Mid-Coast Maine Pumped With Elev8 Energy & Nutrition

Mid-Coast Maine Pumped With Elev8 Energy & Nutrition

  • June 15, 2021

What started as a way for clients working out at the gym to get a post workout protein shake has turned into a full business open to the public. Elev8 Enery and Nutrition opened in February 2020 and has been growing strong ever since. They were so successful when they opened they sold out and needed to close for a few days just to restock.

The business was started by Richard Eaton and Hunter Grindle and is not your average smoothie and juice bar. Elev8 Energy and Nutrion offers not only low calorie flavored teas with intriguing names such as “snake bite” and “mother of dragons” but also has protein smoothies, energy rich snacks, protein coffees (what an amazing concept), sandwiches and salads. Their Facebook page also just announced they will be offering breakfast sandwiches!

Elev8 Enery and Nutrition

They offer daily specials like the “unicorn”, “habiscis passion fruit” and “blue nova”. It is not unusual for these specials to sell out. They also announced on their Facebook page that you can sign up for their loyalty program and get daily emails. That makes life easy, I like things easy and delicious.

They are also family friendly! They have seating if you want to enjoy you meal and tea right there. They offer kids sized drinks (without the caffeine) and support the community in many ways.

This Is a great example of a small local business doing well in spite of the obstacles. Buy local and support your local businesses. Stop by and check them out.


 

KEEP READING: See 25 natural ways to boost your immune system

KEEP READING: 15 Natural Ways to Improve Your Sleep

COVID-19 Recovery Diet: Foods to Eat if You Have Tested Positive For Coronavirus

COVID-19 Recovery Diet- Foods to Eat if You Have Tested Positive For Coronavirus

  • June 14, 2021

When ill, one’s body undergoes a taxing time, as it is depleted of nutrition and energy in its battle against the infection. Not only is immunity compromised but overall health deteriorates as the body tries to overcome the disease and recuperate. The body’s response in the case where one has tested positive for the coronavirus is similar, with the infection affecting different people with different levels of severity. Also Read – Milkha Singh’s Wife, Nirmal Kaur, Dies Due To Covid-19 Complications

As the second wave of COVID-19 infections continues to sweep through the country, it has impacted thousands of people to date. With symptoms ranging from mild flu-like symptoms to severe cases affecting the lungs, respiratory system, heart, and even the brain, the short- to long-term impact of the virus on one’s body are pronounced. From debilitating weakness to the loss of smell and taste, the infection often leads to the loss of overall appetite. All of this, combined with multiple lockdowns imposed by the government to curb the spread of the infection and suggestions of home quarantine in case of mild to moderate COVID positive cases for otherwise healthy individuals might result in the alteration of normal food-related practices. With access to markets is limited, the accessibility to fresh produce too might be impacted leading to the potential of consuming more highly processed foods that are high in sugar, fats and salt. Also Read – Tamil Nadu Lockdown Eased, Unlock Process in 27 Districts From Monday | Check Details

At times like this, when one’s immune system needs to be stronger than ever, good nutrition is a must. Not only one must continue to be mindful of what they consume but planning a healthy and wholesome diet that meets the daily nutrition requirements of the body is absolutely essential. A balanced diet along with basic exercises to aid deep breathing and relaxation of both, body and mind, goes a long way in aiding the body’s fight against the COVID-19 infection and getting you back up on your feet. Also Read – Sputnik V Rollout in Delhi’s Indraprastha Apollo Hospital by Next Week

Shona Prabhu, Sports Nutritionist and founder of NutrifyMyDiet & Supporter of Right To Protein shares key factors to keep in mind while planning and managing your diet during COVID-19 infection which will boost your overall recovery process.

Known as the building blocks of the body, proteins help build muscles and tissue, repair cells and boost immunity. Proteins are essential to overcome the wear and tear of your body’s cells, which is especially accelerated when COVID positive, and it is critical to include adequate sources of protein in one’s daily diet during the recovery and post-recovery phase. In addition, proteins replenish energy, making them the perfect nutrients to overcome weakness, while improving gut health and overall digestion. Therefore, meeting one’s daily protein requirement is of the essence when affected by COVID-19. A daily protein intake of 1 g per kg body weight throughout the day on a regular basis can play a strong role in recovery.

Be it warm lentil or chicken soup to soothe a sore throat; milk and milk products such as cheese, paneer, and yogurt to whip up healthy salads and comfort curries; soybean products such as tofu and soy chunks to recreate flavoursome Asian stir-fries to satiate the tastebuds; baked fish casseroles such as salmon and mashed potatoes on the side for a balanced helping of proteins. Soybeans are also rich in vitamin C, folate as well as omega-3 fatty acids that help build and maintain a healthy body. You can make keema with soy granules or bake with a healthy twist of soy flour and soy milk, the options, are plenty.

While most of us count our daily intake of calories during other times, for those suffering or recovering from COVID-19, the absence of calories in one’s diet could actually cause more harm than good when your body is in dire need of energy. Important for the smooth functioning of the heart and lungs, the inclusion of calorie-dense foods in your diet is critical. Ensure that the calories being consumed are healthy – be it whole grains such as wheat, maize and rice, potatoes, cereals, bread, and pasta – add a daily dose of calories to your meals to recover faster. Including nuts and dry fruits such as almonds, walnuts, dates and more as mid-meal snacks when one’s appetite is waning can be beneficial. Also, a lot of these foods contain proteins in varying amounts; therefore they contribute to one’s overall protein requirements.

