BCG vaccine is safe, does not increase Covid risk: Study

BCG vaccine is safe, does not increase Covid risk: Study

  • August 7, 2020

London: The Bacille Calmette-Guerin or BCG vaccine, originally made against tuberculosis, has a general stimulating effect on the immune system and is therefore effective against Covid-19, say researchers.

The study, published in the journal Cell Reports Medicine, compared groups of volunteers who have received a BCG vaccine in the past five years (before the corona pandemic), showing that the vaccine is safe and possibly influences Covid-19 symptoms.

“It is very important to confirm that someone who has been vaccinated with BCG does not experience any increased symptoms during the Covid-19 pandemic,” said study researcher Mihai Netea from Radboud University in the Netherlands.

The BCG vaccine is the most widely received vaccine in the world. Originally intended to treat tuberculosis, it later became apparent that it provides a long-lasting, general boost to the innate immune system.

The vaccine was therefore also effective against other conditions.

In the current study, the research team conducted research into these effects referred to as “trained immunity”.

The ‘300BCG’ study is a result of his work, in which a group of healthy volunteers received the BCG vaccine and could thus be compared to a group of healthy volunteers who did not.

Most volunteers received the vaccine between April 2017 and June 2018.

The purpose of that study was to determine the difference in the immune response, but now that the corona pandemic is present, the same subjects were questioned to see if there is an effect of the vaccine on the symptoms attributable to infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

It’s safe, perhaps a positive effect, the study showed.

What the comparison between the groups shows is that those who received the vaccine did not have more symptoms, did not get sick more often or become more seriously ill, during the first wave of the Covid-19 pandemic in the Netherlands.

The data show also a cautiously positive picture, with a lower number of sick people in the period March-May 2020 among the BCG-vaccinated group, and also a lower incidence of extreme fatigue among the vaccinated individuals.

The researchers underline that this was to be expected given the well-known effects of the BCG vaccine on healthy volunteers.

“Although we see less sickness in the people who have had the BCG vaccination, only the ongoing prospective BCG vaccination studies can determine whether this vaccination can help against Covid-19,” Netea said.

Recently, another study published in the journal Science Advances, revealed that BCG vaccination can be effective in the fight against Covid-19.

(Inputs From IANS)

Pharmavite study finds immune health nutrient intakes below estimated average requirement

Pharmavite study finds immune health nutrient intakes below estimated average requirement

  • August 5, 2020

A study recently published in Nutrients found that there may be an inadequate intake of immune health-related nutrients. The study, conducted by Pharmavite, presents a new analysis of micronutrient usual intake estimates based on data from the 2005–2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), which contains representative data on 26,283 adults over the age of 19. Researchers found that 45% of the U.S. population was below the estimated average requirement (EAR) for vitamin A, 46% was below the EAR for vitamin C, 95% was below the EAR for vitamin D, 84% was below the EAR for vitamin E, and 15% was below the EAR for zinc. These deficiencies either remained the same or increased when compared to the 2003-2007 NHANES.

“A diet rich in whole foods, including colorful fruits and vegetables, lean proteins, whole grains, nuts, seeds, legumes, low-fat dairy and seafood can provide the essential nutrients needed to meet daily requirements. However, research shows Americans are not eating the foods necessary to meet their needs for key nutrients, which has contributed to nutrient gaps that have been reported for almost 15 years,” said Susan Hazels Mitmesser, PhD, vice president, science and technology at Pharmavite (West Hills, CA). “Findings from our recent analysis show substantial shortfalls in nutrients that support immune health (vitamins A, C, D, E) and some (vitamins C, D, and zinc) are, in fact, higher than previously reported.”

The authors of the study determined that subjects who consumed food plus dietary supplements had a lower prevalence of nutrient inadequacies, compared to food alone. For example, the percentage of the population below the EAR who consumed both food and dietary supplements was 35% for vitamin A, 33% for vitamin C, 65% for vitamin D, 60% for vitamin E, and 11% for zinc, compared to food alone which was 45%, 46%, 95%, 84%, and 15%, respectively.

