British company launches multi-layer immune support formula |

Jack Estes Debrabander Discusses How Vitamin C Injection Could Help Boost Immunity Against Coronavirus |

  • August 1, 2020

Jack Estes Debrabander discusses how vitamin C injection could be used to help boost immunity against the coronavirus pandemic.

ANN ARBOR, MI / ACCESSWIRE / JULY 31, 2020 / IV bars are a growing trend in cities across America. The “bars” are actually centers administering researched and tested vitamin IVs and vitamin injections to patients. The injections or IVs are tailored to suit patient goals, whether those goals are superior hydration, increased vitamin C intake, or others. Jack Estes Debrabander plans on opening in IV bar in the city of Ann Arbor, Mich. He recently discussed how Vitamin C injection could help boost immunity against the coronavirus pandemic.

“Vitamin C is something many people take to boost the immune system, treat a vitamin C deficiency, or improve overall health,” Jack Estes Debrabander said. “Vitamin C injection is a convenient and efficient way to boost the immune system and provide your body the vitamins it needs fight off viruses.”

Jack Estes Debrabander explained that many times, the reason we get sick is because we’ve completely exhausted our bodies. This can be due to nutritional deficits, an abundance of stress, lack of sleep, or a variety of other issues. Jack Estes Debrabander stated that vitamin injections can be a way to immediately boost the immune system and decrease the chances of a cold or virus, like the recent coronavirus, taking hold. An article in Medical News Today stated that while vitamin C injections have not been proven to cure or treat COVID-19, it is though to aid in the reversal of some damage that can be caused by the virus.

“The goal is to enhance the natural immune system of the body,” Jack Estes Debrabander said. “It’s a preventative measure that could help your body fend off viruses and some other illnesses. It could also help reverse some of the damage caused.”

Jack Estes Debrabander added that vitamin C deficiency can also result in joint pain, discoloring of the skin, fatigue, wounds that won’t heal, and swollen or bleeding gums. He described that all of these painful side effects of this deficiency can be prevented by maintaining proper amounts of vitamin C in the body through vitamin C injections.

Jack Estes Debrabander explained that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved vitamin C injections as a means of treating vitamin C deficiency. He stated these injections are an ideal way to boost vitamin C levels when they need to be increased immediately. Injections are also an ideal alternative for anyone who has an aversion to oral supplements. Jack Estes Debrabander added that vitamin C injections can be used to heal wounds more quickly as well as a variety of off-label uses.

“IV bars are safe, convenient, and affordable places to receive vitamin C and other vitamin injections,” Jack Estes Debrabander said. “This is what we want to bring to Ann Arbor — a safe, comfortable place for people to seek superior health and an overall better quality of life. This service could be especially helpful now, during the heart of the coronavirus pandemic.”

CONTACT:

Caroline Hunter
Web Presence, LLC
+1 7865519491

SOURCE: Web Presence, LLC

View source version on accesswire.com:
https://www.accesswire.com/599770/Jack-Estes-Debrabander-Discusses-How-Vitamin-C-Injection-Could-Help-Boost-Immunity-Against-Coronavirus

Jack Estes Debrabander Discusses How Vitamin C Injection Could Help Boost Immunity Against Coronavirus

Jack Estes Debrabander Discusses How Vitamin C Injection Could Help Boost Immunity Against Coronavirus

  • July 31, 2020

Jack Estes Debrabander discusses how vitamin C injection could be used to help boost immunity against the coronavirus pandemic.

ANN ARBOR, MI / ACCESSWIRE / JULY 31, 2020 / IV bars are a growing trend in cities across America. The “bars” are actually centers administering researched and tested vitamin IVs and vitamin injections to patients. The injections or IVs are tailored to suit patient goals, whether those goals are superior hydration, increased vitamin C intake, or others. Jack Estes Debrabander plans on opening in IV bar in the city of Ann Arbor, Mich. He recently discussed how Vitamin C injection could help boost immunity against the coronavirus pandemic.

“Vitamin C is something many people take to boost the immune system, treat a vitamin C deficiency, or improve overall health,” Jack Estes Debrabander said. “Vitamin C injection is a convenient and efficient way to boost the immune system and provide your body the vitamins it needs fight off viruses.”

Jack Estes Debrabander explained that many times, the reason we get sick is because we’ve completely exhausted our bodies. This can be due to nutritional deficits, an abundance of stress, lack of sleep, or a variety of other issues. Jack Estes Debrabander stated that vitamin injections can be a way to immediately boost the immune system and decrease the chances of a cold or virus, like the recent coronavirus, taking hold. An article in Medical News Today stated that while vitamin C injections have not been proven to cure or treat COVID-19, it is though to aid in the reversal of some damage that can be caused by the virus.

“The goal is to enhance the natural immune system of the body,” Jack Estes Debrabander said. “It’s a preventative measure that could help your body fend off viruses and some other illnesses. It could also help reverse some of the damage caused.”

Jack Estes Debrabander added that vitamin C deficiency can also result in joint pain, discoloring of the skin, fatigue, wounds that won’t heal, and swollen or bleeding gums. He described that all of these painful side effects of this deficiency can be prevented by maintaining proper amounts of vitamin C in the body through vitamin C injections.

Jack Estes Debrabander explained that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved vitamin C injections as a means of treating vitamin C deficiency. He stated these injections are an ideal way to boost vitamin C levels when they need to be increased immediately. Injections are also an ideal alternative for anyone who has an aversion to oral supplements. Jack Estes Debrabander added that vitamin C injections can be used to heal wounds more quickly as well as a variety of off-label uses.

“IV bars are safe, convenient, and affordable places to receive vitamin C and other vitamin injections,” Jack Estes Debrabander said. “This is what we want to bring to Ann Arbor — a safe, comfortable place for people to seek superior health and an overall better quality of life. This service could be especially helpful now, during the heart of the coronavirus pandemic.”

