Tips for Healthy Eating During Pandemic – NBC Los Angeles

Tips for Healthy Eating During Pandemic – NBC Los Angeles

  • October 20, 2020

Since a vaccine is still in the works to combat COVID-19, we’re left trying just about anything to stay as healthy a possible during a pandemic. One thing that everyone can all do, however, is to boost their immune system with healthy foods.

Health professionals tell NBC 7 if someone gets COVID-19 or the flu, or even both, it’ll most likely be much easier to recover if they’ve been eating foods rich in nutrients

These are immune-boosting foods that can help prepare your body to fight off a virus, cold or flu. Those who have a nutrient-packed diet will also find they sleep better and have more energy since they’re consuming the right minerals.

Nutritionists suggest you load up on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, healthy fats, and lean proteins for dietary success.

It’s also best to plan for groceries so that it could result in purchases of fewer processed, high-salt or high-sugar snacks.

“Processed foods in general, it’s basically synthetic. It’s made from a machine,” said Dr. Amy Lee, who is an expert in weight control, obesity and nutrition. “It’s nothing natural that we actually garden and plant and harvest. So our human bodies basically have to get used to and adapt to all these new synthetic ingredients that we weren’t used to before.”

Lee also suggests families create a schedule or a daily meal plan. A schedule is more predictable for everyone in a household and it can get all involved so they feel connected to the effort in some way, creating motivation.

You can also manage your environment to improve your diet.

If candy and chips aren’t in the kitchen cabinet, then you can’t eat them.

It’s also very important to stay hydrated and drink plenty of water. Health experts recommend that you drink at least eight 8-ounce glasses of water each day, but if you’re outside a lot or exercising, it should be more. Stay healthy!

Tips for Heating During Pandemic – NBC 7 San Diego

Tips for Heating During Pandemic – NBC 7 San Diego

  • October 20, 2020

Since a vaccine is still in the works to combat COVID-19, we’re left trying just about anything to stay as healthy a possible during a pandemic. One thing that everyone can all do, however, is to boost their immune system with healthy foods.

Health professionals tell NBC 7 if someone gets COVID-19 or the flu, or even both, it’ll most likely be much easier to recover if they’ve been eating foods rich in nutrients

These are immune-boosting foods that can help prepare your body to fight off a virus, cold or flu. Those who have a nutrient-packed diet will also find they sleep better and have more energy since they’re consuming the right minerals.

Nutritionists suggest you load up on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, healthy fats, and lean proteins for dietary success.

It’s also best to plan for groceries so that it could result in purchases of fewer processed, high-salt or high-sugar snacks.

“Processed foods in general, it’s basically synthetic. It’s made from a machine,” said Dr. Amy Lee, who is an expert in weight control, obesity and nutrition. “It’s nothing natural that we actually garden and plant and harvest. So our human bodies basically have to get used to and adapt to all these new synthetic ingredients that we weren’t used to before.”

Lee also suggests families create a schedule or a daily meal plan. A schedule is more predictable for everyone in a household and it can get all involved so they feel connected to the effort in some way, creating motivation.

You can also manage your environment to improve your diet.

If candy and chips aren’t in the kitchen cabinet, then you can’t eat them.

It’s also very important to stay hydrated and drink plenty of water. Health experts recommend that you drink at least eight 8-ounce glasses of water each day, but if you’re outside a lot or exercising, it should be more. Stay healthy!

fasting diet

How to fast safely during pandemic?

  • October 20, 2020

As the festive season begins in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, it brings with it many religious rituals. Fasting is one such ritual. But how safe is it to fast during the pandemic, especially when there is no vaccine yet to protect us? Worry not! There are small and effective steps that you can take to boost your immune system naturally without interrupting your fasting schedule. Listed below are 5 tips on how to fast safely while taking care of your body’s defenses. Also Read – Intermittent fasting is not for everyone: Should you choose this eating plan?

Maintain healthy eating during your eating window

Over the years, eating good quality food has been linked to good health. People who do not follow a good diet are more prone to suffer from immunity deficiencies and thus are more vulnerable to diseases. Include more nutritious foods in your fasting diet. Healthy eating can also help you fight depression which has a direct link with immunity boosting. Specially during this pandemic, one should consider building a strong immunity in whatever way possible.

Fast for better sleep

Sleeping for at least 7 hours is extremely important for an adult’s overall wellbeing. But when you fast, you eat less and, when you eat less, you tend to disturb your body cycle. This body cycle includes your sleeping habit as well. Not giving your body proper sleep can lead to heart disease and neurodegenerative disorders and could also make you more susceptible to viral infections such as the common cold virus. If you usually have trouble in sleeping or you are suffering from insomnia, try making small behaviour changes in your daily life.