Along with a healthy diet, multivitamin/mineral supplements, especially those that offer 100% of the recommended daily allowance, may help fill nutrient gaps for essential nutrients, says the study, but may fall short of optimal levels for certain nutrients such as vitamin D and C. For example, the RDA for vitamin D is 600-800 IU, but this is limited to support bone health. Therefore, the Endocrine Society recommends 1500-2000 IU to maintain a minimum serum 25(OH)D concentration of 30 ng/mL, and the authors of the study state that adults over the age of 19 may require doses as high as 10,000 IU per day to correct, treat, or prevent vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin C has an RDA of 75-90 mg/day, but the optimal dose, say the researchers, is at least 200 mg/day to reach 60 μmol/L for optimal cell and tissue levels and to reduce the duration of the common cold. Additional supplementation may therefore be required to meet optimal levels for these and other nutrients. It’s clear that supporting immune health requires a more balanced and long-term approach than the acute support consumers typically seek.

“The current pandemic has caused a focus on overall health; consumers are now showing more of an interest in nutrition and dietary supplements as a way of supporting their immune system. The key immune health nutrients, vitamins A, C, D, E and zinc, must be consumed daily through food or supplements, and each nutrient plays a key role in both the innate and adaptive immune response,” explains Mitmesser. “For dietary supplements, consumers should focus less on ‘boosting’ their immune system and more on establishing adequate levels all year long of nutrients that support both the innate and adaptive immune response.”

Reference

  1. Reider CA et al. “Inadequacy of immune health nutrients: Intakes in US adults, the 2005–2016 NHANES.” Nutrients, vol. 12, no. 6 (2020): 1735
Bonn Group launches ''immunity-boosting'' herb and seeds bread

Patients with neuromuscular disease at high risk of severe COVID-19: Study

  • August 4, 2020
New York, Aug 4 (PTI) COVID-19 can bring on neuromuscular complications in patients who previously had none, and exacerbate symptoms in those with preexisting conditions on therapies to stimulate the immune system, according to a new research.

The review of studies, published in the RRNMF Neuromuscular Journal, assessed research mentioning COVID-19 and neuromuscular conditions, published since the beginning of the pandemic through June 18, 2020 — a total of 547 publications.

It analysed cases of serious neuromuscular complications and outcomes associated with the viral infection, and management considerations for patients on therapies to boost their immune system function during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Although neuromuscular complications of COVID-19 have not received as much publicity as stroke complications, they are being increasingly reported,” said Gil I Wolfe, a co-author of the study from the University of Buffalo in the US.

“Guillain-Barre syndrome, a severe life-threatening paralysing neuropathy that is a complication of many viral infections, has now been seen in COVID-19 patients in many countries, including the US,” Wolfe said.

According to the scientists, since the pandemic hit, 27 cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) stemming from the virus have been reported worldwide, with 44 per cent of the patients needing ventilation support.

No fatalities were reported among these patients, and the scientists said 16 of them, or 59 per cent, demonstrated clinical improvement, or achieved full, or near full recovery.

But they said nine of the 27 patients, or 33.3 percent, did not show significant improvement, or had a worsening clinical status.

The research noted that of the 16 patients who improved, 14 were treated with intravenous antibodies.

“While we consider GBS a treatable neuropathy with slow recovery over time, it does appear that many of the COVID-19 patients are following a more refractory course,” Wolfe said.

“Time will tell how they do, since the recovery phase can last a year or two,” he added.

The scientists also noted that two other neuromuscular disorders, myopathy and hyperCKemia, were reported complications of COVID-19 in the reviewed literature.

Myopathy, they explained is when the patients” muscle fibers do not function properly, resulting in weakness, cramps, stiffness, and spasms.

In one of the studies the researchers assessed of 214 COVID-19 patients in Wuhan, China, they found that 10.7 percent of the patients showed evidence of hyperCKemia — skeletal muscle injury, defined as muscle pain, along with high levels of the molecule creatine kinase.

Of the 88 patients with severe infection, the incidence of skeletal muscle injury increased to 19.3 percent, compared to just 4.8 percent in the 126 patients with mild infections, the study noted.

According to the researchers, patients with pre-existing neuromuscular disorders such as myasthenia gravis (MG) tend to be more vulnerable to infections like COVID-19, and the infection often exacerbated their conditions.

They added that immunotherapy treatments place these patients at greater risk of infection.

The University of Buffalo scientists cautioned that patients on immunotherapy and those with respiratory dysfunction secondary to their neuromuscular disease should be considered high risk for severe COVID -19 infection and complications.