Along with a protein-rich diet, it is imperative to intake an adequate amount of Vitamin C during the course of recovery. It is key to the recovery process as it contains anti-oxidants and boosts overall immunity. With COVID-19 known to affect one’s respiratory system adversely, a daily shot of Vitamins C is crucial. Fresh fruits such as oranges, muskmelon, mango, pineapple, or even guavas, avocados, kiwis and grapefruit, which are also rich in protein are ideal sources of Vitamin C. Toss them into a healthy smoothie made of regular milk, soy or almond milk or create a rainbow-hued fruit salad – make sure you get your double dose of Vitamin C and protein.

With an adequate intake of protein to keep our immunity in order during COVID, it is equally important to consume a sufficient amount of fiber, and soy is one of those ingredients that can take care of both protein and fiber at the same time. Recently, The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India detailed the importance of adding soy foods to our diet. Soy foods are made from soybeans, a wholesome source of high-quality protein, making them a perfect option for those who follow a strict vegetarian diet.

In addition to all of the above, ensure that you remain hydrated throughout the day. Drink plenty of water as it contains zero calories and has proteins and Vitamin C – it is important that your body receives enough and more hydration. To further maintain a healthy diet, limit your sugar and salt intake and replace saturated fats such as butter and ghee with healthier and unsaturated fats such as olive, soy, or sunflower oil while cooking as recommended by the Government of India.

Exercise routinely, be it basic breathing exercises or meditation; follow all recommended medications; and eat healthy home-cooked meals to not only try to beat the COVID-19 infection but bounce back on your feet faster, not too worse from the wear. Stay safe, take all necessary precautions and be #HealthyAtHome!

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Guiding Stars refreshes look of nutrition labeling system

  • June 12, 2021

Ahold Delhaize USA subsidiary Guiding Stars has unveiled a new look for its product nutrition-labeling system designed to aid consumers.

Launched this week, the rebrand includes a new logo and updated star icons that make finding better-for-you products easier, Portland, Maine-based Guiding Stars said. In the center of the logo is a compass that represents the direction Guiding Stars gives as well as an apple representing nutrition. Together, the new symbols reflect a positive approach to communicating nutrition guidance, reinforced by gold stars, according to the company.

In addition, the star icons — found on product packaging, store shelf tags or on online platforms, for manufacturers and grocery retailers who use the system — now include the words “good,” “better” or “best” to more clearly inform consumers which products are most nutritious, Guiding Stars said. Outlined stars also were added to clarify that the Guiding Stars rating comes from a maximum total of three stars.

“As we’re emerging from the pandemic, consumers are more interested in health and nutrition then ever as they care for themselves and their families and manage health conditions, as well as look to boost their immune systems,” Julie Greene, director of Guiding Stars, said in a statement. “As the focus on healthy eating intensifies and Guiding Stars nears our 15th anniversary, it was the right time to freshen our approach and make it even easier for consumers to make good choices.”

Guiding StarsGuiding_Stars-new_look-June_2021.jpg

With the new look, Guiding Stars now includes the words “good,” “better” or “best” to more clearly inform consumers which products are most nutritious.

Customers will begin to see the new branding on product packaging, in stores and on online shopping platforms for subscribing grocers and other clients starting this summer, Guiding Stars said. The new look is now integrated into the Guiding Stars website, which also offers insights and tips on food and nutrition.

Described as a “nutritional navigation” program, Guiding Stars employs a patented algorithm that analyzes and translates nutrition information into a user-friendly, star-based rating system. One star indicates that a product has “good” nutritional value, two stars signifies “better” nutritional value and three stars means “the best” nutritional value. If no Guiding Stars symbol is shown, the item is not nutritionally recommended, not rated yet because it’s new, contains fewer than five calories (such as water or tea), is a dietary supplement or medical food (such as baby formula) or has no nutritional information available.

Part of Ahold Delhaize USA, Guiding Stars launched at Hannaford in 2006 and at Food Lion in 2007 and then was expanded to Giant Food, Giant/Martin’s and Stop & Shop in 2018.

“We’re excited about these branding and visual enhancements because we believe that they will enable our existing clients to better support their customers’ nutrition needs and encourage more manufacturers and retailers to deploy the Guiding Stars system on product packages and physical and digital store shelves,” Greene added. “This can in turn help boost overall community health, which is our goal. We want to make an easy, immediate impact a person’s choice for a drink, meal or snack that makes someone feel good about their food choice and encourages ongoing nutritious choices.”

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COVID-19 Impact on Sports Nutrition and Supplements Market Industry Analysis and Opportunity Assessment 2020-2026 – KSU

  • June 10, 2021

Sports nutrition and supplements is a fast-growing industry with proteins and energy gels being most popular sports nutrition products that are solely used by bodybuilders and athletes. However, due to the outbreak of COVID-19 sports nutrition and supplements are now being used by the majority of the population to boost their immunity. According to a Research Dive published report, the COVID-19 pandemic has boosted the growth of the global sports nutrition and supplements market. By 2026, the global market is estimated to surpass $35,350.0 million, increasing from $13,900.0 million in 2018.

Most Popular Sports Nutrition and Supplements in the Market

Sports nutrition and supplements are the foundation of athletic success. It is a well-made nutrition plan that allow athletes and active adults to perform at their best. Sports nutrition and supplements supplies the right food type, fluids, nutrients, and energy to keep the body functioning at peak levels and well hydrated. A sports nutrition and supplements diet may vary, depending on specific day to day energy demands. Sports nutrition and nutrition and supplements are also used to boost immune system.