Avoid extended fasting

Multi-day fasts may temporarily weaken your immune system, which is not good in the current scenario. The issue with doing extended fasting at this point of time is that you may not be able to ensure or guarantee that you won’t come into contact with someone who is sick while you are fasting. Since fasting may weaken your immunity, your chances of catching the virus gets multiplied.

Include some physical activities in your daily routine while fasting

Not only is it safe to exercise while fasting, regular physical activities reduce the chances of viral and bacterial infections. When you exercise, your body’s immune cells redistribute to various organs. This in a way heightens your ability to fight off diseases.

Drink more water to keep yourself hydrated

Water has various health benefits and the most important is hydration. When you fast, your body tends to become weak. But, if you keep yourself hydrated, it becomes easier for your body to fight against invading germs and viruses. Drinking water is not only important when you are fasting, but it is equally important throughout the year.

Although, doctors asking people not to fast during the pandemic, if you are still planning to do so, then be sure to follow the basic steps mentioned above. Have a happy, safe and healthy Navratri and Durga puja!

Also Read – Intermittent fasting can affect your mind too: Beware of the psychological effects

Published : October 20, 2020 4:24 pm | Updated:October 20, 2020 4:32 pm


Can Supplements Help Fight COVID-19? Here’s What We Know

Can Supplements Help Fight COVID-19? Here’s What We Know

  • October 19, 2020

By Laura Beil

Consumers have long turned to vitamins and herbs to try to protect themselves from disease. This pandemic is no different — especially with headlines that scream “This supplement could save you from coronavirus.


It also helps to have celebrity enthusiasts. When President Donald Trump was diagnosed with COVID-19, his pill arsenal included Vitamin D and zinc. And in an Instagram chat with actress Jennifer Garner in September, infectious diseases expert Anthony Fauci touted vitamins C and D as ways that might generally boost the immune system. “If you’re deficient in vitamin D,” he noted, “that does have an impact on your susceptibility to infection. I would not mind recommending, and I do it myself, taking vitamin D supplements.”

But whether over-the-counter supplements can actually prevent, or even treat, COVID-19, is not clear. Since the disease is so new, researchers haven’t had much time for the kind of large experiments that provide the best answers. Instead, scientists have mostly relied on fresh takes on old data. Some studies have looked at outcomes of patients who routinely take certain supplements — and found some promising hints. But so far there’s little data from the kinds of scientifically rigorous experiments that give doctors confidence when recommending supplements.

Here’s what we know today about three supplements getting plenty of attention around COVID-19.

Vitamin D

What it is: Called “the sunshine vitamin” because the body makes it naturally in the presence of ultraviolet light, Vitamin D is one of the most heavily studied supplements (SN: 1/27/19). Certain foods, including fish and fortified milk products, are also high in the vitamin.

Why it might help: Vitamin D is a hormone building block that helps strengthen the immune system.

How it works for other infections: In 2017, the British Medical Journal published a meta-analysis that suggested a daily vitamin D supplement might help prevent respiratory infections, particularly in people who are deficient in the vitamin.

But one key word here is deficient. That risk is highest during dark winters at high latitudes and among people with more color in their skin (melanin, a pigment that’s higher in darker skin, inhibits the production of vitamin D).

“If you have enough vitamin D in your body, the evidence doesn’t stack up to say that giving you more will make a real difference,” says Susan Lanham-New, head of the Nutritional Sciences Department at the University of Surrey in England.

And taking too much can create new health problems, stressing certain internal organs and leading to a dangerously high calcium buildup in the blood. The recommended daily allowance for adults is 600 to 800 International Units per day, and the upper limit is considered to be 4,000 IUs per day.

What we know about Vitamin D and COVID-19: Few studies have looked directly at whether vitamin D makes a difference in COVID.

In May, in the BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health, Lanham-New and her colleagues published a summary of existing evidence and concluded that there’s only enough to recommend vitamin D to help with COVID-19 prevention for people who are deficient. That paper made inferences from how vitamin D works against other respiratory tract infections and immune health.

More than a dozen studies are now testing vitamin D directly for prevention and treatment, including a large one led by JoAnn Manson, a leading expert on vitamin D. An epidemiologist and preventive medicine physician at Harvard Medical School and Brigham & Women’s Hospital in Boston. That study will analyze if vitamin D can affect the course of a COVID-19 infection. The trial aims to recruit 2,700 people across the United States with newly diagnosed infections, along with their close household contacts.

The goal is to determine whether newly diagnosed people given high doses of vitamin D — 3,200 IU per day — are less likely than people who get a placebo to experience severe symptoms and need hospitalization. “The biological plausibility for a benefit in COVID is compelling,” she says, given the nutrient’s theoretical ability to impede the severe inflammatory reaction that can follow coronavirus infection. “However the evidence is not conclusive at this time.”

Zinc

What it is: Zinc, a mineral found in cells all over the body, is found naturally in certain meats, beans and oysters.

