transplantation at Hopkins.

A week after receiving their third dose, 23 patients completed a questionnaire and some reported generally mild or moderate side effects. One patient had severe arm pain and another reported a severe headache. No patients reported fever or an allergic reaction.

There was one case of mild organ rejection, according to the report published online June 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Segev said the reactions seem acceptable, given the benefits that vaccines can confer.

Meanwhile, Werbel urged transplant patients and other immunocompromised patients to be careful.

“Although the third vaccine dose appears to raise the immune response of transplant recipients to higher levels than after one or two doses, these people may still be at greater risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection than the general population who have been vaccinated,” he said in a Hopkins news release.

“Therefore, we recommend that transplant recipients and other immunocompromised people continue to wear masks, maintain physical distancing and practice other COVID-19 safety measures,” Werbel added.

More information

The American Society of Transplantation has more on COVID-19.

SOURCE: Johns Hopkins Medicine, news release, June 14, 2021

Third Dose of COVID Vaccine Boosts Protection in Transplant Recipients | Health News

Third Dose of COVID Vaccine Boosts Protection in Transplant Recipients | Health News

  • June 15, 2021

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

TUESDAY, June 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) — Researchers say an extra dose of two-dose COVID-19 vaccines may improve immune system protection for organ transplant patients, a group that’s so far responded poorly to two-dose vaccines.

“Our findings suggest clinical trials are warranted to determine if transplant recipients should receive COVID-19 vaccine booster doses as standard clinical practice, similar to what is currently done with hepatitis B and influenza vaccinations for this population,” said study lead author Dr. William Werbel. He is an infectious diseases research fellow at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore.

People who receive a heart, lung, kidney or other solid organ transplant often take drugs to suppress their immune system and prevent rejection, but those drugs can interfere with the body’s ability to make antibodies in response to vaccines.

In two previous studies, only 17% of transplant recipients produced sufficient antibodies after one shot of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine, and only 54% produced sufficient antibodies after the second dose, researchers reported.

Even transplant recipients who produced antibodies had levels well below those typically seen in people with healthy immune systems, the findings showed.

In the new study, the researchers evaluated 30 transplant recipients who previously received two doses of either the Moderna or Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine. None had reported an illness or a positive test for SARS-CoV-2 prior to vaccination. All were taking multiple immunosuppressive medications to prevent organ rejection.

Between March 20 and May 10, all participants got a third dose of either one of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccines, or they got the Johnson & Johnson shot.

“A third of the participants who had negative antibody levels and all who had low positive [antibody] levels before the booster increased their immune response after a third vaccine dose,” said study senior author Dr. Dorry Segev. He directs the Epidemiology Research Group in Organ Transplantation at Hopkins.

A week after receiving their third dose, 23 patients completed a questionnaire and some reported generally mild or moderate side effects. One patient had severe arm pain and another reported a severe headache. No patients reported fever or an allergic reaction.

There was one case of mild organ rejection, according to the report published online June 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Segev said the reactions seem acceptable, given the benefits that vaccines can confer.

Meanwhile, Werbel urged transplant patients and other immunocompromised patients to be careful.

“Although the third vaccine dose appears to raise the immune response of transplant recipients to higher levels than after one or two doses, these people may still be at greater risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection than the general population who have been vaccinated,” he said in a Hopkins news release.

“Therefore, we recommend that transplant recipients and other immunocompromised people continue to wear masks, maintain physical distancing and practice other COVID-19 safety measures,” Werbel added.

The American Society of Transplantation has more on COVID-19.

SOURCE: Johns Hopkins Medicine, news release, June 14, 2021

Copyright © 2021 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Health expert explains how COVID-19 vaccines strengthen immune system to fight the virus

Health expert explains how COVID-19 vaccines strengthen immune system to fight the virus

  • June 15, 2021

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WBRC) – When getting vaccinated for the COVID-19 shot, it can make you feel crummy for a couple days but doctors say that doesn’t mean your immune system is slacking.

Even if you experience side effects, doctors say the vaccine does not weaken your immune system, instead, it strengthens it.

COVID-19 vaccines strengthen the immune system’s response to the virus, and the body having chills or fatigue is your immune system ramping up its power.

“We know that immune response can vary,” explained ADPH’s Dr. Karen Landers.

The data supports the conclusion that getting the vaccine will lessen the potential of a really bad case of COVID if you’re one of the people to contract it after getting the shot.