They said patients with neuropathy and myopathy should be encouraged to notify their healthcare provider immediately if there are signs suspicious for COVID -19 infection.

“Both of these complications can prolong the amount of time patients require mechanical ventilator assistance,” Wolfe said. PTI VIS
VIS



Disclaimer :- This story has not been edited by Outlook staff and is auto-generated from news agency feeds. Source: PTI


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Can weightlifting keep you from getting sick? Immunity study explains

Can weightlifting keep you from getting sick? Immunity study explains

  • August 1, 2020

When the immune system is battling an invader like cancer or a virus over long stretches of time, it can get tired. In a recent study, researchers discovered what could help stave off this “immune exhaustion.”

According to research conducted in mice, skeletal muscle can keep the immune system from running out of steam when fighting chronic illnesses. That’s because muscles can shelter certain types of T-cells and replenish immune system ranks when they become fatigued.

Jingxia Wu is the study’s first author and a researcher at the German Cancer Research Center. She explains that this sheltering helps the immune system when it’s been continuously fighting a virus over a long period of time.

“If the T-cells, which actively fight the infection, lose their full functionality through continuous stimulation, the precursor cells can migrate from the muscles and develop into functional T-cells,” Wu says.

If the findings are found in humans, not just mice, that could mean weightlifting and building muscle keeps people’s immune system awake, alive, and alert too.

The study was published June 12 in the journal Science Advances.

The link between muscles and immunity — When people become sick with chronic viral infections or cancers, they often lose weight and muscle mass, experiencing a medical phenomenon known as cachexia.

Meanwhile, these populations can also lose T-cells, one of the major players involved in the adaptive immune system. T-cells also become fatigued when fighting these bodily invaders over time.

Until now, researchers haven’t fully understood if and how these separate phenomena — muscle mass and T-cell exhaustion — were linked.

“It is known that T-cells are involved in the loss of skeletal muscle mass,” co-author Guoliang Cui explains. “But whether and how, in turn, skeletal muscles influence the function of the T-cells is still unclear.”

To answer this puzzling question, scientists rounded up a group of mice and infected them with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). This model is commonly used to study acute and chronic infections in mice.

The researchers then analyzed the gene expression in the skeletal muscles of the mice. They found that during chronic infections, the mice’s muscle cells release an increased amount of interleukin-15. This cytokine signals a group of T-cells (called CD8+) to settle in the skeletal muscles.

Hidden away, these T-cells are sheltered from chronic inflammation throughout the body. Then, when other T-cells become exhausted, these muscle T-cell pockets replenish T-cell pools. This helps the mice sustain better long-term antiviral immunity.

Ultimately, the researchers write, this study reveals a “mechanistic link between these two seemingly isolated events” — T-cell exhaustion and muscle mass.

In a global pandemic that makes immune system function more crucial than ever, these findings hint at a possible way to keep immunity strong: weightlifting.

However, since these findings weren’t conducted in people, we don’t know whether muscles play the same cheerleader role to the human immune system.

Even though we’re waiting for human experiments to confirm the findings, it is still worth picking up a kettlebell. Strength training has a long list of benefits — on top of potentially boosting the immune system. It strengthens the nervous system, prevents bone loss, and increases flexibility as people age.

LONGEVITY HACKS is a regular series from Inverse on the science-backed strategies to live better, healthier, and longer without medicine.

HOW THIS AFFECTS LONGEVITY — Researchers discover that skeletal muscle can replenish T-cell pools and keep the immune system from becoming exhausted. At least in mice.

WHY IT’S A HACK — Unlike a lot of the immune “boosters” sold online, exercise works — when it comes to supporting optimal immune function.

SCIENCE IN ACTION — The study suggests on top of promoting a healthier brain and bones, strength training keeps the immune system from becoming exhausted. Burn baby, burn.