Why it might help: It plays several supportive roles in the immune system, which is why zinc lozenges are always hot sellers in cold and flu season. Zinc also helps with cell division and growth.

How it works for other infections: Studies of using zinc for colds — which are frequently caused by coronaviruses — suggest that using a supplement right after symptoms start might make them go away quicker. That said, a clinical trial from researchers in Finland and the United Kingdom, published in January in BMJ Open did not find any value for zinc lozenges for the treatment of colds. Some researchers have theorized that inconsistencies in data for colds may be explained by varying amounts of zinc released in different lozenges.

What we know about zinc and COVID-19: The mineral is promising enough that it was added to some early studies of hydroxychloroquine, a drug tested early in the pandemic. (Studies have since shown that hydroxychloroquine can’t prevent or treat COVID-19 (SN: 8/2/20).)

In July, researchers from Aachen University in Germany wrote in Frontiers of Immunology that current evidence “strongly suggests great benefits of zinc supplementation” based on looking at similar infections including SARS, another disease caused by a coronavirus. For example, studies suggest that giving zinc reduces the risk for death from a pneumonia infection. The researchers cite evidence that zinc might help prevent the virus from entering the body, and help slow the virus’s replication when it does.

Another review — also based on indirect evidence — published August 1 in Advances in Integrative Medicine also concluded that zinc might be helpful in people who are deficient.

In September, researchers from Hospital Del Marin Barcelona reported that among 249 patients studied, those who survived COVID had higher zinc levels in their plasma (an average of 63.1 mcg/dl) than those who died (43mcg/dl).

Overall, though, the jury is still out, says Suma Thomas, a cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, who in June led a team that reviewed the evidence for popular supplements in the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine. Given what’s already known, zinc could possibly decrease the duration of infection but not the severity of symptoms, she said, particularly among people who are deficient. About a dozen studies are now looking at zinc for COVID treatment, often with other drugs or supplements.

Thomas and her colleagues are comparing symptom severity and future hospitalization in COVID-19 patients who take zinc with and without high doses of vitamin C with those who receive ordinary care without the supplement. Results are expected soon, she says.

Vitamin C

What it is: Also called L-ascorbic acid, vitamin C has a long list of roles in the body. It’s found naturally in fruits and vegetables, especially citrus, peppers and tomatoes.

Why it might help: It’s a potent antioxidant that’s important for a healthy immune system and preventing inflammation.

How it works for other infections: Thomas cautions that the data on vitamin C are often contradictory. One review from Chinese researchers, published in February in the Journal of Medical Virology, looked at what is already known about vitamin C and other supplements that might have a role in COVID-19 treatment. Among other encouraging signs, human studies find a lower incidence of pneumonia among people taking vitamin C, “suggesting that vitamin C might prevent the susceptibility to lower respiratory tract infections under certain conditions.”

But for preventing colds, a 2013 Cochrane review of 29 studies didn’t support the idea that vitamin C supplements could help in the general population. However, the authors wrote, given that vitamin C is cheap and safe, “it may be worthwhile for common cold patients to test on an individual basis whether therapeutic vitamin C is beneficial.”

What we know about Vitamin C and COVID-19: About a dozen studies are under way or planned to examine whether vitamin C added to coronavirus treatment helps with symptoms or survival, including Thomas’ study at the Cleveland Clinic.

In a review published online in July in Nutrition, researchers from KU Leuven in Belgium concluded that the vitamin may help prevent infection and tamp down the dangerous inflammatory reaction that can cause severe symptoms, based on what is known about how the nutrient works in the body.

Melissa Badowski, a pharmacist who specializes in viral infections at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy and colleague Sarah Michienzi published an extensive look at all supplements that might be useful in the coronavirus epidemic. There’s still not enough evidence to know whether they are helpful, the pair concluded in July in Drugs in Context. “It’s not really clear if it’s going to benefit patients,” Badowski says.

And while supplements are generally safe, she adds that nothing is risk free. The best way to avoid infection, she says, is still to follow the advice of epidemiologists and public health experts: “Wash your hands, wear a mask, stay six feet apart.”

This story was originally published by Science News, a nonprofit independent news organization.

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Alternative methods for Students to stay active during Pandemic – THE EXPONENT

Alternative methods for Students to stay active during Pandemic – THE EXPONENT

  • October 17, 2020

As the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic continues to linger, the students of Baldwin Wallace have been forced to adjust to the new health guidelines placed in the Lou Higgins Rec Center weight room.

There are many open-access fitness opportunities on campus, but after the 35-person capacity limit was placed in the gym at the beginning the school year, students and staff are facing the challenge of participating in physical activity.

Physical activity helps to boost the immune system, said Dr. Amy Jo Sutterluety, Professor of the School of Health, Physical Education and Sport Sciences and member of the Exercise is Medicine on-campus program committee, and it is important to utilize as the flu season approaches.