 

What will the sample contain?

The sample will give the stakeholder an outline of the report. It will give an overview/framework of the aspects of the market that have been covered in the content of the actual report. The report, unlike the sample, will bear numerical data and market insights associated with a price.

As per the World Health Organization (WHO), maintaining better immune health enhances recovery from several infections and viruses, including coronavirus. In addition, nutritional deficiencies such as that of micronutrients, protein, and vitamin might decrease the immunity and also increase an exposure to infections. These factors are increasing the demand for sports nutrition and supplements products to maintain fitness and help in strengthening the immunity system. Some of the most popular sports nutrition and supplements are:

  1. Creatine

Creatine monohydrate is one of the most popular sports nutrition and supplements available in the market today. It has more published human studies that shows its safety & efficacy comparedto other supplements in the industry. Thus, it is the best-selling workout supplement of all time.

Creatine is a staple ingredient for any individual involved in high-intensity sports requiring fast and explosive movements, such as weightlifting, boxing, rugby, and football. It helps the athlete to less likely fall ill before any workout session or competition. The supplement is often referred as ‘ergogenic’, which means to improve physical performance. A daily intake of creatine can:

  • Increase muscle power output
  • Increase muscle strength
  • Increase lean muscle mass
  • Increase muscle speed
  1. Proteins

Protein is one of the most popular and important sports nutrition and supplement, when it comes to boosting immunity and building & preserving muscle mass. Regular consumption of proteins, contributes to the repair and significant growth of muscle fibres. It is not gender-specific, which means that its benefits can extend to women and men of all ages, fitness levels, and body types. Scientists have long understood that an abundant intake of protein in the diet is essential for proper immune function. Protein bars are high in demand in the COVID-19 pandemic as they help in providing energy and boost immunity.

  1. Multivitamins

Though it is important to ensure the high-quality of a diet, a daily broad-spectrum multivitamin can be useful to make sure that there are no nutritional deficits in the key nutrients required for immunity. A body requires minerals and vitamins to function effectively. Unfortunately, in today’s busy lives, a balanced meal providing the required minerals and vitamins is not an everyday routine. Thus, many consumers use multivitamins to provide the body with the right amounts of nutrients.

When a body doesn’t receive its acclaimed daily intake of vitamins, it becomes harder for the body to perform everyday tasks, which leads to fatigue & other health problems. In terms of sports nutrition and supplements, free radicals are often responsible for muscle ageing and other related problems. Multivitamins boost the immune system, which makes the user less likely to fall ill, and thus these sports nutrition and supplements are witnessing a surge in demand during pandemic crisis.

While you can’t always control your immediate environment, you can truly bolster your immune system with some simple nutritional guidelines to tackle several viruses and infections. Sports nutrition and supplements help in improving energy levels and promote a sense of wellbeing. Choosing the right sports nutrition and supplements all boils down to being an informed consumer.

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Black pepper: Nutrition and health benefits

Black pepper: Nutrition and health benefits

  • June 2, 2021

Black pepper, and its alkaloid component piperine, have associations with many health benefits, including anti-inflammatory effects and potential cancer-fighting properties.

People have used pepper in traditional medicine for thousands of years, especially in Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine. Individuals used it mainly for treating menstrual and ear, nose, and throat disorders.

However, consuming too much black pepper can lead to gastrointestinal side effects, so people need to be careful not to use too much.

Keep reading to learn more about black pepper, including nutritional information, the health benefits, and the potential risks.

The table below shows the amount of nutrients in a teaspoon of ground black pepper, weighing in at 2.3 grams (g).

Currently, there are no dietary guidelines on how much black pepper a person of any sex or age group should consume.

However, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans: 2020–2025 notes that adding herbs and spices can help add flavor to a dish when a person is attempting to reduce their dietary intake of added sugar, sodium, and saturated fat.

There are several potential health benefits of black pepper for the body and brain, and many of them come from the black pepper compound piperine.

High in antioxidants

Piperine, the plant compound in black pepper, has strong antioxidant properties.

The body creates free radicals, unstable molecules that can damage cells, both naturally and in response to environmental stresses. Excess free radical damage can lead to serious health problems, including inflammatory diseases, heart disease, and certain cancers.

Research has shown that diets high in antioxidants could lessen free radical damage. For example, one review of both test tube and rodent studies found that black pepper and piperine supplements may prevent or slow the advancement of free radical damage and related diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer.

Anti-inflammatory benefits

While there is no extensive human research on the anti-inflammatory benefits of black pepper and piperine, several rodent studies suggest that piperine may help ease inflammation.

For example, during one study aimed at learning whether or not piperine could suppress cardiac injury associated with doxorubicin, an anti-cancer drug, researchers found that lab mice injected with piperine experienced reduced inflammation.

Another rodent study suggests piperine’s anti-inflammatory properties may help protect renal tissue damage associated with ischemia-reperfusion. Ischemia-reperfusion refers to tissue damage that occurs when a part of the body does not receive enough oxygen.

Researchers have also found that specific piperine supplements may help decrease the chronic inflammation that people with metabolic syndrome experience, but more human research is necessary.

Antibacterial properties

A handful of reviews and studies point to piperine’s antibacterial potential.