CONTACT:

Caroline Hunter
Web Presence, LLC
+1 7865519491

SOURCE: Web Presence, LLC

View source version on accesswire.com:
https://www.accesswire.com/599770/Jack-Estes-Debrabander-Discusses-How-Vitamin-C-Injection-Could-Help-Boost-Immunity-Against-Coronavirus

Can Vitamin C Boost Immunity? – WCCO

Can Vitamin C Boost Immunity? – WCCO

  • July 29, 2020
Vitamin B complex benefits: Strong immune system, good digestion and more; food sources rich in B vitamins

Vitamin B complex benefits: Strong immune system, good digestion and more; food sources rich in B vitamins

  • July 29, 2020

Add vitamin B-rich foods to your diet to boost your immune system: Benefits, foods high in B complex vitamins


Vitamin B complex benefits: Strong immune system, good digestion and more; food sources rich in B vitamins&nbsp | &nbspPhoto Credit:&nbspiStock Images

Key Highlights

  • B vitamins have a crucial role in maintaining your overall health and well-being

  • They can also help keep your immune system strong, thereby preventing infections

  • Here’s how eating vitamin B-rich foods can benefit your health and help you stay healthy during the pandemic

New Delhi: One of the best ways to build resistance against the novel coronavirus infection and other viral attacks is to feed your body with nutrient-dense foods that can help strengthen your immune system, your body’s first line of defense against viruses and diseases. Research has shown that eating foods rich in certain vitamins – such as vitamin B complex, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin B and vitamin E – can help your immune system fight off infections.

The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has now infected about 16,514,500 people and claimed at least 654,477 lives all over the world. With no cure available for the deadly virus that causes COVID-19, taking all possible measures and maintaining a healthy lifestyle, including eating a balanced diet, to not get it in the first place is the safest for all of us. In fact, the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) recently recommended to include vitamin B-rich plant-based foods in diet to boost your nervous system and immunity.

What are the health benefits of vitamin B complex?

Basically, vitamin B complex consists of eight different vitamins, which are essential for maintaining good health and well-being. The B vitamins are: thiamin (B1), riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), pantothenic acid (B5), pyridoxine (B6), biotin (B7), folic acid or folate (B9) and cobalamin (B12).

Some of the benefits of vitamin B complex include:

  • It can help strengthen your immune system, thereby preventing or reducing your risk of infections
  • It helps support the growth of red blood cells
  • It promotes proper nerve and healthy brain function
  • It improves energy levels
  • It boosts cardiovascular health
  • It is good for digestion
  • It supports muscle tone
  • It supports the production of hormones and cholesterol

B vitamins are particularly important for pregnant and lactating women as they help in faetal brain development as well as lower the risk of birth defects. These vitamins may also help increase testosterone levels in men.

A deficiency of this vitamin can put you at a higher risk of certain conditions such as anaemia, infections, digestive issues, peripheral neuropathy, skin problems, etc.

Food sources of vitamin B complex

B vitamins can be found in a number of foods. Some of the foods that are high in B vitamins include:

  1. Leafy greens: Leafy green veggies like spinach, turnip greens, collards and romaine lettuce, are among the highest sources of folate. You can eat them raw or steam them briefly to retain the most nutrient.
  2. Eggs: Eggs are one of the best sources of biotin – just next to liver – that plays a vital role in your hair, skin, nail and hair health. One large egg can help you get 33 per cent of the recommended daily intake (RDI) for biotin distributed the yolk and white.
  3. Legumes: Apart from being high in folic acid, legumes also provide small amounts of other B vitamins such as thiamine, riboflavin, pantothenic acid and pyridoxine. Folate reduces the risk of birth defects.
  4. Walnuts: Walnuts are high in several vitamins, minerals and antioxidants such as copper, phosphorus, folate, pyridoxine, manganese, vitamin E, etc.
  5. Salmon: Salmon is loaded with omega-3 fatty acids and several B vitamins, including riboflavin, niacin, B6 and B12. Moreover, this nutritious fish is high in protein but low in mercury.

Try eating a healthy diet that includes a wide variety of food sources to ensure that you’re getting enough of each B vitamin to support your immune system, improve overall health and reduce your risk of infections, including COVID-19 disease.

Disclaimer: Tips and suggestions mentioned in the article are for general information purpose only and should not be construed as professional medical advice. Always consult your doctor or a dietician before starting any fitness programme or making any changes to your diet.

Study Suggests Vitamin D May Help The Body Fight Infection

Study Suggests Vitamin D May Help The Body Fight Infection

  • July 28, 2020

A researcher says that vitamin D is like a steroid and is urging the public to spend some time outside soaking in the sunshine vitamin, while another urges caution saying that other factors may be at play. 

Based on findings published in The FEBS Journal, Israeli researchers have concluded that good levels of vitamin D may help people to fight the coronavirus more effectively and quickly, as well as reducing the chances of hospitalization. While this comes as good news, and supports other research suggesting the same, still other researchers are cautioning broad conclusions saying that other factors may be involved. 

This was a joint effort with Leumit Health Services to investigate whether there is a basis to suggestions of vitamin D being helpful in the current pandemic, and after publishing what she says may be the world’s largest population based study of its kind, Milana Frenkel-Morgenstern who is the head of Bar Ilan University’s Lab for the BioComputing of Complex Diseases, said that vitamin D is “like a steroid.”  This study compared those with negative results, to those who tested positive and those who were hospitalized and reported significant differences in their vitamin D levels. 

7,807 samples from Israelis who tested for coronavirus were studied, findings showed that the average vitamin D level for those who screened as being negative were within the internationally accepted adequate range levels, while those who were positive fell into the category of inadequate levels. 

Levels of less than 20 nanograms per milliliter of blood are considered to be inadequate levels of vitamin D. According to the researchers those in the sampling who tested negative were on average within the adequate range with a mean vitamin D count of 21 nanograms per milliliter, while those who tested positive were on average within the inadequate range with a mean vitamin D count of 19 nanograms per milliliter; and those who went on to be hospitalized had a mean vitamin D count of 17 nanograms per milliliter. 

In this study those who were aged 50+ were twice as likely to find themselves admitted to hospital with COVID-19 if they had low levels of vitamin D compared to those of a similar age who had adequate levels of vitamin D; and those aged 25-49 with low levels of vitamin D were 1.45 times more likely to be hospitalized than those with adequate levels, according to Frenkel-Morgenstern. 

Frenkel-Morgenstern does not think that vitamin D will prevent people from catching coronavirus, rather she believes that it boosts the body’s ability to fight it off once infected. She suggests that these results reflect that vitamin D is helping some people to experience relatively light effects from the virus and to stay out of the hospital, while others are ridding themselves of the virus before getting tested. Based on her findings she is suggesting that it is urgent, even during mid-pandemic, that people get outside and boost their vitamin D levels, as the prevalence of low levels of vitamin D is widespread internationally. 

Frenkel-Morgenstern also says that her findings should help to guide public policy as ironically the lockdowns and people avoiding outings are actually contributing to the low levels of vitamin D, and it is putting people at an increased risk, especially if they already had low levels. 

“The problem now is people stay indoors or in cars all day, not going to beaches, do not have the sun exposure,” she said, adding that she believed the best action people can take is ensuring they are spending time outside.