“Being active during Covid-19 definitely is important for our immune system,” she said. “We know that physical activity of moderate levels—brisk walking, using the treadmill, using the elliptical—releases certain immune system defense mechanisms that can assist with our body’s ability to fight off the flu or Covid-19.”

As a member of the Exercise is Medicine on Campus (EIM-OC) program, she aims to engage in the promotion of physical activity as a vital sign of health. In this program, faculty, staff and students work together to improve the health and well-being of the BW community.

Remaining physically active can also be an effective treatment strategy for symptoms of both depression and anxiety and is very useful and important as it relates to the obstacles faced during Covid-19.

“Physical activity can assist with people’s moods,” said Dr. Sutterluety. “Many people are currently dealing with a lot of mental health issues, such as a change of lifestyle and our ability to get out and do the things that most of us have been used to throughout our lives.”

The BW Health Promotion office hosted the Virtual Week of Wellfest last week, Sept 21-25. Each day of the virtual wellness week held different themes to promote community wellness such as healthy eating, at-home movement activities, stress and anxiety management, and many more to assist with the concern of mental health this semester.

In addition to these virtual resources for wellness and mental health promotion, the BW Campus Rec encourages students to participate in BW Nature RX, which is an outdoor adventure campus initiative to get people moving outside and active, said Caroline Kessler, Coordinator of the BW Campus Recreation Services. The outdoor program meets every Wednesday from 3:30-5 pm at Coe Lake.

“Being in nature is proven to help your mental state,” said Kessler. “It does help with stress levels… being out in nature whether you’re taking a walk or hammocking. We have a lot of Outdoor Adventure programming like BW Nature RX that helps people stay active even with the Covid guidelines.”

Accommodating to those who prefer at-home physical activity, the department also provides the BW community with virtual fitness classes, said Kessler. The public YouTube channel, BW Rec Sports, includes remote fitness videos such as Yoga, Zumba, and Conditioning exercises. Although the gym activity has been fairly steady, Kessler said the students and staff of the weight room have been thoroughly following health protocols and cleaning procedures for equipment.

The Campus Rec staff asks everyone who is working out that they clean the equipment they use after they work out, as they have added quite a few more spray bottles inside. Additionally, they have also added extra weight room staff to clean with a stronger disinfectant consistently throughout the whole day to ensure proper sanitation.

They have implemented a daily shutdown in the weight room from 2-3 pm, she said, in which the staff uses a backpack disinfectant sprayer to spray down all equipment and allow it to sit to effectively kill bacteria.

“We’re really just making sure that we’re keeping it consistent and working with our students and staff to enforce the rules during this time,” said Kessler.

According to Kessler, the Campus Rec is continuing to work with the outdoor adventure club to keep students active while following the social distancing guidelines throughout the semester.

Coronavirus reinfections are real but also very, very rare. Here's what you should know

Coronavirus reinfections are real but also very, very rare. Here’s what you should know

  • October 14, 2020
By Apoorva Mandavilli


Reports of reinfection with the coronavirus evoke a nightmarish future: Repeat bouts of illness, impotent vaccines, unrelenting lockdowns — a pandemic without an end.

A case study published Monday, about a 25-year-old man in Nevada, has stoked those fears anew. The man, who was not named, became sicker the second time that he was infected with the virus, a pattern the immune system is supposed to prevent.

But these cases make the news precisely because they are rare, experts said: More than 38 million people worldwide have been infected with the coronavirus, and as of Monday, fewer than five of those cases have been confirmed by scientists to be reinfections.

“That’s tiny — it’s like a microliter-sized drop in the bucket, compared to the number of cases that have happened all over the world,” said Angela Rasmussen, a virologist at Columbia University in New York.

In most cases, a second bout with the virus produced milder symptoms or none at all. But for at least three people, including one patient in Ecuador, the illness was more severe the second time around than during the first infection. An 89-year-old woman in the Netherlands died during her second illness.

Rare as these cases may be, they do indicate that reinfection is possible, said Akiko Iwasaki, an immunologist at Yale University, who wrote a commentary accompanying the Nevada case study, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

“It’s important to note that there are people who do get reinfected, and in some of those cases you get worse disease,” Iwasaki said. “You still need to keep wearing masks and practice social distancing even if you have recovered once from this infection.”

We asked experts what is known about reinfections with the coronavirus, and what the phenomenon means for vaccinations and the course of the pandemic.

Reinfection with the coronavirus is an unusual event.

First, the good news: Reinfection seems to be vanishingly rare.

Since the first confirmed case of reinfection, reported in Hong Kong on Aug. 24, there have been three published cases; reports of another 20 await scientific review.

But it is impossible to know exactly how widespread the phenomenon is. To confirm a case of reinfection, scientists must look for significant differences in the genes of the two coronaviruses causing both illnesses.