For example, after a small review of studies involving black pepper’s antibacterial properties against gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, researchers concluded the spice could be a powerful ingredient for future therapies against both infectious diseases and foodborne pathogens.

Another larger scale review examined lab and human studies involving the many pharmacological properties of piperine, including antibacterial properties.

Similarly, one test tube study found that piperine and piperlongumine — a component of the long pepper plant — may help fight multidrug-resistant pathogens. The study’s authors concluded that both compounds might be helpful as bioactive compounds for new antibacterial drugs. However, authors from both reviews suggested more research is necessary.

Cancer-fighting properties

Although there have not been any human studies to date, several laboratory studies suggest the piperine in black pepper may have cancer-fighting properties.

For example, one comprehensive review of spices and cancer treatments notes that studies found piperine suppressed cancer cell replication in breast, prostate, and colon cancer.

Similarly, the substance showed promise as a therapeutic agent in treating osteosarcoma, a type of bone cancer. However, more scientists need to conduct more studies to investigate this effect fully.

Increasing “good cholesterol”

Researchers conducted a study of piglets randomly assigned a diet supplemented with or without black pepper and noted changes during their growing and fattening periods.

They found the piglets that consumed a diet supplemented with black pepper experienced a significant increase in high-density lipoprotein — which people call the “good cholesterol” — compared to other piglets.

The researchers believe these results might warrant further studies to explore the potential beneficial effects on lipid metabolism in humans.

Helping blood sugar control

A small 2013 study on humans on the effects of a supplement containing several bioactive food ingredients — including piperine — on insulin resistance found an improvement in insulin sensitivity. This means the hormone insulin was better able to regulate the uptake of glucose.

However, because the supplement contained multiple food ingredients, it is not clear if piperine alone would have produced the same results.

Nutrient absorption and gut health

Research from 2013 suggests black pepper may help boost nutrient absorption, as well as display prebiotic-like behavior, helping regulate intestinal microbiota and enhance gastrointestinal health.

Boosting brain function

Several animal studies have shown piperine may improve brain function, particularly for symptoms associated with degenerative brain conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease.

For example, researchers have found that piperine helped improve memory in rats with Alzheimer’s, as well as reducing the formation of amyloid plaques. These are damaging protein fragments that first develop in the areas of the brain linked with memory and cognitive function.

A study on humans found an association between Alzheimer’s and levels of piperine, but the researchers concluded they were not able to draw a reason for the link and stated more research is necessary.

There is not much scientific evidence to suggest black pepper causes any major health risks and side effects.

While consuming too much black pepper may cause digestive distress, this is true of most herbs and spices. And eating large quantities of black pepper may cause burning sensations in the mouth and throat.

However, some research does suggest that black pepper, or more specifically, piperine, can potentially lead to adverse effects in certain situations.

For example, studies involving rodents and humans have shown that piperine may boost the absorption of certain medicines, such as antihistamines. This might be helpful for poorly absorbed drugs, but it may result in overly high absorption of other medications.

Therefore, it is important to consult a healthcare provider about possible drug interactions before increasing black pepper intake or taking piperine supplements.

Here’s Why Food For The Microbiome Is Good For Human Beings

Here’s Why Food For The Microbiome Is Good For Human Beings

  • May 31, 2021

The human digestive tract, starting with the stomach and leading up to the intestines, is celebrated every year on May 29, on the occasion of World Digestive Health Day (WDHD). We also celebrate the denizens of the human gut, the different types of bacterial colonies that live and thrive within the human digestive system, and their impact on digestion. Beyond digestion, the human gut bacteria (especially the beneficial ones) also have a symbiotic relationship with the human immune system and help prevent many diseases. The WDHD theme for this year was obesity, and a paper published in ‘Nature’ in April 2019, had established a clear role of the bacteria in treating obesity in humans.

If the human gut microbiota is so crucial in keeping humans healthy, it is important that we spend some time understanding what keeps the microbiome healthy. Plus there are beneficial bacteria and harmful ones, and it is key that their balance is maintained.

So, what is the food that these good bacteria consume and what do they produce that helps the host humans? In our markets, we have often seen products marked as “probiotic” and “prebiotic”. While probiotics are the beneficial bacteria cultures, which boost their presence in the human gut, the lesser-known term ‘prebiotics’ are the foods that keep the good bacteria going. It is important for us humans to understand prebiotics, to keep our microbial partners in our gut healthy.

What Are Prebiotics?

Prebiotics are essentially dietary fibers that are selectively utilized by host micro-organisms to produce metabolites that the human body is able to use. These non-digestible carbohydrates such as fructo-oligosaccharides and galacto-oligosaccharides cannot be digested by the enzymes produced by the human body. They help in multiple ways, firstly by helping strengthen the digestive tract. Later, the beneficial microbes break down prebiotics into secondary metabolites that are absorbed into the host and provide multiple health benefits such as stimulation of immune cell activity, for instance. Such interventions have shown to improve immune markers in infants, reduce risk of infections among young children and decrease inflammatory processes among the elderly.

Types of prebiotics that help to nourish our gut microbes

Fructan: Inulin and fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) or oligo fructose is a component of fructan. They are resistant to digestion enzymes such as alpha-amylase, saccharase, and maltase. They increase the growth of Bifidobacterium. Wheat products, barley, onions, shallots, garlic, cabbage, broccoli, pistachio, artichoke, chicory root, and asparagus are high in them.

Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS): GOS is found naturally in mammalian milk. GOS is generated industrially from whey, which is gaining traction as a possible alternative. Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli are greatly stimulated by GOSs. Isolated GOS is also used in the production of fruits and dairy products. GOS and FOS mixes are also included in some infant meals.

Xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS): Plant sources of XOS include Bengal gram husk, wheat bran, straw, barley hulls, brewery waste grains, almond shells, bamboo, and maize cob. It can assist people with type 2 diabetes mellitus lower their cholesterol and LDL. XOS also has antioxidant qualities and is utilised in food items as a gelling agent.

Lactulose: Lactulose is a chemically synthesised sugar that is generated from lactose. Lactulose can be found naturally in heat-treated cow and human milk. Daily doses of 3g lactulose can boost the gut microbiota in healthy people. In hospitals, it is commonly used to treat persistent constipation.

Benefits of prebiotics for gut health

Let us now look at the benefits of consuming the right prebiotics. Gut microorganisms are known to control multiple aspects of the mucosal immune system. The effects of prebiotics can be direct, or indirect by increasing the population of beneficial microbes, especially of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria. Research has shown that prebiotics may help support immunity, digestive health, and gut comfort, which is particularly important for vulnerable consumer groups such as infants.

Prevents Obesity: Important prebiotics plays a crucial role in preventing obesity and ensuring the gut microbiota plays their right role. Firstly it strengthens the gut barrier, prevents the formation of low-grade inflammations, and hence improving metabolic changes that aid weight reduction. Secondly, prebiotics also is seen to increase the secretion of peptides like glucagon the promote satiety or a sense of fullness, and at the same time, they help reduce the synthesis of ghrelin, another peptide that increases the feeling of hunger.

Boosts immunity: Given that the gut contains 70% of our immune system cells, Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), a prebiotic generated from lactose in milk, are not digested in the upper section of the gastrointestinal tract and reach the large intestine where they help the development of beneficial bacteria Bifidobacterium. These bacteria have the ability to create short-chain fatty acids and other metabolites that boost immunological functions and enhance digestive health.

Keeps harmful bacteria in check: Because the beneficial Bifidobacterium compete for food sources and attachment sites on the intestinal mucosa, an increase in beneficial bacteria boosted by the presence of suitable prebiotics can also help reduce the number of dangerous bacteria.

Way forward

There is also a key role for prebiotic food additives in sugar-free foods. Prebiotics are sweet in taste and help mask any bad after-taste of foods, and combine very well with artificial sweeteners to make sugar-free foods tasty. The worldwide prebiotic ingredients market is expected to grow at a considerable CAGR of 10.5% over the next few years. The Covid-19 pandemic has brought the spotlight back on building immunity, health, and wellness. With approximately 37 million diabetics and 400 million overweight people in India, there is an increasing demand for low-sugar foods, which will also increase demand for prebiotic additives in food. 5

Clearly, prebiotics has a dual benefit. While it helps promote digestive health and healthy gut microbiota, it also makes sugar free food tastier. As Indians become more and more aware of the benefits of prebiotics, we will see foods with added prebiotics will find wider acceptance among the health-conscious Indian consumers.

(The author is chief operating officer – Nutrition Sciences at Tata Chemicals.)


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7 science-backed benefits of pineapple, according to dietitians

7 science-backed benefits of pineapple, according to dietitians

  • May 29, 2021
  • Benefits of pineapple include easing digestion, boosting immunity, and helping with weight loss.
  • Many of pineapple’s benefits come from bromelain, an enzyme that acts as an anti-inflammatory.
  • Pineapple is also low in calories and high in vitamin C, manganese, and antioxidants.

Pineapple is the fourth most popular fruit in America – and with good reason. It can be enjoyed on its own, or in fruit salad, desserts, smoothies, and even savory salads or stir-fries. But pineapple isn’t just a tasty ingredient.

In ancient times, this tropical fruit was used in different cultures for medicinal purposes, primarily, as an extract applied to wounds for reducing inflammation. Today, we now know pineapple contains bromelain, an enzyme with anti-inflammatory properties that also may have cancer-fighting potential.

Here are just a handful of pineapple’s science-backed health benefits.

1. Packed with nutrients

A single one-cup serving of pineapple chunks contains:

Nutrient Amount Daily value (DV)
Calories 82.5
Fat 0.2 grams (g)
Vitamin C 78.9 milligrams (mg) 87.7%
Manganese 1.5 mg 65.2%

Vitamin C plays an important role in healing wounds, producing proteins, and absorbing iron, says Colleen Christensen, a registered dietitian with a virtual private practice.

Meanwhile, manganese is an essential mineral for brain and nerve function, calcium absorption, and blood sugar regulation.

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It’s also worth noting that one cup of pineapple contains 8.3 milligrams of the amino acid tryptophan. According to Christensen, this particular amino acid is a precursor to the feel-good, mood-boosting neurotransmitter serotonin.

2. Eases digestion

The bromelain in pineapple may help digestion because the enzyme breaks down proteins. It also reduces inflammation in the GI tract for those with inflammatory bowel disease.
Plus, a serving of pineapple offers 2.3 grams of dietary fiber, which can help bulk up stool and ensures regular bowel movements.

“When you combine the fiber and bromelain, they work as a team to encourage optimal digestion,” says Deborah Malkoff-Cohen, registered dietitian and certified nutritionist at NYC Eat Well.

3. May help with weight loss

Thanks to pineapple’s fiber content, it may also keep you fuller for longer, thereby aiding in weight loss efforts, says Christensen.