Frenkel-Morgenstern argues that health officials and authorities need to factor in vitamin D requirements for the human body into future restrictions, and they should avoid closing public outdoor spaces such as nature reserves and beaches. “This is why it’s so important to not close the beaches in any future lockdown,” she said. “People should go to the sun, to the sea.

Internationally there are increasing suggestions that good vitamin D levels, which have long been thought to have a range of health benefits, have helped people to deal with illness including coronavirus. Recently a German study concluded that “much more attention should be paid to the importance of vitamin D status for the development and course of the disease.”

This study involved 7,025 negative and 782 COVID-19 positive patients who were members of Leumit Health Services. The Israeli HMO was involved in the research process and said that these findings stand up to scrutiny “even after adjustment for age, gender, socio-economic status and chronic, mental and physical disorders.”

Still others such as Ella Sklan, who is head of a molecular virology lab at Tel Aviv University and is not connected to this study, thinks that people should keep the results of vitamin D research in perspective. She suggests that vitamin D is good for the immune system, but thinks that studies indicating benefits for coronavirus may be reflecting other variables such as levels of physical activity that may be impacting health. 

“People want to find something magic that will change everyone’s life now, but I wouldn’t rely on this thinking,” Sklan said.

Still, Frenkel-Morgenstern is not suggesting this is a cure or will magically prevent anyone from becoming ill, she is suggesting that these findings indicate vitamin D may help to boost the immune system and improve the body’s ability to fight infection compared to those with inadequate levels. 

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10 Plant-Based Vitamin C Supplements to Boost Immune Function and Fight Chronic Disease

  • July 27, 2020

We could probably spend most of the day going back and forth about all the essential and vital vitamins necessary for a well-balanced, healthy diet.

Yet, one nutrient that generally doesn’t require any convincing is vitamin C!

Vitamin C — also called ascorbic acid — is a powerful and wonderful ally for the body, specifically when it comes to promoting healing, boosting the immune system, and fighting chronic diseases. This may be in part due to the fact that vitamin C actually works as an antioxidant, — this is especially important for boosting immune system function and fighting chronic disease — yet it also plays a huge role in helping your body to “form blood vessels, cartilage, muscle, and collagen in bones,” is integral for the healing process, absorbs and stores iron, and plays a role in many bodily functions such as producing “L-carnitine and some neurotransmitters.”

Basically, vitamin C has its helpful hands all over your bodily systems!

When it comes to getting vitamin C in your body there are three avenues to take.

First, through diet. Many plant-based foods are packed with vitamin C including Kakadu plums, — an “an Australian native superfood containing 100 times more vitamin C than oranges” — acerola cherries (half cup contains 822 mg), rose hips (six rose hips provide 119 mg), chili peppers (one green chili pepper contains 109 mg), sweet yellow peppers (half cup provides 137 mg), blackcurrants (half cup contains 101 mg), and mustard spinach (one cup provides 195 mg).” Along with getting your daily dose of vitamin C, you’ll also receive any other nutritional benefits that these foods have to offer!

Secondly, if you’re really wanting to go all-in on the vitamin C supplementation bandwagon, you can go with intravenous shots. While vitamin C shots aren’t a new medical practice, they are somewhat new to the health trend scene. Many doctors will prescribe vitamin C shots for those with a specific deficiency, but this form of vitamin C supplementation is not yet approved by the FDA.

Third, you can go with a good old fashioned daily supplement! When choosing a supplement, make sure you’re looking for reliable and safe options. For example, you’ll want to go with a supplement that is “plant-based or vegan, organic, and uses non-GMO ingredients.” On top of that, it’s a good idea to find companies that “abstain from using preservatives, fillers, binders, or any other artificial ingredients.”






Ready to give vitamin C supplements a try! Here are a few to get you started.

1. NutraMedix Vitamin C 1000mg Capsules

NutraMedix Vitamin C 1000mg Capsules

NutraMedix Vitamin C 1000mg Capsules/Amazon.com

These NutraMedix Vitamin C 1000mg Capsules not only offer a potent dose of vitamin C, but they also guarantee a purified source of ascorbic acid. These capsules are vegan-friendly, non-GMO, and allergen-friendly — free of gluten, yeast, soy, and dairy. NutraMedix prides itself as a company you can trust, offering bioavailable nutritional supplements since 1993. A 120-capsule bottle costs $26.95.

Teri says “High-quality vitamin C from real food sources, not man-made.”

2. NaturesPlus Source of Life Garden Certified Organic Vitamin C

NaturesPlus Source of Life Garden Certified Organic Vitamin C

NaturesPlus Source of Life Garden Certified Organic Vitamin C/Amazon.com

This NaturesPlus Source of Life Garden Certified Organic Vitamin C promises to be sourced from whole food, plant-based bioavailable foods such as 100 percent certified amla berry, citrus fruits, and acerola cherry. The capsules are infused with synergistic phytonutrients and whole-food enzymes. This supplement is vegan, USDA certified organic, non-GMO, and made with safe, high-quality, and natural ingredients. NaturesPlus guarantees their product is manufactured in a state of the art facility that is both NSF and FDA registered. A 60-capsule bottle costs $30.30.

ZoomDoc says “In order for vitamin C to work properly it must be surrounded by bioflavonoids. I would never take just plain ascorbic acid at this stage of my evolution. Amla berry and Camu Camu have the highest proportion of natural vitamin C in the world. I buy Camu powder in bulk but still wanted something I could take in veggie caps. When I examined this product it looked interesting. All organic and vegetable and fruit sources. No fillers binders or stearic acid flow agents. A bit pricey but you are getting more than just vitamin C in this product. The emphasis is on Vitamin C but this has so much more. Can’t be beaten. Excellent formulation. Thanks, Source of Life Garden.” 

3. Pure Encapsulations Ascorbic Acid Capsules

Pure Encapsulations Ascorbic Acid Capsules

Pure Encapsulations Ascorbic Acid Capsules/Amazon.com

Pure Encapsulations is a one-of-a-kind, trusted brand offering a wide range of vegan supplement options! These Pure Encapsulations Ascorbic Acid Capsules helps each of us meet our individual daily vitamin C needs with a vegan-friendly, gluten-free, hypoallergenic, non-GMO design. Along with supporting the immune system, this vitamin C supplement is a potent antioxidant and free radical scavenger, which aids in fighting chronic disease. These capsules are hypoallergenic, which means they are free of wheat, egg, peanuts, magnesium stearate, hydrogenated fat, artificial sweeteners and colors, and other unnecessary excipients. A 90-capsule bottle costs $17.90.

L. Quadri says “This product is so worth the price! I had not found a Vitamin C pill this strength that I could swallow, until switching to these. I trust this brand and it’s nice to know you’re not getting a bunch of extra fillers.