“Persons are less likely to have a severe illness, less likely to be hospitalized and they are less likely to die,” said Dr. Landers.

The vaccine arms the immune system with fighters, but they don’t always win; 800 Alabama residents who got the vaccine, got COVID after.

“We’ve had 54 people hospitalized which is an exceedingly small number,” said Dr. Landers.

She says the shot is the only surefire way to give your body the tools to effectively ward off worse case-scenarios.

Breakthrough cases are usually identified in people who go to the doctor with symptoms, so if you do have symptoms go get tested.

Copyright 2021 WBRC. All rights reserved.

Hints that century-old TB vaccine offers an immune boost against Covid-19 | News

Hints that century-old TB vaccine offers an immune boost against Covid-19 | News

  • June 11, 2021

There are indications that BCG revaccination might protect against Covid-19. The latest results come from a Greek study published as an as yet un-peer reviewed preprint on medRxiv.

BCG – Bacillus Calmette–Guérin – celebrates its 100th anniversary this summer and remains the only approved vaccine against tuberculosis. Developed by French bacteriologists Albert Calmette and Camille Guérin from a bovine relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it was first given to an infant in a Parisian hospital in July 2021.

It was recognised early on that BCG vaccination appeared to reduce death from diseases beyond just tuberculosis. Immunologists have long suspected that this live vaccine primes the immune system to better fight infection. Last year, it was hypothesised that BCG vaccination may protect against Covid-19.

The Greek preprint – yet to be peer reviewed – reported that BCG revaccination resulted in a 68% risk reduction for Covid-19 infection, clinically or virologically confirmed. Five patients receiving a placebo developed severe disease but just one in the BCG vaccine group. However, the trial was relatively small with only around 300 volunteers. ‘It is interesting data, but a small study with high loss to follow-up,’ says Frederik Schaltz-Buchholzer, an epidemiologist at the University of Southern Denmark, who is involved in the Danish BCG trials. ‘We shouldn’t be opening champagne bottles just yet. We have a lot of trials still going on.’

Data from large trials of BCG revaccination in healthcare workers are now in the works. However, in January, a Dutch study of 6132 patients drew attention to initial findings that the vaccine did not offer protection against Covid-19 symptoms in elderly people.

Immunologist Mihai Netea, who was involved in the Greek and Dutch study, says an important difference between them may be that older Greeks received the BCG vaccine as children, whereas people in countries such as Italy, the Netherlands and Belgium never received one. ‘It might be that the T cell response is different in those who have previously been exposed to BCG, and that the innate immune response is also boosted further by a second administration,’ says Netea, who led studies showing how BCG re-programs immune cells.

Large BCG trials for Covid are underway

Most of the BCG trials worldwide for Covid-19 are in healthcare workers, with more than 2500 volunteers in Brazil. These are part of the Brace trial, which has recruited over 7500 healthcare workers at 34 sites in Brazil, the Netherlands, Spain, the UK and Australia. This study is led by Nigel Curtis, a vaccine scientist at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and University of Melbourne, Australia, with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The main question posed is whether the off-target effects of BCG boosts innate immunity and thereby lessens the severity of Covid-19, says Curtis.

A trial of over 1200 healthcare workers is also underway in Denmark, and a trial with older volunteers that is still recruiting there. The former trial was stopped early, because healthcare workers began receiving Covid-19 vaccines. This is an issue with other BCG trials carried out in Europe and the US, where trial participants became eligible for Sars-CoV-2 vaccines. Epidemiologists at the University Medical Centre Utrecht, the Netherlands, have now invited BCG trials to take part in a meta-analysis. The aim is to increase the statistical power by combining the data from all ongoing trials now, rather than waiting until the trials are finished, explains immunologist Henri van Werkhoven at Utrecht.

BCG is not the only existing live vaccine under evaluation. The Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis is coordinating an international trial to investigate if the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine protects healthcare workers from Sars-CoV-2. Also, a recent observational study from India suggests that an immune therapy with killed mycobacterium reduced hospitalisations from Covid-19.

‘BCG revaccination in countries with high pressure load may be useful in countries where classical vaccines are not available. Of course, larger studies from developing countries would be needed to definitively prove that,’ comments Netea. Production of BCG would also need to be ramped up.

These results will be important for future pandemics ‘in order to get even a partial protection from the beginning, so you don’t have to close economies and have so much suffering’, Netea says. He adds that thankfully ‘we have other vaccines that are much more effective [for Covid-19], so the efforts should be put in there’.