While there is limited research on the link between pineapple and weight loss in humans, a 2018 study in rats found pineapple juice decreased fat formation while also increasing the breakdown of fat.

4. High in antioxidants

Antioxidants are substances that protect your cells from free radicals – chemical compounds which may play a role in cancer and heart disease.

Pineapples are rich in a variety of antioxidants like:

Some research indicates phenolic acids offer antimicrobial, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory effects. Meanwhile, flavonoids have the same effects, but also offer protection and cardiovascular disease.

5. May boost immunity

The vitamin C content in pineapple may also help boost your immune system.

“Not only can vitamin C prevent certain infections but it may also help treat some, like certain respiratory and systemic infections,” says Christensen.

A 2014 study found elementary school-aged children who ate canned pineapple experienced fewer viral and bacterial infections in comparison to those who didn’t eat it.

The children who ate the most pineapple had nearly four times more disease-fighting white blood cells than the others. Researchers concluded eating 140 to 280 grams of pineapple daily may reduce infections, or at the very least, help you fight them off more quickly.

6. Soothes coughing

The bromelain in pineapple may help reduce coughing.Related Article Module: 8 of the best home remedies to soothe a cough naturally, according to doctors
“While pineapple likely won’t be a one-stop-cure for your cough it could help to resolve some inflammation,” says Christensen. “Additionally, the hydration it provides may feel good on a sore throat.”

A 2010 review examined natural treatments for tuberculosis and cited pineapple juice as “extremely helpful” in dissolving lung mucus when mixed with a dash of pepper, honey, and salt. This may be because of bromelain’s anti-inflammatory properties.

7. Strengthens bones

Pineapples’ high vitamin C content is also crucial for bone health.

In fact, a 2020 review found individuals who ate foods high in vitamin C had a significantly lower risk of developing osteoporosis and a 34% lower incidence of hip fractures.

Medical term: Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to become weak and brittle, thereby increasing the risk of fractures. It is most common in post-menopausal women.

Manganese may also reduce the risk of spinal bone loss in older women when taken with calcium, zinc, magnesium, boron, vitamin D, and copper. One 2004 study found postmenopausal women who took a supplement with this combination experienced a positive effect on bone density.

Insider’s takeaway

Pineapple is an antioxidant powerhouse that may bolster your immune system, strengthen your bones, and improve digestion.
Christensen says there are few drawbacks to eating pineapple. However, she cautions against eating it in excess if you have acid reflux.

“Pineapples are quite acidic, so eating large quantities may cause some to have symptoms of heartburn,” says Christensen. “Eating large amounts of fiber-containing food may also cause some GI upset, especially if a low-fiber diet is typically consumed.”

Additionally, Malkoff-Cohen says bromelain should be avoided before and after surgery, as well as if you take a blood-thinning medication since it can increase your risk of excessive bleeding.
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7 Benefits and Nutrition Information

7 Benefits and Nutrition Information

  • May 29, 2021
  • Benefits of pineapple include easing digestion, boosting immunity, and helping with weight loss.
  • Many of pineapple’s benefits come from bromelain, an enzyme that acts as an anti-inflammatory.
  • Pineapple is also low in calories and high in vitamin C, manganese, and antioxidants.
  • Visit Insider’s Health Reference library for more advice.

Pineapple is the fourth most popular fruit in America  — and with good reason. It can be enjoyed on its own, or in fruit salad, desserts, smoothies, and even savory salads or stir-fries. But pineapple isn’t just a tasty ingredient.

In ancient times, this tropical fruit was used in different cultures for medicinal purposes, primarily, as an extract applied to wounds for reducing inflammation. Today, we now know pineapple contains bromelain, an enzyme with anti-inflammatory properties that also may have cancer-fighting potential.

Here are just a handful of pineapple’s science-backed health benefits.

1. Packed with nutrients

A single one-cup serving of pineapple chunks contains: 

Vitamin C plays an important role in healing wounds, producing proteins, and absorbing iron, says Colleen Christensen, a registered dietitian with a virtual private practice. 

Meanwhile, manganese is an essential mineral for brain and nerve function, calcium absorption, and blood sugar regulation.

It’s also worth noting that one cup of pineapple contains 8.3 milligrams of the amino acid tryptophan. According to Christensen, this particular amino acid is a precursor to the feel-good, mood-boosting neurotransmitter serotonin.

2. Eases digestion

The bromelain in pineapple may help digestion because the enzyme breaks down proteins. It also reduces inflammation in the GI tract for those with inflammatory bowel disease. 

Plus, a serving of pineapple offers 2.3 grams of dietary fiber, which can help bulk up stool and ensures regular bowel movements

“When you combine the fiber and bromelain, they work as a team to encourage optimal digestion,” says Deborah Malkoff-Cohen, registered dietitian and certified nutritionist at NYC Eat Well.

3. May help with weight loss

Thanks to pineapple’s fiber content, it may also keep you fuller for longer, thereby aiding in

weight loss
efforts, says Christensen. 

While there is limited research on the link between pineapple and weight loss in humans, a 2018 study in rats found pineapple juice decreased fat formation while also increasing the breakdown of fat.

4. High in antioxidants

Antioxidants are substances that protect your cells from free radicals — chemical compounds which may play a role in cancer and heart disease

Pineapples are rich in a variety of antioxidants like:

Some research indicates phenolic acids offer antimicrobial, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory effects. Meanwhile, flavonoids have the same effects, but also offer protection and cardiovascular disease.