4. Truvani Vitamin C

Truvani Vitamin C

Truvani Vitamin C/Amazon.com

This Truvani Vitamin C offers a USDA certified 100 percent organic source of powerful vitamin C! Truvani promises that their supplement is free of hidden “proprietary blends” and is made with only the highest-quality, natural, vegan ingredients such as amla berries. Formulated to support the immune system and promote hair, skin, and nail health via collagen production, Truvani offers complete transparency in their ingredients. A 30-serving bottle costs $24.99.

Melanie Ginsburg says “It makes me feel so much better when I know exactly what I’m putting in my body. And I love that Truvani only uses the highest quality products. It makes being healthy much easier!”

5. Doctor’s Best Vitamin C with Quali-C

Doctor's Best Vitamin C with Quali-C

Doctor’s Best Vitamin C with Quali-C/Amazon.com

If you’re looking for a great go-to vegan supplement brand, look no further than Doctor’s Best! They offer a wide range of non-GMO, gluten-free, vegan-friendly supplements at excellent prices. This Doctor’s Best Vitamin C with Quali-C supplement is formulated from ascorbic acid that is prized for quality and reliability. Along with supporting the immune system, stimulating collagen production, and fighting chronic disease, this supplement supports numerous metabolic enzymes in addition to enhancing the body’s total antioxidant potential. As with other Doctor’s Best supplements, these capsules are vegan, gluten-free, and non-GMO. A 120-capsule bottle costs $10.15.

Amazon Customer says “The quality of these vitamins has been verified for me. Both of my children brought home bad colds from school and my husband and I avoided catching it even though we were the designated nose wipers. My mother came to visit while they still had runny noses and unfortunately she left with a cold. I now swear by these vitamins and the other variety of dr best vitamins I take daily.”

6. NOW Supplements Vitamin C-1,000

NOW Supplements Vitamin C-1,000

NOW Supplements Vitamin C-1,000/Amazon.com

Along with Doctor’s Best, NOW supplements are also a great go-to, affordable, vegan, and vegetarian-friendly brand! This NOW Supplements Vitamin C-1,000 is specially formulated to “provide a sustained release of vitamin C” meaning you’ll get continuous support throughout the day. Plus, they source their vitamin C from one of the most natural sources, rose hips! This product is certified vegan and non-GMO, is soy-free, Kosher, and has been manufactured in a quality GMP facility. A 250-capsule bottle costs $18.70.

Jamison says “My wife and I have tried a few other vitamin C brands previously that gave her awful heartburn. We’ve been taking NOW vitamin C for a while now (on our second bottle) and she hasn’t had any heartburn/acid reflux issues from it. The pills aren’t really small but are easy to swallow in my opinion. I can’t remember the last time I was sick and I believe 100% that taking vitamin C is the main reason. I’m currently taking 2 tablets a day (2,000 mg total). I take one with breakfast and one with supper. I usually increase to 4/day when I’ve been around others that are sick.”

7. Amazon Elements Vitamin C 1000mg

Amazon Elements Vitamin C 1000mg

Amazon Elements Vitamin C 1000mg/Amazon.com

Did you know that Amazon is now producing its own supplements? And, many of them are vegan-friendly? This Amazon Elements Vitamin C 1000mg supplement comes in a whopping 300 tablets — that’s an amazing 10-month supply — one of the largest doses at one of the lowest prices available on the market! Plus, these capsules are clean and pure! They’re vegan, gluten-free, and contain zero artificial colors, flavors, or chemical preservatives. On top of that, they’re made in a GMP facility! A 300-tablet bottle costs $17.99.

Kerrie A. says “Vitamins generally upset my stomach but this one doesn’t. I’ve taken it once a day since I got it and it seems to be helping through winter/cold and flu season.”

8.NATURELO Vitamin C with Organic Acerola Cherry and Natural Citrus Bioflavonoids

NATURELO Vitamin C with Organic Acerola Cherry and Natural Citrus Bioflavonoids

NATURELO Vitamin C with Organic Acerola Cherry and Natural Citrus Bioflavonoids/Amazon.com

This NATURELO Vitamin C with Organic Acerola Cherry and Natural Citrus Bioflavonoids offers one of the more diversely sourced vitamin C on the market. Within each time-released capsule, you’ll get vitamin C sourced from acerola cherries, organic orange, and organic lemon, all of which enhance the bioavailability of vitamin C. In fact, these natural citrus bioflavonoids have been shown to “increase the absorption of vitamin C by as much as 35 [percent].” NATURELO promises its product to be vegan-friendly, plant-based, and free of GMOs, gluten, soy, yeast, dairy, eggs, nuts, caffeine, and artificial ingredients such as coloring, preservatives, and flavoring. A 90-capsule bottle costs $24.95.

A Bombich says “I have been taking NATURELO Premium Vitamin C for a number of months now. I began taking it after determining that the vitamin C sold almost everywhere over the counter is ascorbic acid, basically a chemical product. I chose Naturelo because its source was Organic Acerola Cherry, a great source. I have not particularly seen an abrupt effect after beginning to take it. I frankly did not expect to see one. Naturelo Vitamin C has become one of my daily supplements and its cost is reasonable.” 

9. Pure Ascorbic Acid Powder

Micro Ingredients Pure Ascorbic Acid Powder

Micro Ingredients Pure Ascorbic Acid Powder/Amazon.com

Oftentimes, supplements just don’t sit right for some of our digestive systems. Luckily, there are other options! This Micro Ingredients Pure Ascorbic Acid Powder offers a water-soluble, quick-absorption, powdered version of vitamin C that can be added to smoothies, oatmeal, or even baking recipes! This powder is rich in antioxidants and is formulated specifically to promote immune function, boost energy, and aid in overall health. This product is vegan-friendly and is free of gluten, GMOs, irradiation, additives, preservatives, and artificial colors. A 2.2-pound bag costs $25.95.

A. Frazier says “I purchased this to start taking in hopes to help ward off colds this winter. I can’t really say how well it’s working for that for sure, but I’ve been taking it a month now and my kids have had a few colds (thanks to being back to school) and I haven’t caught them. So maybe it’s helping or maybe I’ve been lucky. BUT, holy moly a side effect I wasn’t anticipating was how strong my nails were going to get from taking this! I always keep my nails very short because they are so weak and brittle but they look so healthy and are so strong now. I know it’s from this because I literally haven’t changed anything else in my diet. As far as the taste goes, it tastes as expected. Sour like lemons. I just add it to a shot glass of water and chug it down and don’t mind the flavor at all. I think the price for the amount is great. I’d imagine this bag lasting quite a long time; as I’ve barely made a dent in it after daily use for a month.”