Common Antidepressent Might Help Immune System Attack Cancer - Cerritos Community News

Common Antidepressent Might Help Immune System Attack Cancer – Cerritos Community News

  • June 10, 2021

 

June 10, 2021

(UCLA) ~ A class of drug called monoamine oxidase inhibitors is commonly prescribed to treat depression; the medications work by boosting levels of serotonin, the brain’s “happiness hormone.”

A new study by UCLA researchers suggests that those drugs, commonly known as MAOIs, might have another health benefit: helping the immune system attack cancer.

Their findings are reported in two papers, which are published in the journals Science Immunology and Nature Communications. “MAOIs had not been linked to the immune system’s response to cancer before,” said , senior author of the study and a member of the “What’s especially exciting is that this is a very well-studied and safe class of drug, so repurposing it for cancer isn’t as challenging as developing a completely new drug would be.”

Recent advances in understanding how the human immune system naturally seeks out and destroys cancer cells, as well as how tumors try to evade that response, has led to new cancer immunotherapies — drugs that boost the immune system’s activity to try to fight cancer. In an effort to develop new cancer immunotherapies, Yang and her colleagues compared immune cells from melanoma tumors in mice to immune cells from cancer-free animals.

Immune cells that had infiltrated tumors had much higher activity of a gene called monoamine oxidase A, or MAOA. MAOA’s corresponding protein, called MAO-A, controls levels of serotonin and is targeted by MAOI drugs.

“For a long time, people have theorized about the cross-talk between the nervous system and the immune system and the similarities between the two,” said Yang, who is also a UCLA associate professor of and a member of the “So it was exciting to find that MAOA was so active in these tumor-infiltrating immune cells.”

Next, the researchers studied mice that didn’t produce MAO-A protein in immune cells. The scientists found that those mice were better at controlling the growth of melanoma and colon tumors. They also found that normal mice became more capable of fighting those cancers when treated with MAOIs.

Digging in to the effects of MAO-A on the immune system, the researchers discovered that T cells — the immune cells that target cancer cells for destruction — produce MAO-A when they recognize tumors, which diminishes their ability to fight cancer.

That discovery places MAO-A among a growing list of molecules known as immune checkpoints, which are molecules produced as part of a normal immune response to prevent T cells from overreacting or attacking healthy tissue in the body.

Cancer has been known to exploit the activity of other previously identified immune checkpoints to evade attack by the immune system. In the the scientists report that MAOIs help block the function of MAO-A, which helps T cells overcome the immune checkpoint and more effectively fight the cancer. But the drugs also have a second role in the immune system, Yang found.

Rogue immune cells known as tumor-associated macrophages often help tumors evade the immune system by preventing anti-tumor cells including T cells from mounting an effective attack. High levels of those immunosuppressive tumor-associated macrophages in a tumor have been associated with poorer prognoses for people with some types of cancer.

But the researchers discovered that MAOIs block immunosuppressive tumor-associated macrophages, effectively breaking down one line of defense that tumors have against the human immune system. That finding is reported in the Nature Communications paper.

“It turns out that MAOIs seem to both directly help T cells do their job, and stop tumor-associated macrophages from putting the brakes on T cells,” Yang said. Combining MAOIs with existing immunotherapies Yang said she suspects that MAOIs may work well in concert with a type of cancer immunotherapies called immune checkpoint blockade therapies, most of which work by targeting immune checkpoint molecules on the surface of immune cells.

That’s because MAOIs work on MAO-A proteins, which are inside cells and function differently from other known immune checkpoint molecules. Studies in mice showed that any of three existing MAOIs — phenelzine, clorgyline or mocolobemide — either on their own or in combination with a form of immune checkpoint blockade therapy known as PD-1 blockers, could stop or slow the growth of colon cancer and melanoma.

Although they haven’t tested the drugs in humans, the researchers analyzed clinical data from people with melanoma, colon, lung, cervical and pancreatic cancer; they found that people with higher levels of MAOA gene expression in their tumors had, on average, shorter survival times.

That suggests that targeting MAOA with MAOIs could potentially help treat a broad range of cancers. Yang and her collaborators are already planning additional studies to test the effectiveness of MAOIs in boosting human immune cells’ response to various cancers. Yang said MAOIs could potentially act on both the brain and immune cells in patients with cancer, who are up to four times as likely as the general population to experience depression.