HACK SCORE OUT OF 10 — 🏋🏽‍♀️🏋🏽‍♀️🏋🏽‍♀️🏋🏽‍♀️🏋🏽‍♀️🏋🏽‍♀️(6/10 squat presses)

Abstract: CD8+ T cells become functionally impaired or “exhausted” in chronic infections, accompanied by unwanted body weight reduction and muscle mass loss. Whether muscle regulates T cell exhaustion remains incompletely understood. We report that mouse skeletal muscle increased interleukin (IL)–15 production during LCMV clone 13 chronic infection. Muscle-specific ablation of Il15 enhanced the CD8+ T cell exhaustion phenotype. Muscle-derived IL-15 was required to maintain a population of CD8+CD103+ muscle-infiltrating lymphocytes (MILs). MILs resided in a less inflamed microenvironment, expressed more T cell factor 1 (Tcf1), and had higher proliferative potential than splenic T cells. MILs differentiated into functional effector T cells after reentering lymphoid tissues. Increasing muscle mass via muscle-specific inhibition of TGFβ signaling enhanced IL-15 production and antiviral CD8+ T cell responses. We conclude that skeletal muscle antagonizes T cell exhaustion by protecting T cell proliferative potential from inflammation and replenishing the effector T cell progeny pool in lymphoid organs.

Gynecological Cancers Not a Risk for Severe COVID-19: Study | Health News

Gynecological Cancers Not a Risk for Severe COVID-19: Study | Health News

  • July 30, 2020

(HealthDay)

THURSDAY, July 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Despite rampant fears that cancer patients are at higher risk of having severe cases of COVID-19, a new study suggests gynecologic cancers do not boost the chances of hospitalization or death.

“Our study should be reassuring for women with gynecologic cancers who are worried that having cancer increases their risk of becoming seriously ill if they go to the hospital because of COVID-19,” said lead investigator Olivia Lara, an oncology fellow at NYU Langone’s Perlmutter Cancer Center.

For the study, Lara’s team reviewed the medical records of 121 women, aged 51 to 63, being treated simultaneously for gynecologic cancers and COVID-19 in New York City between March and April.

The results, published online July 31 in the journal Cancer, revealed that these women had similar hospitalization rates and death as those who only had COVID-19.

More than half of the study patients required hospitalization, and among those hospitalized one-quarter died, amounting to a 14% death rate.

The death rate among this sample is comparable to the 21% death rate identified in another study, which included 5,700 hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the city, the study authors noted.

The study could potentially alter the theory that cancer patients face worse odds when infected with COVID-19.

A full 75% of the women with gynecological cancer experienced only a mild form of the disease, according to the report.

The women’s risk of dying from COVID-19 did not increase even if they had late-stage cancer, cancer surgery or high-dose chemotherapy, the study authors said in a New York University news release.

Still, one risk factor related to cancer treatment seemed to increase the odds of death.

Women receiving immunotherapy — treatment that uses a person’s own immune system to fight cancer — were three times more likely to die than women who received standard cancer treatments such as radiation, surgery or chemotherapy.

But only eight out of the 121 participants included in the study were treated with immunotherapy, prompting the study authors to stress that the sample was too small to make any conclusions based on this finding.

The results do underscore the importance of receiving cancer screenings and treatments, despite COVID-19 fears.

“The basic rules of cancer care have not changed during the pandemic,” study senior investigator Dr. Bhavana Pothuri said in the news release. “Early detection, screening and care lead to more people surviving what remains a leading cause of death among American women.”

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Study Suggests Vitamin D May Help The Body Fight Infection

Study Suggests Vitamin D May Help The Body Fight Infection

  • July 28, 2020

A researcher says that vitamin D is like a steroid and is urging the public to spend some time outside soaking in the sunshine vitamin, while another urges caution saying that other factors may be at play. 

Based on findings published in The FEBS Journal, Israeli researchers have concluded that good levels of vitamin D may help people to fight the coronavirus more effectively and quickly, as well as reducing the chances of hospitalization. While this comes as good news, and supports other research suggesting the same, still other researchers are cautioning broad conclusions saying that other factors may be involved. 

This was a joint effort with Leumit Health Services to investigate whether there is a basis to suggestions of vitamin D being helpful in the current pandemic, and after publishing what she says may be the world’s largest population based study of its kind, Milana Frenkel-Morgenstern who is the head of Bar Ilan University’s Lab for the BioComputing of Complex Diseases, said that vitamin D is “like a steroid.”  This study compared those with negative results, to those who tested positive and those who were hospitalized and reported significant differences in their vitamin D levels. 

7,807 samples from Israelis who tested for coronavirus were studied, findings showed that the average vitamin D level for those who screened as being negative were within the internationally accepted adequate range levels, while those who were positive fell into the category of inadequate levels. 