In the United States, where testing was a rare resource much of this year, many people were not tested unless they were sick enough to be hospitalized. Even then, their samples were usually not preserved for genetic analysis, making it impossible to confirm suspected reinfections.

A vast majority of people who do get reinfected may go undetected. For example, the man in Hong Kong had no symptoms the second time, and his infection was discovered only because of routine screening at the airport.

“There are a lot of people that are going to also have been exposed that aren’t having symptoms, that we’re never going to hear about,” said Marion Pepper, an immunologist at the University of Washington in Seattle.

People whose second infections are more severe are more likely to be identified, because they return to the hospital. But those are likely to be even rarer, experts said.

“If this was a very common event, we would have seen thousands of cases,” Iwasaki said.

In most people, the immune system works as expected.

Reinfections can occur for any number of reasons: because the initial infection was too mild to produce an immune response, for example, or because the immune system was compromised by other health conditions. On occasion, a patient may be exposed to a large amount of virus that seeded an infection before the immune response could respond.

This variability is entirely expected, experts said, and has been observed in patients with diseases like measles and malaria.

“You’ll never have the distribution of anything with millions of people where you don’t have some very severe rare cases happening at the fringe,” said Dr. Michael Mina, a pediatric immunologist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

At least two of the reinfected patients in Europe had compromised immune systems, for example, and the 89-year-old woman who died was receiving chemotherapy. In other reinfected patients, genetic factors or the lack of certain previous immune exposures may have blunted the body’s ability to fight off a second attack.

“There are some people who just don’t develop good immune responses to certain pathogens,” said Florian Krammer, an immunologist at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “What is causing that? We’re not sure, but it’s rare, usually.”

In a vast majority of known infected patients, experts said, the immune system functions as it should against other pathogens.

“There are a lot of different infections where you can get reexposed to the virus, and we would probably not know because you don’t have symptoms,” Pepper said. “And that might be an important part of boosting immunity.”

When the body is exposed to an unfamiliar virus, it is normal first to develop some immunity and then to increase that response with each additional exposure. This phenomenon is well known among children, but it is less often seen in adults because they rarely encounter new viruses, Mina said.

“I think it’s important to recognize that reinfections are literally embedded in the evolution of our immune system,” he added. “We sometimes lose track of that with so many people talking about this who really haven’t studied the immune system.”

A resurgence of symptoms doesn’t prove reinfection.

For every confirmed case of reinfection, there are dozens of anecdotal reports of infected people who were sick and seemingly recovered but then became ill again weeks to months later.

Usually there are crucial data missing in those cases, like a confirmed lab diagnosis, or a virus sample that can be sequenced.

“The question is always, Is it a real reinfection?” Krammer said. “It’s very often very challenging to kind of get that kind of data.”

A vast majority of these cases are unlikely to be true infections. More likely, these are people experiencing a resurgence of symptoms connected to the original infection. The virus may set off an inflammatory response that can flare up even weeks later and cause symptoms like fatigue and heart problems. In rare cases, some patients may develop a chronic low-grade infection with the virus that never quite goes away.

“Even with viruses that can cause acute infections, like flu,” Krammer said, “you can have persistent infections if your immune system is sufficiently compromised.”

Although these are not real reinfections, they are still worrying if they lead to renewed illness or hospitalization months after the initial infection, Rasmussen said. “If there’s recrudescence happening frequently, and people are getting severely ill the second time around, that’s potentially its own problem,” she said.

People with a second bout may pass the virus to others.

Reinfected people without symptoms may still transmit the virus to others. The patient in Hong Kong, for example, was isolated in a hospital even though he had no symptoms. But his viral load was high enough that he could have passed the virus to others.

“Obviously, that person wasn’t ill, so it bodes well for him, but it doesn’t bode well for the community,” Pepper said.

But to be sure of infectiousness, researchers may need to look for live virus. South Korean researchers investigated hundreds of reports of reinfection and were able to rule them out as real cases after failing to grow infectious virus from the samples.

Similar procedures would be needed to rule out the possibility of transmission in each patient, Rasmussen said, adding, “I think that’s the only way you’d be able to get to the bottom of that.”

Vaccines may be crucial to preventing reinfections.

Reports of reinfection have raised concerns about whether vaccines for the coronavirus will be effective and help communities achieve population immunity. The worry is that the immunity produced by vaccines will not be sufficient in preventing reinfections with the virus.

In reality, experts said, vaccines have a better chance at generating robust immunity than does natural infection with the virus.

For example, the coronavirus is particularly adept at dodging the body’s early immune alarms, buying valuable time to seed an infection. In some people, this lag eventually triggers a cascading immune overreaction that can be more harmful than the infection itself.

Vaccines are intended to unfurl an immune response without interference from the virus, and thus may avoid this inflammatory sequence. Vaccines can also be manipulated to enhance immune memory, in that way producing more lasting, more protective responses.