10. X Gold Health Premium Vitamin C 1400mg Enhanced with Citrus Bioflavonoids & Rutin

X Gold Health Premium Vitamin C 1400mg Enhanced with Citrus Bioflavonoids & Rutin

 

X Gold Health Premium Vitamin C 1400mg Enhanced with Citrus Bioflavonoids & Rutin/Amazon.com

This X Gold Health Premium Vitamin C 1400mg Enhanced with Citrus Bioflavonoids & Rutin offers something that the others don’t — bioflavonoids enhancement via rutin. Along with other citrus bioflavonoids, rutin works synergistically to support the immune system and protect cells. On top of that, X Gold Health offers one of the most potent forms of vitamin C in 1400 milligram capsules to support immune health, collagen production, and the healing process. This product is vegan and vegetarian-friendly, non-GMO, gluten-free, third-party tested, and is free of synthetic fillers! A 120-capsule bottle costs $17.50.

lindaxyz says “I am very happy with this vitamin C not just because it is a good strong dosage but because it also has Bioflavonoids and Rutin added. This combination is wonderful to get the most out of the vitamin C. Just google the ingredients to see the health benefits! So glad I found this supplement during this pandemic. Boosting my immunity system is more important now than ever! Thankful for this great product! I’ve had no side effects but I do take it with food or a full glass of water.”

We also highly recommend downloading our Food Monster App, which is available for iPhone, and can also be found on Instagram and Facebook. The app has more than 15,000 plant-based, allergy-friendly recipes, and subscribers gain access to new recipes every day. Check it out! For more Vegan Food, Health, Recipe, Animal, and Life content published daily, don’t forget to subscribe to the One Green Planet Newsletter! Being publicly-funded gives us a greater chance to continue providing you with high-quality content. Please support us!





Immunity startup creates high dose vitamin drinks for rapid recovery

Immunity startup creates high dose vitamin drinks for rapid recovery

  • July 27, 2020

Amsterdam born and England raised Sunna Van Kampen is founder of the startup company Tonic Health​, selling immunity supporting health drinks with high doses of vitamin C, D and zinc alongside natural plant extracts which aim to boost illness recovery time.

Health innovation certainly didn’t seem an obvious destination for this business graduate who admits he always used to rebel against health and nutrition.

“Growing up in Totness, in South Devon, it was a funny little forward-thinking microcosm with its own currency, it aimed to be the first oil-free town, it was very health focused and everyone was really into organic foods.

“Naturally, as a boy I always wanted to rebel against my mum’s healthy food and when I went to uni I was eating all the Mars Bars and McDonald’s I could.”

Sunna

Sunna Van Kampen

But it didn’t take long for the downsides of junk food to manifest.

 “I started my corporate career, working in banks in London and I was finding that I would come down with colds and flu three or four times every winter and it would always take me ages to recover.

“I became frustrated with the cold and flu products on offer, like Lemsip, which were mostly to cover up the symptoms rather than to help with recovery and I became really interested in what I could eat or drink to help my body avoid these bugs and fight them off more efficiently.

“I began experimenting with different ingredients like ginger, turmeric and garlic and I would take these potions, which were essentially shots of ground up pureed ingredients, four times a day from the first sign of a cold and I found this massively improved my recovery time.”

Vitamin C by IV and an FBI raid: How hope, rather than proof, sent the antioxidant’s sales soaring during COVID-19. - News - The Times

Vitamin C by IV and an FBI raid: How hope, rather than proof, sent the antioxidant’s sales soaring during COVID-19. – News – Ellwood City Ledger

  • July 22, 2020

Wearing face masks and protective Tyvek suits with yellow boots, FBI investigators recently raided a medical building in metro Detroit to gather evidence about an alleged fake treatment being sold for

It looked like a drug bust. Authorities sealed off the building’s entrance, carried away boxes and enlisted local police to secure the area.

But this wasn’t a rogue lab getting seized for illicit substances.

In this case, agents were investigating a suspected scheme involving an essential nutrient found in orange juice, broccoli and strawberries:

Vitamin C.

Otherwise known as ascorbic acid, this powerful antioxidant has become the subject of faith, controversy and even frequent government crackdowns during the pandemic. It’s also become more popular than ever, benefiting from religious-like claims and beliefs about its effectiveness against COVID-19 despite not even having the power to cure the common cold.

Why your new boss may let you work from anywhere: More companies see benefits of letting new hires work  from far away, even once COVID-19 fades

2 COVID Americas: One hopes for an extension of federal unemployment and stimulus. The other is saving and spending.

“I am aware of no other nutrient that causes such emotion,” said Dr. Daniel Monti, chair of Integrative Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia.

Consumers have shown that with their wallets, including some who mainline it into their veins or just load up on tablets. Vitamin C supplement sales soared to about $209 million during the first half of 2020, up 76% compared with the same period last year, according to Nielsen research.

In the federal case near Detroit, Dr. Charles Mok has been charged with health care fraud and is accused of using the pandemic as an opportunity to bill insurers, including Medicare, for high-dose vitamin C intravenous infusions that authorities say were “fraudulently represented as COVID-19 treatments and preventative measures.”

His case drew investigators from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the FBI, who wore protective gear during the raid in April to guard against exposure to COVID-19. Mok’s next court date is scheduled for September.

Since April, the Federal Trade Commission also has issued at least 37 warning letters to health clinics and wellness centers across the nation, accusing them of overhyping similar high-dose IV infusions of vitamin C. The FTC regulates against deceptive business practices and accused the clinics of unlawfully marketing such therapies to prevent or treat COVID-19, a disease without a proven cure or prevention.

Some claims were brazen. “Research shows that high dose Vitamin C is effective against COVID-19,” said the website of the LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine in St. Charles, Ill., according to the FTC’s warning in April. “GIVE US A CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR VITAMIN C IV AT 50% OFF!”

The FTC told the firm and others to cease such claims because they lacked sufficient scientific evidence.

The businesses since have taken down their COVID claims, but many generally still offer such IV treatments to boost immunity and overall health despite being considered dubious by many experts.

Such treatments often sell for about $200 and are generally considered safe for patients to receive under proper medical oversight. But there are risks. They’re not scientifically proven, meaning customers might be spending their money on a service that may or may not work.

Selling hope: Stem cell companies offer unproven medicine for COVID-19

Bye bye $600: Think that extra $600 in unemployment benefits will last until the end of July? Think again.

History of misunderstanding

So why all the fuss over a household vitamin that can be squeezed out of a grapefruit?