Levels of less than 20 nanograms per milliliter of blood are considered to be inadequate levels of vitamin D. According to the researchers those in the sampling who tested negative were on average within the adequate range with a mean vitamin D count of 21 nanograms per milliliter, while those who tested positive were on average within the inadequate range with a mean vitamin D count of 19 nanograms per milliliter; and those who went on to be hospitalized had a mean vitamin D count of 17 nanograms per milliliter. 

In this study those who were aged 50+ were twice as likely to find themselves admitted to hospital with COVID-19 if they had low levels of vitamin D compared to those of a similar age who had adequate levels of vitamin D; and those aged 25-49 with low levels of vitamin D were 1.45 times more likely to be hospitalized than those with adequate levels, according to Frenkel-Morgenstern. 

Frenkel-Morgenstern does not think that vitamin D will prevent people from catching coronavirus, rather she believes that it boosts the body’s ability to fight it off once infected. She suggests that these results reflect that vitamin D is helping some people to experience relatively light effects from the virus and to stay out of the hospital, while others are ridding themselves of the virus before getting tested. Based on her findings she is suggesting that it is urgent, even during mid-pandemic, that people get outside and boost their vitamin D levels, as the prevalence of low levels of vitamin D is widespread internationally. 

Frenkel-Morgenstern also says that her findings should help to guide public policy as ironically the lockdowns and people avoiding outings are actually contributing to the low levels of vitamin D, and it is putting people at an increased risk, especially if they already had low levels. 

“The problem now is people stay indoors or in cars all day, not going to beaches, do not have the sun exposure,” she said, adding that she believed the best action people can take is ensuring they are spending time outside.

Frenkel-Morgenstern argues that health officials and authorities need to factor in vitamin D requirements for the human body into future restrictions, and they should avoid closing public outdoor spaces such as nature reserves and beaches. “This is why it’s so important to not close the beaches in any future lockdown,” she said. “People should go to the sun, to the sea.

Internationally there are increasing suggestions that good vitamin D levels, which have long been thought to have a range of health benefits, have helped people to deal with illness including coronavirus. Recently a German study concluded that “much more attention should be paid to the importance of vitamin D status for the development and course of the disease.”

This study involved 7,025 negative and 782 COVID-19 positive patients who were members of Leumit Health Services. The Israeli HMO was involved in the research process and said that these findings stand up to scrutiny “even after adjustment for age, gender, socio-economic status and chronic, mental and physical disorders.”

Still others such as Ella Sklan, who is head of a molecular virology lab at Tel Aviv University and is not connected to this study, thinks that people should keep the results of vitamin D research in perspective. She suggests that vitamin D is good for the immune system, but thinks that studies indicating benefits for coronavirus may be reflecting other variables such as levels of physical activity that may be impacting health. 

“People want to find something magic that will change everyone’s life now, but I wouldn’t rely on this thinking,” Sklan said.

Still, Frenkel-Morgenstern is not suggesting this is a cure or will magically prevent anyone from becoming ill, she is suggesting that these findings indicate vitamin D may help to boost the immune system and improve the body’s ability to fight infection compared to those with inadequate levels. 

Coronavirus Vaccine: Pfizer-BioNTech begin late-stage study of lead COVID-19 vaccine candidate

Coronavirus Vaccine: Pfizer-BioNTech begin late-stage study of lead COVID-19 vaccine candidate

  • July 28, 2020
German biotech BioNTech and U.S. drugmaker Pfizer Inc said on Monday they would begin a pivotal global study to evaluate their lead COVID-19 vaccine candidate.

If the study is successful, the companies could submit the vaccine for regulatory approval as early as October, putting them on track to supply up to 100 million doses by the end of 2020 and 1.3 billion by the end of 2021.

Patients are each given two doses of the drugmakers’ vaccine to help boost immunity, so the first 100 million doses would vaccinate around 50 million people.

The study is expected to include about 120 sites globally and could include up to 30,000 participants. It will include regions heavily impacted by COVID-19.

“The initiation of the Phase 2/3 trial is a major step forward in our progress toward providing a potential vaccine to help fight the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic,” said Kathrin Jansen, head of vaccine research and development at Pfizer.