5. May boost immunity

The vitamin C content in pineapple may also help boost your immune system. 

“Not only can vitamin C prevent certain infections but it may also help treat some, like certain respiratory and systemic infections,” says Christensen.

A 2014 study found elementary school-aged children who ate canned pineapple experienced fewer viral and bacterial infections in comparison to those who didn’t eat it. 

The children who ate the most pineapple had nearly four times more disease-fighting white blood cells than the others. Researchers concluded eating 140 to 280 grams of pineapple daily may reduce infections, or at the very least, help you fight them off more quickly.

6. Soothes coughing 

The bromelain in pineapple may help reduce coughing.

“While pineapple likely won’t be a one-stop-cure for your cough it could help to resolve some inflammation,” says Christensen. “Additionally, the hydration it provides may feel good on a sore throat.”

A 2010 review examined natural treatments for tuberculosis and cited pineapple juice as “extremely helpful” in dissolving lung mucus when mixed with a dash of pepper, honey, and salt. This may be because of bromelain’s anti-inflammatory properties.

7. Strengthens bones 

Pineapples’ high vitamin C content is also crucial for bone health. 

In fact, a 2020 review found individuals who ate foods high in vitamin C had a significantly lower risk of developing osteoporosis and a 34% lower incidence of hip fractures.

Manganese may also reduce the risk of spinal bone loss in older women when taken with calcium,

zinc
,

magnesium
, boron,

vitamin D
, and copper. One 2004 study found postmenopausal women who took a supplement with this combination experienced a positive effect on bone density.

Insider’s takeaway 

Pineapple is an antioxidant powerhouse that may bolster your immune system, strengthen your bones, and improve digestion. 

Christensen says there are few drawbacks to eating pineapple. However, she cautions against eating it in excess if you have acid reflux.

“Pineapples are quite acidic, so eating large quantities may cause some to have symptoms of heartburn,” says Christensen. “Eating large amounts of fiber-containing food may also cause some GI upset, especially if a low-fiber diet is typically consumed.”

Additionally, Malkoff-Cohen says bromelain should be avoided before and after surgery, as well as if you take a blood-thinning medication since it can increase your risk of excessive bleeding.

COVID19, Pandemic, Nutrition, Nutritionist

COVID and Children: A Nutritionist on What to Eat & What to Avoid for a Robust Immune System

  • May 26, 2021

Although children are not the face of the pandemic, it is not sparing them either. The COVID-19 pandemic will have a lifelong impact on children through indirect effects, including poor diet, impact on mental health, social isolation, closure of schools and healthcare. COVID-19 has diverse impact on nutrition with disrupted food supply and gaps in health and nutrition services. It has led to a double whammy of undernutrition and overnutrition in children.

This universal crisis has pushed additional 140 million children living in developing countries below the poverty line. Of the 132 million going hungry in 2020, 44 million were children. Additional 370 million have missed on nutritious meals due to closure of schools. On the other hand, there is rise in obesity with less physical activity, poor diets and disturbed schedules. A review on obesity in children and adolescents during COVID-19 pandemic notes increase in weight due to changes in dietary behaviours, increased food intake and unhealthy food choices.

WHO IS AT RISK?

COVID surge has led to a calamitous impact on children and a greater risk of violence cutting off the vital support. They are at a loss of access to essential health services, routine immunization and treatment for other diseases. For India, the crisis is even worse with high rates of malnutrition causing further impact on child nutrition and service delivery. COVID will have irrevocable impact on undernutrition, with rise in severe and moderately wasted children due to loss of income and inadequate access to nutrient-rich foods as a result of disruption of supply chain.

The Global Burden of Disease study estimates 11 million (1 in 5 deaths) deaths are globally associated with poor diet and dietary habits. Those below 18 years of age comprise about 8.5 per cent of coronavirus cases and fewer deaths globally. It is rare for children to get affected by COVID-19, with 1 in 1000 case probability. Research indicates less likelihood of children being affected due to presence of distinct immune system capable of producing many different antibodies specific to the virus. Children are the main reservoir for seasonal coronavirus causing common cold/flu, which likely renders immunity against SARS-CoV-2. Review indicates the role of maternal-derived immunity in lower infection and severity of COVID-19 among children.

Children are the main reservoir for seasonal coronavirus causing common cold/flu, which likely renders immunity against SARS-CoV-2. Review indicates the role of maternal-derived immunity in lower infection and severity of COVID-19 among children

Although lesser children are getting infected with the virus, some with underlying conditions—immunocompromised (malnourished children), diabetes, genetic disorders and obesity—can have severe illness. With the pandemic causing poor access to nutritious food, malnutrition and infection tend to co-exist. Even though children are not super-spreaders, but with emerging variants and adults vaccinated, children getting vaccinated could be beneficial to achieving herd immunity. With the onset of vaccine trials for under-12, it is important to focus on good nutrition for improved vaccine efficacy.

HOW TO BE FOOD-WISE

A balanced and healthy diet can ensure a robust immune system and lower incidence of chronic diseases and infections. It is important to ensure children receive a nutritious diet during the crisis. Infants up to 6 months should be exclusively breastfed. For children above 6 months, provide food from at least four food groups, including grains, pulses, fruits & vegetables, milk products, and nuts.