Because it’s a form of hope against the fear of the deadly coronavirus, medical experts say. And that hope has surged even though claims about its powers generally are unreliable, false or premature at best without more evidence from experimental clinical trials, according to experts in nutrition and medicine.

Vitamin C still has its champions. Take the case of movie and TV stuntman Greg Fitzpatrick, the longtime double of actor Ben Stiller. Fitzpatrick attributes his recovery from a prostate cancer diagnosis in 2016 to a change in diet and regular intake of high-dose vitamin C. He also continues to get 75 grams of IV therapy weekly because he said he believes it boosts his immune system and “keeps me healthy during COVID.”

“Can you prove it? I guess not,” Fitzpatrick told USA TODAY. He said he believes in it “wholeheartedly.”

Vitamin C “has not been studied with much rigor,” said Alexander Michels, research coordinator at the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, which studies the role of vitamins in human health. “The molecule – ascorbic acid – is not easy to work with and has properties that make it difficult to understand. Therefore, it has a long history of misunderstanding in the scientific community and medical practice.”

Clinical trials involving COVID-19 vitamin C treatments are pending and could take years before reaching conclusions. Monti’s team at Thomas Jefferson aims to see whether IV vitamin C can help prevent progression of the disease and avoid the need to put patients on a ventilator.

“If I ever had to be treated for COVID, I would definitely push to be put on my own trial to get IV vitamin C – not because there is current proof it would do anything but because I believe there is a plausible mechanism that it might,” Monti said.

Monti and other health care experts say most people generally get all the vitamin C they need by eating a good amount of fruits and vegetables, which helps boost their immune system and overall health.

But when the pandemic hit, people wanted to believe that consuming larger doses could defend the body against the novel coronavirus, echoing a similar theory that spread in the popular culture starting around 1970.

That’s when vitamin C evangelist Linus Pauling published his book “Vitamin C and the Common Cold,” which made the case that a bigger dose could build up a better defense, a notion now considered to be debatable at best and discredited at worst.

Fifty years later, the belief was again dispersed rapidly and globally.

Viral misinformation

In January, misinformation already was transmitting on social media before the pandemic shut down the U.S. economy.  In one example, a Facebook user advised people in the Philippines to “load up” on vitamin C to prevent COVID-19, among other advice. That post was shared at least 15,000 times but ultimately was flagged for false information.

By early March, 21% in the U.S. thought that taking vitamin C “probably” or “definitely” prevents infection and 26% were unsure, according to a national probability survey cited in a study of misinformation on the disease by the Harvard Kennedy School.

On Instagram, actress Marla Maples, the former wife of President Donald Trump, has been among those vouching for it.

“Now I’m getting a vitamin C drip (IV),” she said in a March 13 post that showed her getting an infusion. “I’ve done this off and on for a few years, but right now I feel like it’s really more important because of the spread of the coronavirus and flus and other viruses we may not even know of that are in our world. Do all you can to build your immune system right now. Take your liposomal vitamin C.  if you have the chance and can find someone that does vitamin C drips, I would look it up.”

Maples didn’t respond to a message seeking comment through her website.

By late March, the Australian government decided to make a public statement about an unspecified report that said intravenous high-dose vitamin C may be beneficial in the management of a COVID-19 infection.

“We have investigated this report and found there is no robust scientific evidence to support the usage of this vitamin in the management of COVID-19,” said Australia’s Therapeutic Goods Administration.

In the U.S., health-related businesses started trying to cash in with IV therapies, citing reports of positive results from China in the treatment of COVID-19. After the FTC cracked down on it, many cut the claims.

In the Detroit area case, Dr. Mok’s Allure Medical spa based in Shelby Township “submitted at least 98 claims to insurance companies, including Medicare, related to Vitamin-C infusion therapy services offered to patients as purported COVID-19 treatment and preventative care,” according to the federal criminal complaint against him. His attorney declined comment.

Such firms generally are for-profit and are not taking part in experimental clinical trials seeking to establish scientific evidence on vitamin C.

In those clinical trials, intravenous vitamin C has shown promise in treatments for sepsis and some tumor types, Monti said.

By contrast, many wellness centers and naturopathic firms still offer unproven intravenous vitamin C therapies, saying they boost immunity and health with antioxidants.

“Higher blood levels of vitamin C can be achieved with IV infusion than with oral intake, and that would be the argument for IV administration: a rapid spike in blood levels that exert some acute anti-microbial effect,” said Dr. David Katz, a preventative medicine specialist and founding director of Yale University’s Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center. “I am aware of no actual evidence of benefit, so this is hope and wishful thinking on the part of the recipient, and opportunism and exploitation on the part of the provider.”

Only one injection product cleared

The manner in which these injectable vitamin C products are sold and distributed also is murky under the law.

Only one vitamin C injection product has been approved for use in the U.S. by the Food and Drug Administration, which regulates drug safety and effectiveness. That product is Ascor by McGuff Pharmaceuticals and is approved only for the short-term treatment of scurvy, a disease caused by vitamin C deficiency.

Yet the wellness firms that sell IV therapies are not treating scurvy and don’t necessarily require a prescription, depending on the dosage. Several said they obtain the vitamin C from compounding pharmacies, which don’t appear to be selling Ascor and might get the vitamin C from elsewhere, sometimes derived from corn.

Last October, the FDA even took the step of issuing a warning that said, “All other ascorbic acid injection products are unapproved new drugs that should not be distributed in interstate commerce without a new drug application approved by FDA.”

So then how are these other vitamin C injection products compliant with the law?

“This is a very complicated question and has been at the heart of various changes and the evolution of compounding pharmacy laws and regulations for many years,” said Nicholas Hoang of McGuff Pharmaceuticals, the maker of Ascor.

The FDA didn’t answer a request for clarity. Pharmacies that were identified as providing these products to wellness firms didn’t immediately return messages, nor did naturopathic doctors with expertise in IV therapies.

Compounding pharmacies do have some legal leeway when tailoring drugs for individuals, as do doctors who can make approved drugs available for off-label uses. But how the vitamin C IV business jibes with the FDA isn’t clear, nor is much of the science surrounding vitamin C for consumers. In general, Monti said, vitamin C has provoked strong claims from famous scientists for decades, as well as strong counter-arguments from others.

“If (consumers) take it and see a positive effect, who can really discount their experience?” Michels of the Pauling Institute said in an e-mail. “On the other hand, the science is lagging far, far behind. Consumers, doctors, and scientists alike often think they know everything there is to know about vitamin C, but most of them have an incomplete picture. Even those who have dedicated their lives to studying this vitamin admit that they know very little.”