“We suspect that repurposing MAOIs for cancer immunotherapy may provide patients with dual antidepressant and antitumor benefits,” she said.

The experimental combination therapy in the study was used in preclinical tests only and has not been studied in humans or approved by the Food and Drug Administration as safe and effective for use in humans.

The newly identified therapeutic strategy is covered by a patent application filed by the UCLA Technology Development Group on behalf of the Regents of the University of California, with Yang, Xi Wang and Yu-Chen Wang as co-inventors. a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award.

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Police Searching For Gunman in NY Who Shot Man in the Butt

Police Searching For Gunman in NY Who Shot Man in the Butt

  • June 10, 2021

Ouch! Police are asking for your help, as yet another shooting has left a victim in a painful and somewhat embarrassing situation. Sadly, cases like this across the area have skyrocketed over the past year. Stories like this have lead some to question whether or not they want to venture out to a place that once touted itself as the “safest big city in the world”.

ABC is saying that the incident took place early Wednesday morning in Foxhurst, when a man was approached by another man wearing a black ski mask. Police say the masked man then pulled a gun and shot the other man, seemingly out of nowhere. ABC says the bullet struck the victim in the buttocks. According to police reports, the gunman only said one word.

Yo!

Not too many other details are known at this time, however ABC says the alleged gunman was last seen running off towards East 167th Street. The man shot in the butt was taken to a nearby hospital, and has been listed in stable condition. Police did not indicate if the gunman and the victim knew one another.

This might make you think back closer to home in the Hudson Valley, when a Bronx man claims he was shot in the rear end, while walking in Poughkeepsie, causing him to fall and strike his head. However, this particular blast to the butt appears to have been a hoax. Upon x-rays and closer examination, it was determined that there were no bullets lodged in the man’s buttocks. Police say the man was “highly intoxicated” at the time. Police also said the victim’s story was inconsistent and that he became uncooperative. The night of the phantom butt shot happened in May 2020.

KEEP READING: See 25 natural ways to boost your immune system

Fully-vaccinated Napa woman dies from virus – Red Bluff Daily News

Fully-vaccinated Napa woman dies from virus – Red Bluff Daily News

  • June 8, 2021

A Napa woman has died of COVID-19 despite being fully inoculated, offering a sharp reminder that vaccinated people are not invincible, especially if they are medically vulnerable and the virus is still circulating widely.

“No vaccine is 100% effective, but this does not diminish the urgency and importance of getting vaccinated, especially as more variant strains emerge,” said Napa County Public Health Officer Dr. Karen Relucio. “Vaccines provide exceptional protection against death and illness from the virus and all residents should continue to get vaccinated to protect themselves and others.”

The woman, who was not identified, died Wednesday after a prolonged hospitalization. She had underlying medical conditions and was over the age of 65.

Out of more than 17 million fully vaccinated Californians, there have been 5,305 post-vaccination COVID-19 cases identified as of May 26 – a “breakthrough” rate of 0.03%, according to the state Department of Public Health.

Of these, at least 373 people were hospitalized and least 40 have died. It is not known if the primary cause of hospitalization or death was COVID-19 or if there were other causes, CDPH said.

There is little data about vaccines’ effectiveness in people with underlying health problems, especially immune impairment, because they weren’t included in the vaccines’ initial trials.

But there is growing evidence that people who are immunocompromised may not mount a strong response to the vaccine.

That underscores the importance of widespread vaccination, health experts say. Vulnerable people are insulated only when everyone else is vaccinated, so the virus can’t find enough people to infect and stops its deadly spread.

Dr. Brian Schwartz, professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at UCSF Health, said it’s particularly important to vaccinate friends and family members of people with compromised immune systems.

“You want to build a wall of immunity at home… That’s going to significantly reduce the chance of getting infected,” he said.

People with weakened immune systems should also wear masks and keep distance between themselves and unvaccinated people, he said.

In March, a fully vaccinated Chicago man died of COVID-19 after dining out with friends, one of whom tested positive for the virus in the days following the meal. The man who died had been diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia in 2019.

People can be immunocompromised for varying reasons, Schwartz said.

“It’s a heterogeneous group. There’s lots of different medications that affect different pathways of the immune system and therefore you’re going to expect to see different responses to vaccines,” he said..

They may be on medicines to suppress their immune system if they suffer from an autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, lupus or Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis.