Vaccine trials are designed to look for an absence of disease, rather than of infection, and it’s unclear whether vaccines can suppress virus levels enough to prevent transmission to others.

Still, vaccine-induced immunity should perform better than natural immunity, Rasmussen said, adding, “I’m optimistic.”

Main Squeeze Juice Co. Has Donated 10,000 Wellness Shots, Juices and Smoothies to Frontline Workers During Pandemic

Main Squeeze Juice Co. Has Donated 10,000 Wellness Shots, Juices and Smoothies to Frontline Workers During Pandemic

  • October 12, 2020

Main Squeeze Juice Co. Has Donated 10,000 Wellness Shots, Juices and Smoothies to Frontline Workers During Pandemic

Main Squeeze Juice Co. Has Donated 10,000 Wellness Shots, Juices and Smoothies to Frontline Workers During PandemicNew Orleans, LA  (Restaurant News Release)  In an effort to boost healthcare workers’ physical and cognitive health during COVID-19, Main Squeeze Juice Co., the New Orleans-based juice and smoothie franchise whose ownership group includes New Orleans Saints punter Thomas Morstead and former Saints receiver Marques Colston, has delivered 10,000 wellness shots, smoothies and juices to those on the frontlines.

The initiative kicked off during the onset of the coronavirus pandemic in March, and has since made deliveries to various medical and health facilities throughout various parts of Louisiana, including New Orleans, Baton Rouge and Shreveport. A delivery was also made to a local hospital in Houston, Texas.

“In hospitals and clinics around the country, frontline health workers are spending countless hours combatting the disease in our communities and assisting those in need. They are taking on significant personal risk, and maintaining their health is of paramount importance, as is maintaining high energy levels and a clear mind,” said Main Squeeze founder and CEO Thomas Nieto. “This is the very least we can do to show our appreciation and thank them for the hard work they do every day. We wouldn’t be here without them.”

Most of the products that were delivered over the past six months included Main Squeeze’s Cure shots, which are known to awaken one’s immune system due to the high content of vitamin C and antioxidants, as well as give individuals a boost of energy from a cayenne pepper kick. According to Nieto, the shot is “intense” but the benefits are worth it.

Other Main Squeeze menu items – including Espresso shots, and some of the franchise’s chef-designed, dietitian-inspired cold-pressed juices and superfood smoothies – have also been delivered as part of the initiative.

“We are just trying to provide some good nutrition for the doctors, nurses, healthcare staff at the hospitals and it’s just our way of adding in a little support,” said Morstead, who personally delivered the first shipment to a New Orleans medical center back in March. “Obviously you’re seeing stories of this all over. People are chipping in all sorts of different ways around the country and around the world. We’re just trying to do our little part.”

Colston added, “Our shots do have a positive impact on your immune system. So with Main Squeeze being a community partner, we reached out to these facilities and really just wanted to do our part to help support the frontline workers that are literally putting their lives on the line every day. We felt the need to give them something that would help them boost their immune system from a preventative standpoint and, if nothing else, a morale boost to let them know we appreciate what they’re doing.”

About Main Squeeze Juice Co.

Founded in 2016 and franchising since August of 2017, Main Squeeze Juice Co. is a New Orleans, Louisiana-based juice and smoothie bar franchise whose nutritionist-designed, superfood-inspired menu seeks to change the lives of those looking for a healthier and more convenient way of fulfilling their nutritional goals. Today, there are 13 locations open and operating throughout Louisiana and Texas, with more than 60 additional franchisee- and corporate-owned stores in various stages of development across the Southeast. For more information, visit www.mainsqueezejuiceco.com.

Contact:
Michael Misetic
Franchise Elevator PR
847-239-8171
mmistic@franchiseelevator.com

Excessive use of hand-sanitisers may boost antimicrobial resistance, warns AIIMS

Excessive use of hand-sanitisers may boost antimicrobial resistance, warns AIIMS

  • October 11, 2020
Increased usage of antibiotics during Covid-19 can lead to more antimicrobial resistance, health experts of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences said, adding that the widespread use of hand-sanitisers and antimicrobial soaps can further worsen the situation.

Antimicrobial resistance is the ability of a pathogenic microbe to develop a resistance to the effects of an antimicrobial medication. It has been estimated that by 2050, about 10 million human lives could be at risk every year if drug resistance is not managed.

Various aspects of antimicrobial resistance were discussed in a two-day international webinar on antibiotic resistance jointly organised by All India Institute of Medical Sciences and American Society for Microbiology.

The webinar was organised by Dr Rama Chaudhry, Professor and Head of AIIMS’s Department of Microbiology, International Ambassador of American Society for Microbiology to India and her team Dr Bimal Kumar Das, Dr Sarita Mohapatra, Dr Gagandeep Singh, Dr Hitender Gautam and Dr Nishant Verma.