Follow reporter Brent Schrotenboer @Schrotenboer. E-mail: bschrotenb@usatoday.com

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Vitamin C by IV and an FBI raid. How hope, rather than proof, sent the antioxidant’s sales soaring during COVID-19.

Vitamin C by IV and an FBI raid: How hope, rather than proof, sent the antioxidant’s sales soaring during COVID-19. - News - The Times

Vitamin C by IV and an FBI raid: How hope, rather than proof, sent the antioxidant’s sales soaring during COVID-19. – News – The Times

  • July 22, 2020

Wearing face masks and protective Tyvek suits with yellow boots, FBI investigators recently raided a medical building in metro Detroit to gather evidence about an alleged fake treatment being sold for

It looked like a drug bust. Authorities sealed off the building’s entrance, carried away boxes and enlisted local police to secure the area.

But this wasn’t a rogue lab getting seized for illicit substances.

In this case, agents were investigating a suspected scheme involving an essential nutrient found in orange juice, broccoli and strawberries:

Vitamin C.

Otherwise known as ascorbic acid, this powerful antioxidant has become the subject of faith, controversy and even frequent government crackdowns during the pandemic. It’s also become more popular than ever, benefiting from religious-like claims and beliefs about its effectiveness against COVID-19 despite not even having the power to cure the common cold.

Why your new boss may let you work from anywhere: More companies see benefits of letting new hires work  from far away, even once COVID-19 fades

2 COVID Americas: One hopes for an extension of federal unemployment and stimulus. The other is saving and spending.

“I am aware of no other nutrient that causes such emotion,” said Dr. Daniel Monti, chair of Integrative Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia.

Consumers have shown that with their wallets, including some who mainline it into their veins or just load up on tablets. Vitamin C supplement sales soared to about $209 million during the first half of 2020, up 76% compared with the same period last year, according to Nielsen research.

In the federal case near Detroit, Dr. Charles Mok has been charged with health care fraud and is accused of using the pandemic as an opportunity to bill insurers, including Medicare, for high-dose vitamin C intravenous infusions that authorities say were “fraudulently represented as COVID-19 treatments and preventative measures.”

His case drew investigators from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the FBI, who wore protective gear during the raid in April to guard against exposure to COVID-19. Mok’s next court date is scheduled for September.

Since April, the Federal Trade Commission also has issued at least 37 warning letters to health clinics and wellness centers across the nation, accusing them of overhyping similar high-dose IV infusions of vitamin C. The FTC regulates against deceptive business practices and accused the clinics of unlawfully marketing such therapies to prevent or treat COVID-19, a disease without a proven cure or prevention.

Some claims were brazen. “Research shows that high dose Vitamin C is effective against COVID-19,” said the website of the LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine in St. Charles, Ill., according to the FTC’s warning in April. “GIVE US A CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR VITAMIN C IV AT 50% OFF!”

The FTC told the firm and others to cease such claims because they lacked sufficient scientific evidence.

The businesses since have taken down their COVID claims, but many generally still offer such IV treatments to boost immunity and overall health despite being considered dubious by many experts.

Such treatments often sell for about $200 and are generally considered safe for patients to receive under proper medical oversight. But there are risks. They’re not scientifically proven, meaning customers might be spending their money on a service that may or may not work.

Selling hope: Stem cell companies offer unproven medicine for COVID-19

Bye bye $600: Think that extra $600 in unemployment benefits will last until the end of July? Think again.

History of misunderstanding

So why all the fuss over a household vitamin that can be squeezed out of a grapefruit?

Because it’s a form of hope against the fear of the deadly coronavirus, medical experts say. And that hope has surged even though claims about its powers generally are unreliable, false or premature at best without more evidence from experimental clinical trials, according to experts in nutrition and medicine.

Vitamin C still has its champions. Take the case of movie and TV stuntman Greg Fitzpatrick, the longtime double of actor Ben Stiller. Fitzpatrick attributes his recovery from a prostate cancer diagnosis in 2016 to a change in diet and regular intake of high-dose vitamin C. He also continues to get 75 grams of IV therapy weekly because he said he believes it boosts his immune system and “keeps me healthy during COVID.”

“Can you prove it? I guess not,” Fitzpatrick told USA TODAY. He said he believes in it “wholeheartedly.”

Vitamin C “has not been studied with much rigor,” said Alexander Michels, research coordinator at the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, which studies the role of vitamins in human health. “The molecule – ascorbic acid – is not easy to work with and has properties that make it difficult to understand. Therefore, it has a long history of misunderstanding in the scientific community and medical practice.”

Clinical trials involving COVID-19 vitamin C treatments are pending and could take years before reaching conclusions. Monti’s team at Thomas Jefferson aims to see whether IV vitamin C can help prevent progression of the disease and avoid the need to put patients on a ventilator.

“If I ever had to be treated for COVID, I would definitely push to be put on my own trial to get IV vitamin C – not because there is current proof it would do anything but because I believe there is a plausible mechanism that it might,” Monti said.

Monti and other health care experts say most people generally get all the vitamin C they need by eating a good amount of fruits and vegetables, which helps boost their immune system and overall health.

But when the pandemic hit, people wanted to believe that consuming larger doses could defend the body against the novel coronavirus, echoing a similar theory that spread in the popular culture starting around 1970.

That’s when vitamin C evangelist Linus Pauling published his book “Vitamin C and the Common Cold,” which made the case that a bigger dose could build up a better defense, a notion now considered to be debatable at best and discredited at worst.

Fifty years later, the belief was again dispersed rapidly and globally.

Viral misinformation

In January, misinformation already was transmitting on social media before the pandemic shut down the U.S. economy.  In one example, a Facebook user advised people in the Philippines to “load up” on vitamin C to prevent COVID-19, among other advice. That post was shared at least 15,000 times but ultimately was flagged for false information.

By early March, 21% in the U.S. thought that taking vitamin C “probably” or “definitely” prevents infection and 26% were unsure, according to a national probability survey cited in a study of misinformation on the disease by the Harvard Kennedy School.

On Instagram, actress Marla Maples, the former wife of President Donald Trump, has been among those vouching for it.

“Now I’m getting a vitamin C drip (IV),” she said in a March 13 post that showed her getting an infusion. “I’ve done this off and on for a few years, but right now I feel like it’s really more important because of the spread of the coronavirus and flus and other viruses we may not even know of that are in our world. Do all you can to build your immune system right now. Take your liposomal vitamin C.  if you have the chance and can find someone that does vitamin C drips, I would look it up.”

Maples didn’t respond to a message seeking comment through her website.

By late March, the Australian government decided to make a public statement about an unspecified report that said intravenous high-dose vitamin C may be beneficial in the management of a COVID-19 infection.