Some medicines — such as Rituximab, methotrexate and predisone — deplete the B cells that the body needs to make antibodies, according to Dr. Lianne Gensler, professor of medicine in the Division of Rheumatology at the San Francisco Veterans Administration.

When vaccinated, their bodies produce antibodies – but not enough of them. In one study, there was a three-fold reduction in antibody levels in vaccinated people with autoimmune disease, as compared to healthy people. Steroids produced a ten-fold drop.

Chemotherapy for cancer treatment also dials down the immune system. Some blood cancers can also put people at risk. While people with breast and gastrointestinal cancer had a 95% response to the vaccine, those with chronic lymphocytic leukemia only had a 23% response.

People who have received organ and bone marrow transplants and are on anti-rejection medications, which reduce their natural defenses, are vulnerable. One study found a modest 38% to 59% antibody response to vaccines in people who had received an organ transplant.

Medical tests – specifically, a test which measures the “anti-spike IgG antibody” – can reveal the strength of an immune response.  But it is not yet known how many antibodies are necessary to be protective. And these tests don’t measure a second arm of the immune system, involving T cells.

Even partial immunity can help, though. For people who are vaccinated but still get sick, there is evidence that their risk of severe illness and death is less than in those with similar risk factors who are not vaccinated, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Scientists are seeking ways to boost the immune response in these vulnerable patients. They are researching whether they need higher-dose vaccines. Or maybe they need a later “booster.”  Perhaps they may get better protection if their immune-suppressing treatment is suspended during vaccination.

“This is an area that we need to continue to learn more about,” said Schwartz. “Right now, we just don’t have enough information to make really good judgments.”

Increasing Amount of Consumers Turning to CBD Products to Strengthen Immune System | News

LivAgeWell, an integrative health and wellness platform by Dr. Mani Kukreja, introduces new course on optimizing immunity | News

  • June 6, 2021

BIRMINGHAM, Ala., June 6, 2021 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — LivAgeWell, an integrative health and wellness platform by Dr. Mani Kukreja, offers a full-range of consultation and advisory support to achieve wellness and lifestyles goals. Dr. Mani’s practice is based on using a holistic approach by addressing the root causes of illness and aging by implementing healthy nutrition, stress management, detoxification, and lifestyle changes into daily routines.

In these extraordinary times of uncertainty, anxiety, and stress, taking care of your immunity is more important than ever. LivAgeWell has developed the #21dayimmunityreset course to help optimize physical immunity, strengthen mental resilience and adapt to the new normal and beyond. According to Dr. Mani, “The underlying cause of stress, fatigue, hormonal imbalance, indigestion, chronic infection and brain fog could well be due to a dysfunctional immune system.

The immune system is the first and last line of defense in the human body. A weak immune system hosts numerous diseases and illnesses, therefore it is very important to understand, what immune system does, how it works, and what its individual components are. With the right knowledge and tools to implement balanced nutrition, exercise, quality sleep, and emotional resilience, you can make the right choices in your journey to health and wellness.”

The #21dayimmunityreset course consists of 7 modules that cover everything from the basics of immune system and balanced nutrition to quality sleep and mindfulness & emotional wellbeing. Subscribers will also receive a 21-day meal plan to help reset and integrate immune-boosting foods accompanied by Dr. Mani’s favorite breakfast, lunch, and dinner recipes. In addition subscribers will receive a 45+ page downloadable course book, and 15% off personalized one-on-one consultations with the integrative health and wellness expert.

Media Contact

Mani Kukreja, Livagewell, +1 205-540-2540, mani@livagewell.net

Twitter, Facebook

 

SOURCE Livagewell

How To Strengthen Your Immune System Naturally? 7 Habits To Swear By!

How To Strengthen Your Immune System Naturally? 7 Habits To Swear By! – The pink report news

  • June 4, 2021

The whole world is facing the deadly effect of coronavirus since 2020 and we all take a toll on our minds for the safety of ourselves and our families. This global crisis can be dealt with with a good healthcare system and proper vaccination but what can we do at our homes to take care of ourselves? 

We all know boosting our immunity can help you fight not just coronavirus but other health diseases as well. So, how can you naturally strengthen your immune system? Is there anything you can do for yourself to keep yourself safe from diseases? 

Well, yes! There are different things you can do for your body and mind to help you achieve stronger immunity. 

In this article, you’ll find how to boost your immune system to fight several diseases. Read on to know more! 

Also read: Self Pleasure Guarantees An Orgasm But Health Too: 5 Ways Masturbation Affect Immunity

What is the immune system of your body? 