The trial hones in on Pfizer’s most promising vaccine candidate, which it calls BNT162b2. Earlier studies filtered out other potential vaccines.

Pfizer has already has an agreement to sell 100 million doses of its vaccine to the U.S. government and give it the option to buy 500 million more. It is in talks with other governments, including the European Union, about similar deals.

Over 150 vaccines are being developed against COVID-19, which has claimed nearly 650,000 lives globally and crippled economies.

The vaccine utilizes chemical messenger RNA to mimic the surface of the coronavirus and teach the immune system to recognize and neutralize it. Although the technology has been around for years, there has never been an approved messenger RNA (mRNA)vaccine.

Moderna Inc also launched an advanced stage trial with 30,000 participants on Monday. Johnson & Johnson is starting clinical trials this week.

Single Vitamins see 166% Growth as Consumers Look to Boost Immunity During COVID-19 Lockdown - ResearchAndMarkets.com | Business

NeoImmuneTech Announces FDA Approval to Proceed with Second Study of NT-I7 (efineptakin alfa) in Adult COVID-19 Patients | Business

  • July 28, 2020

ROCKVILLE, Md.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Jul 27, 2020–

NeoImmuneTech, Inc., a clinical-stage T cell-focused biopharmaceutical company, today announced that it has received a study-may-proceed letter from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the second study evaluating NT-I7 (efineptakin alfa), a long-acting human IL-7, for the treatment of COVID-19. The investigator-initiated Phase 1 trial is being conducted by Jian Li Campian, M.D., Ph.D. of Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis. The trial is a multi-center, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study that will evaluate the safety and efficacy of NT-I7 in adult COVID-19 patients.

IL-7 is an important growth factor for the immune system, the release of which induces the development, proliferation, and persistence of naïve and memory T cells. IL-7 has been shown to restore lymphocyte count, enhance anti-viral T cell response, reduce T cell exhaustion and death, and thereby potentially improve clinical outcomes in patients with COVID-19, where low lymphocyte count strongly correlates with poor prognosis. NT-I7 is the only clinical-stage long-acting IL-7, and has demonstrated in multiple clinical trials to restore lymphocyte count, including naïve and memory T cells, and exhibits a well-tolerated safety profile.

“Treatments that harness and enhance the immune system, helping it fight diseases such as cancer and infectious diseases, hold promise in treating a viral infection such as COVID-19, where the immune system is extremely burdened and exhausted,” said Dr. Campian. “As a T-cell amplifier, NT-I7 is designed to boost the adaptive immune response, which is crucial for the clearance of the virus in COVID-19. I look forward to evaluating this therapeutic candidate in patients with COVID-19.”

“Continuing on our mission to improve patient lives, NeoImmuneTech is very pleased to have received FDA clearance to begin a second trial studying NT-I7 as a potential immune enhancer for adult COVID-19 patients. The two trials will complement each other and speed up enrollment as well as increase the number of patients,” said NgocDiep Le, M.D., Ph.D., Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer of NeoImmuneTech. “Since lymphopenia is a hallmark of COVID-19, patients with weakened immune systems are at particularly high risk for a serious infection of COVID-19, and subsequently have unfavorable clinical outcomes, including death. NeoImmuneTech hopes that NT-I7 could help to prevent the progression to severe COVID-19 and ultimately improve clinical outcomes for patients affected by this pandemic.”

About NT-I7

NT-I7 (efineptakin alfa) is the only clinical-stage long-acting human IL-7, and is being developed for oncologic and immunologic indications, in which T-cell amplification and increased functionality may provide clinical benefit. IL-7 is a fundamental cytokine for naïve and memory T-cell development and for sustaining immune response to chronic antigens (as in cancer) or foreign antigens (as in infectious diseases). NT-I7 exhibits favorable PK/PD and safety profiles, making it an ideal combination partner. NT-I7 is being studied in multiple clinical trials in solid tumors and as a vaccine adjuvant. Studies are being planned for testing in hematologic malignancies, additional solid tumors and other immunology-focused indications.