In the webinar, the health experts talked about how the Covid-19 pandemic has jolted the entire world and significantly impacted the focus of health facilities towards antimicrobial resistance.

“It has been estimated that as we reach the year 2050, about 10 million human lives could be at risk every year if we do not manage the increasing drug resistance. The widespread use of hand sanitisers and antimicrobial soaps which has especially increased multifold during the Covid-19 pandemic can worsen the situation,” the experts said.

They went on to say that antibiotic-resistant organisms have become rigidly established in our environment with many infections failing to respond to currently available antimicrobials. The antimicrobial resistance has outpaced the development of newer antimicrobials.

The health experts added that there is an urgent need to explore the alternative therapies. “The importance of these non-conventional and alternative therapeutic approaches like bacteriophages, endolysins, nanoparticles, probiotics and antimicrobial peptides are needed.”

Antimicrobial resistance is one of the biggest challenges of modern medicine. It mounts problems beyond the geographical as well as species barriers and can transmit from animals to humans.

The webinar was inaugurated by the Guest of Honour and AIIMS Director Randeep Guleria, and Chief Guest Dr Sujeet Kumar Singh, Director of National Centre for Disease Control. It also covered a vast range of topics from esteemed speakers from Centre for Disease Control, World Health Organisation, Indian Council of Medical Research, PGIMER Chandigarh, and IIT Roorkee.

Various aspects of antimicrobial resistance were discussed including surveillance, one health approach, role of whole genome sequencing, including alternative therapies. Both the days concluded with very interesting and informative panel discussions moderated by Dr Pallab Ray from PGIMER, Chandigarh and Dr Rama Chaudhry from AIIMS.

vitamin C, vitamin C immunity, indianexpress.com, monsoon, pandemic, vitamin C benefits,

Why you need vitamin C for immunity this season

  • October 9, 2020
By: Lifestyle Desk | New Delhi |

October 9, 2020 10:00:30 am





vitamin C, vitamin C immunity, indianexpress.com, monsoon, pandemic, vitamin C benefits, Up your vitamin C intake this monsoon. (Source: Getty Images/Thinkstock)

The current health crisis along with changing seasons makes is imperative that we focus on our diets and fitness. To keep healthy, one needs to exercise regularly, sleep well, drink adequate water and have a diet which is rich in all nutrients and also powerful antioxidants, especially vitamin C, says Sushant Raoranem, co-founder-director, Adroit Biomed Pvt Ltd.

A recent study by Bengaluru’s Indian Institute of Science (IISC) suggests that vitamin C encumbers and kills Mycobacterium smegmatis, a non-pathogenic bacterium. In addition to health problems, vitamin C also helps combat any fungal infections of the skin and nails. It is prudent to consume, therefore, at least 500mg of vitamin C on a day-to-day basis as it helps in advancing immunity, and plummeting the brutality and duration of common cold, flu and infections from viruses, he advises.

Here are some benefits of vitamin C which help us keep a check on our health

Reduces the risk of chronic diseases

Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that can strengthen your body’s natural defences. Antioxidants are molecules that boost the immune system by protecting cells from harmful molecules called free radicals. When these free radicals gather, they can endorse a state known as oxidative stress, which has been linked to many chronic diseases. Studies show that consuming more vitamin C can increase your blood antioxidant levels by up to 30 per cent, which helps the body’s natural fortifications fight inflammation.

ALSO READ | Diet Diary: How much Vitamin C is too much?

Restoring Immunity

One of the main reasons people take vitamin C supplements is to boost or restore their immunity.

* It helps encourage the production of white blood cells known as lymphocytes and phagocytes, which help protect the body against infections.

* Vitamin C helps white blood cells function more efficiently while shielding them from damage by potentially harmful molecules, such as free radicals.

* Studies have also shown that vitamin C may shorten healing time for wounds.

Low vitamin C levels have been linked to poor health outcomes. People who have pneumonia tend to have lower vitamin C levels, and vitamin C supplementations have been shown to curtail the recovery time.

Vitamin C for your skin

As far as your skin is concerned, vitamin C is a potent antioxidant that can neutralise free radicals. It is an essential part of the skin’s defense mechanism. It’s vigorously transported to the skin, where it acts as an antioxidant and helps reinforce the skin’s barrier. But, its skin-saving benefits aren’t limited to its antioxidant properties. It has plenty of other skin-healing properties that make it worthy of a permanent place in your medicine cabinet. For one, it’s highly acidic, when used topically and the skin is triggered to heal itself by accelerating the production of collagen and elastin.

One of the easiest ways of increasing your immunity against infections is enhancing vitamin C intake. Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin that must be obtained from the diet or supplements. It has been allied to many remarkable health benefits, such as boosting antioxidant levels, lowering blood pressure, boosting immunity, protecting skin from infections and many more. “Vitamin C supplements are a great and simple way to boost one’s immunity. It is recommended to use these, should there be a deficit of this antioxidant in your diet,” said Raoranem.