Before you want to achieve a healthy immune system, understand what the immune system is and how it works? Immunity is your body’s capability to fight off diseases and infections. 

The stronger the immune system, the quicker you recover from diseases and infections inside your body. The immune system is a complex network of cells and proteins that defend the body against infections and diseases. 

It keeps the record of every microbe it has fought and defeated and destroys the microbe as soon as it enters inside your body. What a warrior! 

Also read: Ashwagandha For A Healthy Lifestyle: 8 Ashwagandha Supplements To Buy Online

A weak immune system can lead to allergic diseases, immunodeficiencies and autoimmune disorders. The fever you get is an immune system response. A rise in body temperature can kill the microbes inside your body and it also triggers a repair process in the body. 

The immune system is one of the body’s defences to fight off microbes in the body so it’s very important to keep it strong so that it functions properly, especially during this pandemic time.

Tips to boost your immune system naturally 

Even if you feel healthy and fine, it’s important to give your body everything that it requires to build a strong immune system. Your immunity is what keeps you healthy by fighting off illnesses. So, why not care for it? 

Strengthening your immune system requires several changes in diet and lifestyle that most people find very difficult to practice but once you make a habit of these little things. 

Here are some things you can do to boost your immune system: 

Get a good night sleep 

You need at least 7-8 hours of good quality sleep to keep your immune system going strong. Prioritise your sleep and if you need help with insomnia, go to a therapist. Sleep and immunity are strongly tied to each other.

Getting good quality sleep can help you strengthen your immune system naturally. Limit the screen time an hour before bed and sleep in a well ventilated and darkroom. 

Maintain a healthy diet 

It is said that “you are what you eat.” Truly, you can’t contradict this statement. A healthy diet is key to a strong immune system. This means eating plenty of vegetables, fruits, seeds and healthy fat. 

Make sure you are getting enough micronutrients that help you build a strong immune system. This includes Vitamin B6 (Chicken, Salmon, Green Vegetables etc), Vitamin C (Citrus Fruits, Spinach etc) and Vitamin E (Almonds, Sunflower Oil, Peanut Butter etc) 

Also read: Say Bye To Carbs By Adding 7 Low Carb Grains To Your Diet

Focus on physical activity

Physical activity or exercise is crucial if you want to build a strong immune system. A sedentary lifestyle can make you prone to a weak immune system. 

It doesn’t just improve your physical health but also helps you achieve good mental health. Exercise boosts circulation making it easier for immune cells to travel easily throughout the body. 

So focus on staying as active as you can. 

Drink plenty of water

Drinking water can help you achieve a healthy body and mind. It may not directly help you get a stronger immune system. However, lack of hydration or dehydration can make you vulnerable to illnesses. 

Staying hydrated helps you prevent hydration, improves your mood, concertation, digestion and heart and kidney function. So drink plenty of water to keep yourself away from illnesses. 

Take care of your mental health 

Stressing can take a huge toll on your body and your brain. For boosting your immune system, make sure you destress yourself. Long term stress can cause inflammation as well as imbalances in immune function.  

Lively activities like meditation, exercise, yoga, sports etc can help you distract your mind from negativity. Push your mind towards positive elements and always practice gratitude for a healthier mindset. 

Get help if you see signs and symptoms of deteriorating mental health. 

Also read: Tag, Like, Share: Impact of Instagram On Women’s Mental Health

Avoid drinking alcohol

Drinking alcohol might seem fun and exciting but if not consumed moderately, alcohol can cause negative effects on your health, including deteriorated immune function. 

High levels of alcohol in the body can slow down your recovery rate and trouble your normal immune system. With this, your body becomes prone to illnesses like pneumonia, respiratory diseases, liver diseases etc.  

Limit your alcohol consumption as much as you can. If you don’t drink already, do not start.  

Also read: Feeling Tired All The Time? 6 Effective Ways To Boost Energy Levels!

Say no to smoking 

Just like alcohol, smoking cigarettes can also negatively affect your immune system. The chemicals released by cigarette smoke can interfere with the function of your immune system. 

It also worsens viral and bacterial infections. Stop smoking and avoid it as much as possible. 

These were some natural ways to boost your immune system and say goodbye to diseases. A stronger immune system means a healthier you. So practice self-care and stay stress-free to stay healthy! 

Read next: What’s The Difference Between Active And Passive Immunity And How To Build Them?

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