“We have investigated this report and found there is no robust scientific evidence to support the usage of this vitamin in the management of COVID-19,” said Australia’s Therapeutic Goods Administration.

In the U.S., health-related businesses started trying to cash in with IV therapies, citing reports of positive results from China in the treatment of COVID-19. After the FTC cracked down on it, many cut the claims.

In the Detroit area case, Dr. Mok’s Allure Medical spa based in Shelby Township “submitted at least 98 claims to insurance companies, including Medicare, related to Vitamin-C infusion therapy services offered to patients as purported COVID-19 treatment and preventative care,” according to the federal criminal complaint against him. His attorney declined comment.

Such firms generally are for-profit and are not taking part in experimental clinical trials seeking to establish scientific evidence on vitamin C.

In those clinical trials, intravenous vitamin C has shown promise in treatments for sepsis and some tumor types, Monti said.

By contrast, many wellness centers and naturopathic firms still offer unproven intravenous vitamin C therapies, saying they boost immunity and health with antioxidants.

“Higher blood levels of vitamin C can be achieved with IV infusion than with oral intake, and that would be the argument for IV administration: a rapid spike in blood levels that exert some acute anti-microbial effect,” said Dr. David Katz, a preventative medicine specialist and founding director of Yale University’s Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center. “I am aware of no actual evidence of benefit, so this is hope and wishful thinking on the part of the recipient, and opportunism and exploitation on the part of the provider.”

Only one injection product cleared

The manner in which these injectable vitamin C products are sold and distributed also is murky under the law.

Only one vitamin C injection product has been approved for use in the U.S. by the Food and Drug Administration, which regulates drug safety and effectiveness. That product is Ascor by McGuff Pharmaceuticals and is approved only for the short-term treatment of scurvy, a disease caused by vitamin C deficiency.

Yet the wellness firms that sell IV therapies are not treating scurvy and don’t necessarily require a prescription, depending on the dosage. Several said they obtain the vitamin C from compounding pharmacies, which don’t appear to be selling Ascor and might get the vitamin C from elsewhere, sometimes derived from corn.

Last October, the FDA even took the step of issuing a warning that said, “All other ascorbic acid injection products are unapproved new drugs that should not be distributed in interstate commerce without a new drug application approved by FDA.”

So then how are these other vitamin C injection products compliant with the law?

“This is a very complicated question and has been at the heart of various changes and the evolution of compounding pharmacy laws and regulations for many years,” said Nicholas Hoang of McGuff Pharmaceuticals, the maker of Ascor.

The FDA didn’t answer a request for clarity. Pharmacies that were identified as providing these products to wellness firms didn’t immediately return messages, nor did naturopathic doctors with expertise in IV therapies.

Compounding pharmacies do have some legal leeway when tailoring drugs for individuals, as do doctors who can make approved drugs available for off-label uses. But how the vitamin C IV business jibes with the FDA isn’t clear, nor is much of the science surrounding vitamin C for consumers. In general, Monti said, vitamin C has provoked strong claims from famous scientists for decades, as well as strong counter-arguments from others.

“If (consumers) take it and see a positive effect, who can really discount their experience?” Michels of the Pauling Institute said in an e-mail. “On the other hand, the science is lagging far, far behind. Consumers, doctors, and scientists alike often think they know everything there is to know about vitamin C, but most of them have an incomplete picture. Even those who have dedicated their lives to studying this vitamin admit that they know very little.”

Follow reporter Brent Schrotenboer @Schrotenboer. E-mail: bschrotenb@usatoday.com

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Vitamin C by IV and an FBI raid. How hope, rather than proof, sent the antioxidant’s sales soaring during COVID-19.

Studies say vitamin D helps immune system fight COVID-19 - The Tribune

Studies: vitamin D helps immune system fight COVID-19 – The Tribune

  • July 15, 2020

Jim Walker
jim.walker@irontontribune.com

Could vitamin D be the kryptonite to the coronavirus and the bullpen relief to keep sports playing?
There are many medical personnel who note that proper levels of vitamin D bolster the immune system and that may be the key to battling the coronavirus.
Vitamin D actually converts to a hormone once it is in the body and boosts the immune system. Vitamin D can be found in such foods as oily fish, egg yolks and whole milk, but the best way to ensure the proper amount is with a supplement vitamin.
Another good way to get the necessary amount of vitamin D is simply to spend 15 to 20 minutes a day in sunlight, something that is often seen with patients in rest homes on a daily basis. This manner is the most natural and desirable way to get the needed level.
Vitamin D not only helps with the cornonavirus but with colds and flu which are also a virus. According to medical personnel, the body can have as many as 12 viruses in its system at one time.
Several research groups have found a correlation between people with higher and lower levels of vitamin D.
Researchers have studied other countries and found that the sickest patients often have the lowest levels of vitamin D and that countries with high death rates had larger numbers of people with vitamin D deficiency than countries with lower death rates.
Experts say healthy blood levels of vitamin D may give people with COVID-19 a survival advantage by helping them avoid cytokine storm which is when the immune system overreacts and attacks the body’s own cells and tissues instead of fighting an infection.
The early research has not been peer-reviewed as of yet and other experts say scientific proof is lacking that vitamin D could prevent COVID-19 or make the infection milder.
However, researchers in the United Kingdom evaluated the average vitamin D levels and the number of COVID-19 cases as well as the death rates across 20 European countries.
They found that countries with low average of vitamin D blood levels in the population had higher numbers of COVID-19 cases and deaths according to study leader Petre Cristian Ilie, MD, PhD, who is the research and innovation director at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Foundation Trust in King’s Lynn, U.K.
And, Irish researchers analyzed European population studies and vitamin D levels and found that countries with high rates of vitamin D deficiency also had high death rates from COVID-19. Those researchers asked the government to raise the vitamin D recommendations.
One study said that there is an “indisputable relation between vitamin D and the immune system.”
Professor Philip Calder from the University of Southhampton in England added that vitamin C, zinc and DHA omega-3 also help fight viral infections.
The role of vitamin D in the immune system has been recognized for about 35 years. However, it was only in recent years that the implications of vitamin D deficiency on the immune system have become clearer.
People can store up vitamin D in their body for approximately two months. But once the sunny summer days give way to colder days of winter, supplement vitamins are the best route since foods do not produce enough vitamin D alone.
Anyone above the age of four should have 10 micrograms (400 IU) daily, especially from October to March. People at higher risk such as those with little or no exposure to the sun and people with darker skin are advised to take a supplement year-round.
The Department of Health recommends a daily limit of 100 micrograms or 4000 IU.

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