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No evidence that immunity boosting ‘kadha’ damages liver: AYUSH ministry – more lifestyle

  • October 7, 2020

New Delhi, Oct 6 (PTI) The AYUSH ministry on Tuesday dismissed claims that prolonged consumption of ‘kadha’, recommended as a preventive health measure for boosting immunity amid the COVID-19 pandemic, damages the liver, saying it is a “wrong notion” as ingredients used for preparing it are used in cooking at home. Speaking at a press briefing, secretary, AYUSH Ministry, Vaidya Rajesh Kotecha, said ingredients like cinnamon, basil and black pepper used for preparing the ‘kadha’ have a positive effect on the respiratory system. The Ministry of AYUSH had in March issued some self-care guidelines as preventive health measures for boosting immunity with special reference to respiratory health amidst the coronavirus outbreak.

As part of the guidelines, among other things, it recommended drinking herbal tea or ‘kadha’ (decoction) made from basil, cinnamon, black pepper, dry ginger, and raisins once or twice a day. “There is no evidence that it (kadha) damages the liver. It is a wrong notion because the ingredients that go into the ‘kadha’ are used as masala in cooking at home,” Kotecha said. He, however, added that studies are ongoing to determine how effective these ingredients can be in the battle against COVID-19. On the protocol for the clinical management of COVID-19, which was released earlier in the day by Union Health Minister Harsh Vardhan, Kotecha said it is to be used in addition to following COVID-appropriate behaviour and standard treatment protocol and is not a “replacement” for the same.

Kotecha mentioned that the protocol has been brought out considering the ayurveda literature and clinical experience, empirical evidences and biological plausibility and also emerging trends of ongoing clinical studies. The ‘National Clinical Management Protocol based on Ayurveda and Yoga for Management of COVID-19’ lists dietary measures, yoga and ayurvedic herbs and formulations such as Ashwagandha and AYUSH-64 for the prevention of coronavirus infection and treatment of mild and asymptomatic cases. The AYUSH ministry, in the protocol document, pointed out that the current understanding indicates a good immune system is vital for the prevention of coronavirus infection and to safeguard one from disease progression.

The protocol suggests use of medicines such as Ashwagandha, Guduchi Ghana Vati or Chyawanaprasha as prophylactic care for high-risk population and primary contacts of patients. It recommends consumption of Guduchi Ghana Vati, Guduchi and Pippali or AYUSH 64 for asymptomatic COVID-19 patients for prevention of disease progression to symptomatic and severe forms and to improve recovery rate. Guduchi and Pippali, and AYUSH 64 tablets can be given to mild coronavirus infected patients, it said. The protocol also mentions the dose of these medicines to be taken. The guidelines stated that in addition to these medicines, general and dietary measures have to be followed.

Individuals with moderate to severe coronavirus infection may make an informed choice of treatment option and all severe cases will be referred, the protocol said. Physicians have to decide useful formulations from the list or substitutable classical medicines based upon their clinical judgement, suitability, availability and regional preferences. The dose may be adjusted based upon the patient’s age, weight, and condition of the disease, the ministry said. The document also listed Ashwagandha, Chyawanprasha or Rasayana Churna for post-COVID-19 management in order to prevent lung complications like fibrosis, fatigue and mental health. Further, to improve respiratory and cardiac efficiency, to reduce stress and anxiety and enhance immunity, the ministry has listed Yoga Protocol for Primary Prevention of COVID- 19.

The document also mentions Yoga Protocol for Post COVID-19 care (including care for COVID-19 patients) in order to improve pulmonary function and lung capacity, reduce stress and anxiety and improve muco-ciliary clearance. “This protocol and its annexure are approved by the Chairman, Interdisciplinary Committee for inclusion of Ayurveda and Yoga in the management of mild COVID-19 and approved by the empowered committee of the Interdisciplinary AYUSH Research and Development Taskforce on COVID-19, both constituted by the Ministry of AYUSH,” the document said. The ministry also recommended gargling with warm water with a pinch of turmeric and salt, nasal instillation/application of medicated oil (Anu taila or Shadbindu taila), plain oil or cow’s ghee once or twice a day, especially before going out and after coming back home, steam inhalation with carrom seeds, mint or eucalyptus oil once a day, moderate physical exercises and following yoga protocol as general measures. Dietary measures include use of warm water or boiled with herbs like ginger, coriander, basil or cumin seeds etc., for drinking purpose, drinking golden milk (half teaspoon turmeric powder in 150 ml hot milk) once at night (avoid in case of indigestion) and taking Ayush Kadha or Kwath (hot infusion or decoction) once a day.

(This story has been published from a wire agency feed without modifications to the text. Only the headline has been changed.)

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