Evidence indicates the role of diets rich in Vitamins and trace elements (zinc, copper, selenium and iron) in strongly supporting the immune system and reducing the risk of infections. Avoids foods that contain high amounts of sugar, salt and fats that can increase the risk of overweight/obesity.

Physical activity and nutrition are known to boost the immune system. Foods rich in Vitamins C, D, and E improve the immune system by increasing the infection-fighting cells. The antioxidant in Vitamins C and E plays an important role in controlling infections and functioning of the immune system. Diets poor in micronutrients (iron, zinc, selenium, Vitamin A) can have negative effect on the immune system; whereas a diet rich in these can have a synergistic role in reducing infection risk. Inclusion of citrus fruits, yellow fruits and vegetables, green leafy vegetables (spinach), garlic, ginger, yogurt, almond, turmeric in child’s diet can help strengthen immunity to fight infections. Also keeping the body hydrated and getting adequate sleep (which helps increase muscle protein synthesis rates) can also help in curtailing the infection.

Physical activity and nutrition are known to boost the immune system. Foods rich in Vitamins C, D, and E improve the immune system by increasing the infection-fighting cells

As rightly said by a Turkish scholar, “Your immune system is (the) best weapon against coronavirus.” Strengthening the immune system with adequate nutrition can help overcome the long-term effects of COVID-19 in children.


This commentary originally appeared in News18.

Walking an Extra 1,000 Steps May Increase Your Life Span

Walking an Extra 1,000 Steps May Increase Your Life Span

  • May 21, 2021

  • New research has found that taking more steps each day could help you live longer.
  • You don’t need to commit to lengthy strolls every day to improve your health.
  • More daily steps has been linked to a range of health benefits, like better heart health, improved sleep quality, and more positive mental health.

New research has found that taking more steps each day could help you live longer.

The findings, which were presented today at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Conference, found that people who took more steps each day had a significantly lower risk of death than those who were less active.

The health benefits were consistent among people who walked in uninterrupted sessions and those who walked in short spurts.

Prior evidence has found walking to have a range of positive health effects, from cardiovascular improvements, better sleep quality, and improved mental health.

You don’t need to commit to lengthy strolls each day to improve your health. Squeezing in spurts of steps through everyday activities has the same health benefits.

“Walking is the easiest and cheapest form of moderate exercise. Aside from supportive shoes, it doesn’t require any specific equipment, and because you don’t need to push yourself hard enough to sweat in order to reap the benefits, you don’t even need special clothes,” Dr. Elizabeth Gardner, a Yale Medicine sports medicine specialist and a team physician at Yale Athletics, told Healthline.

The researchers evaluated 16,732 women ages 60 and older who wore a step counter on their waist between 2011 and 2015.

Each participant’s steps were divided into two groups: longer walks lasting at least 10 minutes and short bursts of walking, such as going upstairs or walking to the car.

The researchers followed up with the study participants for an average of 6 years, until 2019.

They identified a 32 percent decrease in death among those who took at least 2,000 steps a day.

Each increase of 1,000 steps a day was associated with a 28 percent decrease in death.

The health benefits, which plateaued around 4,500 daily steps, were similar among people who walked in short bursts and those who took longer, uninterrupted walks.

According to Dr. Jennifer Wong, a cardiologist and the medical director of noninvasive cardiology at MemorialCare Heart and Vascular Institute at Orange Coast Medical Center in Fountain Valley, California, regular physical activity has been linked to a decreased risk of diabetes and high blood pressure along with improved lipid profiles.

Walking can also help reduce the risk of heart disease, which is the leading cause of death in the United States.

Even a small increase in steps can have a profound impact on cardiovascular health.

In the short term, people who walk more have improved body composition and fitness. In the long term, more daily steps can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease, cardiac events, and death.

Physical activity like walking can also boost muscle strength and help prevent falls and injuries.

“Walking is also an excellent whole body exercise. It utilizes not only the muscles of the whole leg, but also the core and gluteus muscles for stability and propulsion,” Gardner said.

Gardner said changing your pace during a walk can lead to more health benefits. For example, walking at a faster pace for 30-second intervals then slowing down for another 30 seconds can increase your heart rate, which can help burn more calories and boost cardiovascular health, Gardner said.

Evidence suggests that walking more each day can improve quality of sleep.

Research has also consistently found that people who are physically active have better mental health than those who aren’t.

Other studies have found that walking, even leisurely, reduces symptoms of depression and boosts positive emotions and feelings among older adults.

“Walking can help improve the quality of one’s life, increasing energy levels, improving sleep quality, helping with mood, as well as slowing mental decline,” Wong said.

Fitting more bursts of walking into your day — which provide the same health benefits as longer walks, according to this study — may be easier for most people.

Gardner said making small changes in your day is the best way to get in more steps.

Wong recommends taking a walk during a lunch break, cleaning the house, or walking in place while watching TV.

“People can get more steps in by taking the stairs instead of the elevator or parking farther away and walking a longer distance to their final destination,” Wong said.

These small changes can go a long way.

“Not only do these small changes add up, because you don’t need to push yourself enough to sweat, you shouldn’t need to change clothing when you return to your normal daily activities,” Gardner said.

New research has found that taking more steps each day could help you live longer.

You don’t need to commit to lengthy strolls every day to improve your health. Squeezing in bursts of steps through everyday activities has the same health benefits, according to the study.

More daily steps has been linked to a range of health benefits, like better heart health, improved sleep quality, and more positive mental health.

capsimmunesystem.org