About NeoImmuneTech

NeoImmuneTech, Inc. (NIT) is a clinical-stage T cell-focused biopharmaceutical company, dedicated to expanding the horizon of immuno-oncology and enhancing immunity to infectious diseases. NIT is led by the scientific founder and inventor of NT-I7 (efineptakin alfa) and complemented by a strong executive team with rich industry experience at companies such as Novartis, BMS, GSK, Pfizer, Amgen, Eli Lilly, MedImmune/AstraZeneca and PwC. NIT is expanding rapidly in personnel and operations, as well as partnering with industry and academic leaders to investigate NT-I7 as monotherapy and in combination with various immunotherapeutics. For more information, please visit www.neoimmunetech.com.

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EXPLAINER: How an Old Tuberculosis Vaccine Might Help Fight the New Coronavirus

Pfizer-BioNTech Begin Late-Stage Study of Lead COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate

  • July 28, 2020

(Reuters) – German biotech BioNTech and U.S. drugmaker Pfizer Inc said on Monday they would begin a pivotal global study to evaluate their lead COVID-19 vaccine candidate.

If the study is successful, the companies could submit the vaccine for regulatory approval as early as October, putting them on track to supply up to 100 million doses by the end of 2020 and 1.3 billion by the end of 2021.

Patients are each given two doses of the drugmakers’ vaccine to help boost immunity, so the first 100 million doses would vaccinate around 50 million people.

The study is expected to include about 120 sites globally and could include up to 30,000 participants. It will include regions heavily impacted by COVID-19.

“The initiation of the Phase 2/3 trial is a major step forward in our progress toward providing a potential vaccine to help fight the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic,” said Kathrin Jansen, head of vaccine research and development at Pfizer.

The trial hones in on Pfizer’s most promising vaccine candidate, which it calls BNT162b2. Earlier studies filtered out other potential vaccines.

Pfizer has already has an agreement to sell 100 million doses of its vaccine to the U.S. government and give it the option to buy 500 million more. It is in talks with other governments, including the European Union, about similar deals.

Over 150 vaccines are being developed against COVID-19, which has claimed nearly 650,000 lives globally and crippled economies.

The vaccine utilizes chemical messenger RNA to mimic the surface of the coronavirus and teach the immune system to recognize and neutralize it. Although the technology has been around for years, there has never been an approved messenger RNA (mRNA)vaccine.

Moderna Inc also launched an advanced stage trial with 30,000 participants on Monday. Johnson & Johnson is starting clinical trials this week.

(Reporting by Vishwadha Chander in Bengaluru; Editing by Maju Samuel, Richard Chang and Aurora Ellis)

Pfizer-BioNTech begin late-stage study of lead COVID-19 vaccine candidate | News

Pfizer-BioNTech begin late-stage study of lead COVID-19 vaccine candidate | News

  • July 27, 2020

by

By Vishwadha Chander and Carl O’Donnell

(Reuters) – German biotech BioNTech and U.S. drugmaker Pfizer Inc said on Monday they would begin a pivotal global study to evaluate their lead COVID-19 vaccine candidate.

If the study is successful, the companies could submit the vaccine for regulatory approval as early as October, putting them on track to supply up to 100 million doses by the end of 2020 and 1.3 billion by the end of 2021.

Patients are each given two doses of the drugmakers’ vaccine to help boost immunity, so the first 100 million doses would vaccinate around 50 million people.

The study is expected to include about 120 sites globally and could include up to 30,000 participants. It will include regions heavily impacted by COVID-19.

“The initiation of the Phase 2/3 trial is a major step forward in our progress toward providing a potential vaccine to help fight the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic,” said Kathrin Jansen, head of vaccine research and development at Pfizer.

The trial hones in on Pfizer’s most promising vaccine candidate, which it calls BNT162b2. Earlier studies filtered out other potential vaccines.

Pfizer has already has an agreement to sell 100 million doses of its vaccine to the U.S. government and give it the option to buy 500 million more. It is in talks with other governments, including the European Union, about similar deals.

Over 150 vaccines are being developed against COVID-19, which has claimed nearly 650,000 lives globally and crippled economies.

The vaccine utilizes chemical messenger RNA to mimic the surface of the coronavirus and teach the immune system to recognize and neutralize it. Although the technology has been around for years, there has never been an approved messenger RNA (mRNA)vaccine.

Moderna Inc also launched an advanced stage trial with 30,000 participants on Monday. Johnson & Johnson is starting clinical trials this week.

(Reporting by Vishwadha Chander in Bengaluru; Editing by Maju Samuel, Richard Chang and Aurora Ellis)

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